What is it? CCIII

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Just posted set number 203:
http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com /
Rob
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1122. A surveyor's tape measure.
1123. I'll guess the case for a theodolite or other surveying equipment.
1124 A burner of some sort. Looks a bit like a weed whacker.
1128. This is a hygrometer kit for accurately measuring the specific gravity of fluids. Common in the brewing industry as well as many others. The thermometer on the sample container allows the user to correct for the temperature of the fluid being measured.
--
Dave Baker - Puma Race Engines



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or even a hydrometer kit :)
--
Dave Baker - Puma Race Engines



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1124. Gasoline powered soldering iron. Karl

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R.H. wrote:

1126 Watchman's Key box.
These little boxes held a coded key which a night watchman would access while making his rounds and "punch in" to a paper tape he carried around with him in a special device. It was a way of establishing/proving that he had actually made his rounds (and not just slept his shift away).
Rich
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1123- contains an antenna?
1124- gasoline or kero fired soldering iron
1125- spoon for handling/dispensing reactive compounds while doing 'chemistry-type-stuff'
1128- for measuring the specific gravity of, well, specifically what? Maple syrup?, no, that wouldn't need different bobbers...
Dave
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Map case?

Agree -- something of the sort.

Close, at any rate. I imagine it's for measuring drugs, from back in the old days when nearly every prescription was compounded on the spot by a pharmacist.

Measuring the alcohol content of various liquids would be my guess, hence the need for different floats. Beer is typically around 6% alcohol, wine about 12%, port about 18%. Liquor is highly variable, usually between 30% and 80%. A single hydrometer could be used for both beer and wine, but probably not for port; one that works for port might not for brandy; and one that works for brandy might not for moonshine.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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1127: This is a military demolition charge computing tape, made by Justice Roe and Sons. You use the correct scale to measure the thickness of the type of fortification you wish to breach, and the scale reads in pounds of tnt needed. It also gives factors depending on the placement of the charge, i.e., centered on the wall, at the base, etc.
These tapes are quite hard to find, and in fact, were classified military items only available to the proper personnel. I spoke to J Roe in the late 1980's when I found one, and they explained that they had been only been declassified after the Vietnam conflict.
I am descended from the Roe family (my great-great grandfather was a Roe), their factory was on Roe Blvd in Patchogue, Long Island. They have been absorbed by the Stanley Group.
--
Dennis


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Oops, that should be the Cooper Group, Stanley's competitor. They also own Lufkin, Crescent, Weller, and many other tool companies
--
Dennis


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Thanks for the info on the tape, I don't own it but took the photos at an auction and was wondering if it was legal for them to sell it.
Rob
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1122 Surveyor's measuring tape. Probably one "chain" in length, the steel tape designs replaced chains as they were easier to handle (not because they wore out less, even on a chain that's negligible). it'll be calibrated somewhere with correction factors for temperature.
1123 carrying case for something, probably the tripod for surveying gear. "AAI" is the American Alpine Institute (a climbing organisation) so it was probably used to support a theodolite when measuring the heights of peaks.
1124 Soldering iron. Looks like it's petrol-fired rather than paraffin, as I can't see a pre-heat cup.
1125 Marrow spoon for hungry chemists. I imagine it was made as a lab spatula for something noxious that would react with the more common nickel spatulas. However chemists are getting hungry these days and they'll eat anything (and with anything).
1126 Covered wall-mounted box, but not sealed or locked in any way. Holy Water was usually open topped, so I'm guessing this was for dry powder like chalk, where people (competitors?) needed to coat their hands frequently for a better grip.
1127 Engineer's tape measure, from the days when "engineering" meant military engineering or sapping and was all about digging or demolishing things. It measures the thickness of various materials and is calibrated in charge weights to put a hole through them.
I've only ever seen old ones before on cloth tapes. This looks modern? So I'll guess Vietnam era.
1128 Hydrometer. High accuracy one, as it uses a constant diameter flask to minimise surface tension variation and is also calibrated for temperature change. So I'd guess it's related to government taxation on alcohol.
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These were used from post WW II through Vietnam.
--
Dennis


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Interesting set this week.
1128. The labels on the various tubes seem to have the image of presidents on them? Washingtons looks like the same image as the older dollar. As far as I can determine, Hayes was never on any denomination of currency. Is it common for presidential images to be used on tax stamps of some sort? Googling isn't doing much for me. Just curious.
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BillM wrote:

The glass tubes most likely held cigars. The bands that were on the cigars are still in the tubes.
John
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????? When I look at item 1128, it appears to be a hydrometer set of some type, and the glass tubes that contain the presidential images are the bulb of the hydrometer.
You see cigar tubes? Really? wow.
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1122: Surveyor's tape
1124: Soldering iron. Liquid fuel... Naptha? Kerosene?
1128: For measuring the specific gravity of a variety of liquids?
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On Thu, 25 Oct 2007 10:39:25 -0600, Dave Balderstone

1122: Tank gaging tape
--
Ned Simmons

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1122: Definitely an engineer's tape 1123: Looks like my plastic drawing (blueprint) holder, but I think it may be more for core samples. 1124: Looks like this one has already been answered 1125: Coke spoon for the large nostriled user, holds 1 gram. 1126: Even with my glasses on I cannot read the text on the lid.
Dave FL
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Nah, tank gaging tape - see 515E... http://catalog.starrett.com/catalog/catalog/groupf.asp?GroupIDR7
Though 1122 appears to be a Lufkin rather than a Starrett tape.
--
Ned Simmons

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On Thu, 25 Oct 2007 04:26:48 -0400, R.H. wrote:

Actually, I'm wearing the badge of the Grammar Police here. In the blurb for #1128, "is comprised of" doesn't mean anything.
To comprise is to contain, to be composed of: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q fine%3Acomprise So, to say, "is comprised of" is functionally equivalent to saying, "is was composed of of".
Ergo, you'd either say, "is composed of" or "comprises".
And, it's a double-whammy, because usually the people who say that think it makes them look sophisticated. ;-)
Cheers!
--
Rich Grise, Self-Appointed Chief,
Apostrophe/Grammar Police
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