What is it? CCVI

Set number 206 has just been posted:
http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com /
Rob
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1147 Pump (as any fool can plainly see), air pump, probably for automobile tires, from the good old days when the gas pumps in gas stations were also manually operated.

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1142: Friction clutch
1145: Fire starter: soak the ceramic material with alcohol and light
1147: I see the word "Altitude" on the gauge: vacuum pump (for testing altimeters?) (for testing vacuum-operated turn/bank indicators?) for aircraft.
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1142: A pulley with a brake. Perhaps for a stage, for lowering scenery or your literal deus ex machina.
1143: There is or was a Buckeye tobacco company; perhaps a cigar display box?
1144: Looks like part of a lamp
1145: Bullet molds
1146: Perhaps a thickness gauge (for measuring the OD of something), but seems a bit elaborate for that.
1147: It's a pump, but the "altitude" marking gauge is interesting. Perhaps it is intended as part of some equipment for simulating lower pressures up to 70,000 feet.
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Matthew T. Russotto wrote:

read water pressure in feet. You would remove the glass and set the red hand to normal pressure.
I think the Cleveland Faucet Company sold this pump for plumbers to find seepage with air pressure. The gage would tell if he was losing air, and soapy water could show where it was escaping.
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On Thu, 15 Nov 2007 09:53:53 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@grace.speakeasy.net (Matthew T. Russotto) wrote:

It's a "shallow water dive pump" for pumping air to an old-style hard-helmet diver.
<http://www.nauticalantiquesandgifts.com/catalog/item/2573712/3413297.htm The one on the linked webpage is also made by The Cleveland Faucet Co.
This one shows the hose fitting that the pressure gauge is attached to: <http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item '0140588705>
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Barbara Bailey wrote:

The diameter of each cylinder looks like 2.5" and the height 3". The whole inside wouldn't be available for air, so a stroke would be less than 15 cubic inches. A cycle of the lever would be less than 30 cubic inches.
At 68 feet, a helmeted diver would require a pump to suck in 4.5 cubic feet of air per minute. That would be more than 259 cycles of the pump lever per minute.
I should stay away from math. It gets me all mixed up!
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wrote:

I think you're seriously underestimating the size of the cylinders. They're much closer to twice as tall as they are in diameter than they are to the same height as diameter.
If you look at the two links, the first one says that the base is 5" wide, and it looks like the cylinder is about 3" of that. The one to the eBay sale gives a total height of the mechanism of 14", and the cylinders appear to be between 5" and 6" in height -- they're slightly less than half the overall height. That changes the volume to somewhere much closer to 30 to 35 cubic inches for each cylinder, and 70 or more for both. As it's a walking-beam mechanism, the airflow is continuous.
Also, "shallow water diving" is 15 meters or less; so 50 feet or less (2.5 atmospheres rather than 4;) that would require 900 cu. inches of air or around 12 strokes a minute.
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Barbara Bailey wrote:

I was looking at RH's pictures. With an overall height of 43", I calculated the diameter of the gage at 5.5". I used that to calculate the size of the cylinders.

would be 3 atmospheres. http://www.divingheritage.com/leverpumps.htm This page recommends 1.5 cubic feet per minute for each atmosphere.
At 2.5 atmospheres that would be 4320 cubic inches, approximately 5 times your calculation. If the diver could tolerate more CO2 or he exhaled toward the vent, perhaps his requirement would be much lower than I read.
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wrote:

But is his 43" to the top of the lever as it stands at an angle, or if it were exactly upright? The Columbus Faucet #20 pump listed for sale is 49" tall at full upright.

The gauge was supplied by another company. (The speedometer on my car goes to 100, but the car doesn't.) So the fact that the gauge goes to 70 doesn't mean that anyone expected the pump to do so.

OK, I bobbled the math there. But even taking that into account, that's 60 strokes a minute, not 200+

OK, I was using different base numbers. This page <http://www.mtsu.edu/~psyskip/physics.htm , in the bottom section: Howlong will my air last? was using a base number of 1 cu.ft/minute on the surface and included this statement: "By the way most new divers do breathe about 1 cubic feet per minute."
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Barbara Bailey wrote:

I assumed RH measured 43" as it stands. With the lever vertical, it would be about 47".
It's easy to see the stroke. It's the exposed piston rod with the lever tipped the other way.
I've remeasured RH's. It looks a bore of 2.8" and a stroke of 3" for 36 cubic inches per cycle.
The one on Ebay appears to have a bore of 3" and a stroke of 3.5" for 50 cubic inches per cycle.
The Model 20 appears to have a bore of 3" and a stroke of 4" for 56 cubic inches per cycle.

When I expand the image so the device is 14.5 cm tall, the cylinders are 4.7 cm tall and the visible piston rod, which is the stroke, is 3.5 cm. That would mean 3.5".

