What is it? CLXXV

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Set 175 has just been posted:
http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com /
Rob
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Not sure what your 1015 has been used for, possibly had a small rope running through it. Tent line tensioning perhaps?
We use something almost identical at my work for an entirely different purpose. Would you like me to send you a picture and description?
--
William

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wrote:

I'd be interested to see your work tool, please send the photo to my gmail account, it can be found by clicking on my profile on the upper right of my site.
Thanks, Rob
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Will try to get a few photos sent this weekend.
Consensuses is that this tool was originally intended for wood. Still curious what use (or abuse) the one pictured this week has seen. Don't see how it could ever get that *dull* being used as a corner rounder. I know wood can be abrasive, but I would have thrown it away long before it got that bad. Assuming re-sharpening was not possible, which it is. And quite simple too.
BTW one of the comments on your blog gave the exact same use I was thinking - plastics. And I can attest to there effectiveness.
--
William

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On Fri, 22 Jun 2007 23:50:56 GMT, Me, myself and I > wrote:

Just did a Google image search for "cornering tool" and the Veritas, Lee Valley, and an antique Stanley I found on the first few pages are all ground a bit differently than the ones I have used. Would also make them slightly harder to re-sharpen. And may explain some, but not all, of what looks like extreme wear in your photo.
--
William

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It got that dull by some yahoo using a drill-mounted wire wheel to strip rust from it. Note the pitting.
I think this predates any Lee Valley offering by some time.
scott
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1015. Is for rounding over the edge off of a wooden board. I tried looking it up but don't remember the name. Karl

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and again my silly guesses...
1013 electronic key 1014 scraper for cleaning surfaces, e.g. after removing glued rug (geklebten teppich) 1015 maybee used for mounting bicycle tires 1016 hmmm, for closing, hmmm, tin cans? 1017 my first thought was ... astrolabe ... but this looks different ... yep, must be a armillary sphere 1018 the pliers at the end can be adjusted, hmmm, itchy and scratchy stuff? (no idea)
greetings from germany chris
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The 2 legs are different lengths. It looks like an oversized valve spring compressor.

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hi mike,
wrote in message

hmmm, is there anybody who said that the tin can must be symmetrically formed? definitely nobody!
;-) yep, youre right, 1016 doesnt look symmetrically formed
greetings from germany chris
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that it is too close to call. You might call it, not sure if I'd hang my hat on it, though.
R
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wrote in message

that it is too close to call. You might call it, not sure if I'd hang my hat on it, though.
R
Yes, the two parts are supposed to be the same length, but don't look like it because the one is raised a little and the camera was not directly over the center of the tool.
Rob
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R.H. wrote:

1013 "Dallas Key" used to log in automatically - I use these with retraunt POS systems every day.
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1014. Stair Saw or Stairbuilder's Saw - For cutting slots in stringers --- It's adjustable for depth of cut.
1015. Don't know the name, but I have one. -- used for rounding over the edges of a board.
1017. Spherical Astrolabe or Armilary Sphere ("armilary" from the Latin "armilla", bracelet)
Joel
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1013 Dallas iButton, electronic dongle or "key"
1014 Blind saw, used for all sorts of groove-cutting or even veneering purposes in confined spaces. Exactly who used it would depend on how big it is and how the teeth are sharpened (rip or knife)
1015 That rare beast, a bad tool from Veritas. Supposedly for rounding the edges of woodwork, but it's a poor way to do it.
1016 Obviously a press, and a pretty big one at that. I'd guess it's for packing some sort of bale or container, squeezing more packages into the top of it.
1017 Armillary sphere. It's a globe of the Earth, mounted in a representation of the heavens. Don't recognise what's special about the earlier one - Ptolemaic ?
1018 Adjustable C spanner, probably for big pipe fittings.
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1013. Electronic key. Based on that gray background piece, I'm guessing it's for some electronic sports/exercise equipment. 1014. Stairbuilder's saw 1015. That's a Stanley 29 cornering tool in the picture. Contrary to Andy's view, I like my Veritas set. If it's kept sharp it works fine. It won't replace a router, but I use it in all sorts of situations. It takes a bit of practice to learn how to run the tool and reverse the direction according to the grain, but it's fast and fits in an apron. I certainly like it better than that radi-plane thing! If you ever do outdoor projects with Azek or similar expanded PVC wood substitute, try the cornering tool. On that stuff - with no grain - it works great. Particularly useful for creating uniform lamb's tongues. 1016. Pretty sure that's what my Mom used to get Brussel sprouts into me. ;) 1017. Armillary sphere. Wouldn't have known that if not for last week's celestial apparati. 1018. {Deductive powers engaged} Similar to a peavey, but too short, ratcheting mechanism to preserve levering gains, turn of the 20th century casting, rounded jaws...I'm guessing a tool to install hard rubber tires on wagons or early cars with wooden wheels.
R
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This guess is not correct but it's in the right ballpark. It will be at least a few more hours until I have time to post the answers.
Rob
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"R.H." wrote:

#1013 is a Dallas Semiconductor "I Button"
#1015 is some hind of edge rounding or deburring tool
#1016 is clearly a press of some sort. looks like it's intended to press something in a barrel.
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#1013 is a segway key (black is slowest speed, IIRC). #1014 is a veneer saw #1015 is a cornering tool #1016 for sealing jars?
scott
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1014: Dado saw 1015: Paint can opener 1017: Mechanical star map (the real name escapes me...)
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