What is it? CLIII

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On 19 Jan 2007 05:32:53 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com (DoN. Nichols) wrote:

substitute 'plane table' for table and you may have it.
plane tabling dates from before the 1950's. the mapping surveyor went to a spot and put up his plane table and levelled it. then put the piece of paper on it positioned so that the point on the emerging drawing was plumbed over the spot on the ground. the sheet was oriented precisely to the detail and radial lines drawn to prominent objects. by moving around to other points and plotting to prominent objects the entire detail could be developed on the map. you would only need a needle with a small movement to aid in orientation of the map.
I've never actually seen one so I'm guessing and the technique predates my surveying time.
a land surveyor's plain tabling compass is my guess.
Stealth Pilot australia
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On Fri, 19 Jan 2007 18:40:32 +0900, Stealth Pilot

I think this is right. It is called a "Trough Compass" and is indeed used with a Plane Table. See the following links for some examples:
http://www.gmat.unsw.edu.au/currentstudents/ug/projects/f_pall/html/s1.html
http://www.gemmary.com/rcb/instcat/06/06-003.html
http://www.orbitals.com/pic/survey/index.html
http://www.google.com/patents?vid=USPAT2696054
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Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
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Thanks, seems to me that this is probably the correct answer.
Rob
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I'm going with the dental press answer for now since there were similar devices on the link, but I'm open to the idea of an ointment press if anyone can provide a link to a similar one.

According to the "Dictionary of American Hand Tools":
"The cork cutter was used in drug stores and similar establishments to make small corks."
I'm sure they could also have been used to make holes in corks for tubing, though he doesn't mention that in the book.
Rob
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R.H. wrote:

I have no idea what an 'ointment press' is. I figured ointment (such as lip balms, etc) were poured into their containers as liquids and allowed to cool, not compressed into them.
Knowing that Stellon was a dental equipment factory, I think the crucible-type thing on EBay was the container where you mixed up the acrylic before you poured it into the mold. I have no basis for this (yet, but I'm looking), but I suppose that the central metal cylinder in the press could have served two purposes: first it was stored in the press as a 'spacer' to hold the whole thing tightly together between uses. Then, the dentist or technician would place the cylinder beside the press, place the cruciable on the cylinder (maybe over a burner?) while they mixed the acrylic, and then pour it in the mold which was placed in the press until it cured.
Like I said, this is just supposition. Any dentists here, or dental technicians?
--riverman
--riverman
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humunculus wrote:

Here's a nice Flikr slide slow showing how this press was used.
http://tinyurl.com/32yktp
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Thanks, looks like you nailed this one.
Rob
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    Nope! Go ahead.

    Then the Dictionary is *wrong*.

    Corks to fit in a bottle have a taper (except for wine corks, which are compressed through a necking device for the purpose of obtaining a snug fit). Anything produced by these would be straight sided.
Check out:
<https://www1.fishersci.com/Coupon ;jsessionid=Fy3DSg75U6Qkl28D3WRuyxeMNym7rnpPuaSgND6pCYv1Ed1QfJYf!-1384766102?cid41&gid#75539>
(or of that fails due to wrapping, connect to:
    <http://www.fishersci.com/
and use the search entry to look for "cork borer"
In particular, the description for one of those offered reads:
=====================================================================Cork Borers; Will bore holes in corks and rubber stoppers; Plated tubing; Smooth plastic handles; Handles stamped with number designation; Set of 3 ranging 4.8 to 7.8mm ===================================================================== And there are other sets going up to "Set of 15", all of whose descriptions are identical other than that.
    Aside from the vendor being more likely to know the use than a dictionary writer, consider the term "borer", which is an object to make a hole in something -- not to make what came out of the hole.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
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DoN. Nichols wrote:

Wikipedia has a pretty definitive answer (as definitive as any resource that is not academic peer reviewed).
--riverman
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R.H. wrote:

879- Disk from a tesla turbine?
Dave
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Another photo for this week, on the link below is a picture of a hook that someone sent to me, it's 7-1/2" long:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album%205/hook.jpg
Anyone know what it would have been used for?
Rob
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R.H. wrote:

It looks like a chain hook. Not uncommon, except for the flattened part at the top. It seems like it 'buttonholed' into a link on the chain, rather than the more common method of using a U-bolt to attach it.
--riverman
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We have one on our boom truck at the end of the steel wire rope crane. It is held by a simple, single loop in the wire rope held by 3 wire rope connectors. The boom is rated for 5,000 #.
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DanG
A live Singing Valentine quartet,
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The owner of it was mostly wondering how it was attached to a chain or wire since it didn't have an eye like other hooks, thanks for answering this one.
Rob
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881 (or is it 882?) Is a set of rubber or cork stopper hole "punches". Found in most college chemistry labs. You twist them into the rubber stopper - the sharp ends do the cutting.
charlie b
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