OK, 2.5 atmospheres is fine with me. That would be about 50 feet on the gage, as you say.

I calculate the capacity of the largest pump to be 56 cubic inches per cycle, which isn't much less than your estimate. I don't see why you say a diver would need only 900 cubic inches per minute at 2.5 atmospheres. Isn't 2.5 cubic feet 4320 cubic inches?
For the three pumps, I calculate 120 86 77 cycles per minute. The first one, 120, would be 4 strokes (2 each way) per second. How long could anyone keep that up? (Not having tried, I don't know.)

diver exhales into his air supply. If he uses as little air as the scuba diver, the air he inhales may have as much CO2 as the air the scuba diver exhales.
Perhaps in the days of hand pumps, helmeted divers got less than 1.5 cubic feet per atmosphere per minute and tolerated breathing air that was relatively high in CO2. Also, RH's pump may have been for the shallowest diving.
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wrote:

Ah, and the other source of the confusion appears. Your original statement was that the *cylinder* looked like it was about 3" in height. You knew that you were referring to the stroke length -- I thought you were talking about the height of the cylinder itself.

The pump itself without the lever? or the whole thing -- base to top of handle?

That was the math bobble. I mis-converted average lung capacity in mL into cu.in./minute, without accounting for breaths/minute.

No clue here either, beyond a statement on on of those webpages mentioned above, that the pump crew for one hard-helmet shallow diver could be as many as 8 men.

Well, when he gives us the answer, and tells which number he photoshopped off the yoke, I bet one of the dive pages that we were both looking at will be able to provide the specs for a Cleveland Faucet #Whatever dual cylinder air pump. <g>
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I wish I could tell you more about the pump, the only thing that I photoshopped was the auction tag, so I don't have any further info on this device. If I find out any more about it I'll let everyone know.
Rob
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Barbara Bailey wrote:

Originally, I was talking about RH's cylinders, excluding the top and bottom caps. After I looked at yours it dawned on me that I could measure the piston rods.

It's the one from Ebay (thanks for the link). It has no handle and says 14.5". It would be more accurate to expand it to fill my screen but more foolproof to lat a cm = an inch.

I can see why. The estimates I calculated were for 1 cubic foot a minute. For the 1.5 that's recommended these days, the pumps would have been worked 50% faster.
No wonder they went to two-man pumps. Maybe I can analyze one. Two men using four arms on two levers could apply more force. If the bore were 40% bigger and the stroke twice as long, they could go 75% slower.

The gage on RH's pump was made for the expansion tank in a heating system. The red hand was set for normal conditions. On a diver's pump I think it was a depth redline. That would mean the safe limit was 15 feet (for the diver's head).
Suppose a man could pump 60 cycles (120 strokes) a minute. If the pump put its whole displacement into the supply line, that would be 1.25 cubic feet per minute at the surface and 0.87 cubic feet entering the helmet 15 feet down. That's 58% of what's recommended.
I think it's feasible. The problem is not lacking oxygen but reacting to CO2. In grade school I'd be so cold at night that I'd sleep curled up with the sheet and blankets over my head. The elevated CO2 didn't bother me because I was used to it.
To supply a diver with 0.87 cubic feet a minute with 120 strokes a minute, the Ebay pump would have been good for a helmet 35 feet down. The Cleveland pump you found would have been good to 42 feet. It would depend on the diver's tolerance for CO2, his muscle mass, his exertion, and perhaps the design of his helmet.
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As a mildly interesting kinematic comment: The horizontal distance from the pivots at the top of the piston rods to the center pivot varies (as the cosine of the handle angle). To make the mechanism work, the cylinders have to be pivoted about a horizontal axis at their bottoms. Hence the flexible tube connecting them.
wrote:

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1142. Variable diameter pulley. Moving the handle to the right moves the left half sheave closer to the right one and increases the effective diameter of the pulley. It's used to vary the speed of belt driven equipment. Art

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Okey-dokey...guesses this time.
1142 -- I suspect this to be a speed governor, apparently working by varying the effective diameter of a pulley for a belt or otherwise varying some friction connection. Another possibility is an automatic stopping device for a machine (movie projector?) when something (movie film?) breaks or runs out, but I'm going with the governor.
1143 -- Is this a through-the-door mailbox of some sort? Failing that, it must be a 9" buckeye box.
1144 -- Frame for holding candles for dipping?
1145 -- Holder for goods for a street or stadium vendor--possibly for lollypops or (from the eagle motif) sparklers or other pyrotechnics. Why else would you have slightly diagonal handles?
1146 -- Adjustable air inlet for something--possibly a door closer? Pure guesswork here, even more than the other guesses.
1147 -- Test fixture for altimeters, in its natural (?) habitat among a large collection of assorted scales, woodworking hand tools, and sundry other old items.
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1142 looks like a commercial fishing Gurdy.
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