What is it? CXL

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The latest set has just been posted:
http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com /
Rob
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799 tool for shoemakers? 802 adjustable wrench for screws that are difficult to reach?
greetings from germany Chris
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803. a stock knife or block knife for rough shaping wood for traditional woodworking.The hook goes under a staple nailed into the end of a section of log set on end. Page 207 in Eric Sloane's Sketches of America Past. Karl
R.H. wrote:

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According to the seller these are not block knives, but were created to be used on a particular plant.
Rob
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Was it a cane knife for sugar cane. I live in Hawaii and the only ones I've seen look like this. http://www.orchardsedge.com/order1.jsp?code=MA-61040&referer=%2Ftools.jsp%3Ftype%3Dchoppingtools Karl
R.H. wrote:

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They aren't for sugar cane, but what I should have said was that they're for a particular type of plant, not a "particular plant" since the tool is used on different plants that have similar qualities.
Rob
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type%3Dchoppingtools
It wouldn't be a turnip knife by any chance? Used for various root vegetables the hook pulls the vegetable out of the ground and the root and foliage is topped and tailed with the blade. -- Dave Baker Puma Race Engines www.pumaracing.co.uk Camp American engineer minces about for high performance specialist (4,4,7)
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Nope, it isn't a turnip knife.
Rob
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How about a date knife. Used in palm tree's for dates and other palm fruits. Puff

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wrote:

Gerry @ RCM Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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Yep, I think so; but I'm sure this one is a grafting froe, there's one that looks just like it in the Dictionary of American Hand Tools. I think the hook is for hanging it on your belt or on a tree limb.
Rob
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http://www.orchardsedge.com/order1.jsp?code=MA-61040&referer=%2Ftools.jsp%3Ftype%3Dchoppingtools
    Tobacco?
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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801 looks exactly like a brass version of a car mechanic's ball-joint splitter. It's designed for pressing something out of something else or into something else anyway. You wouldn't get much force on that handle though so it isn't for anything heavy duty.
802. The right hand end is clearly the jaw of a spanner so I guess it's designed for getting at hard to reach nuts.
804. The teeth have the form of saw teeth. Gripping teeth would normally be symmetrical. Looks like you clamp it to something moving and then it saws through something else. -- Dave Baker Puma Race Engines www.pumaracing.co.uk Camp American engineer minces about for high performance specialist (4,4,7)
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There are no correct guesses yet for 801, according to the patent they were invented to be used by a woodworker.
Rob
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opined:

I don't think the toothed section is a saw blade. I think it's a ratchet of some sort, like you might see on an extending ladder. I think it's intended to be clamped to a wooden workpiece, then hooked onto something else.
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799. An abused circle cuter or groover, maybe specialized? 804. A boot scraper designed to clamp on the edge of a step.
R.H. wrote:

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"It doesn't really take all kinds; there just *are* all kinds".
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"R.H." wrote:

799: COACHMAKER'S PLOW PLANE http://www.mjdtools.com/auction/graphics/a197967.htm
Wolfgang
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800 is a candle holder used in mining. It can be stabbed into a wooden beam or hung on one. 802 is a wrench which you can roll up for compactness. I am sure the cotter pins holding the ends on are not original.
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Leo Lichtman wrote:

I think it's actually sort of a flexible crow's-foot wrench, to reach difficult-to-reach bolts. Note the square on the end, where a handle could be attached.
Also, though I agree the cotter pin is not original, I wouldn't be surprised if it had interchangeable heads, for different size bolts.
Actually, I want one. I can think of a couple of locations on my truck where that would be useful.
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R.H. wrote:

I know! They are torture instruments used by the Spanish Inquisition.
Bob Kolker
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