what grits to sue when re-sharpening.

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On Mon, 8 Sep 2008 13:40:25 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote:

Here's a couple more ways to determine if you have a sharp edge:
1) you should be able to cleanly pare away end grain on softwood.
2) a sharp edge will not reflect light; if you can see tiny reflecting points of light, it is time to touch up the edge.
Also, back of the chisel (some call it the "face") is actually more important than the bevel. It should be dead flat and polished with the same or higher grit than your bevel.
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wrote:

so far, so good... with the chisel that came out the best, I can even do that to oak

only went to 800. time again to experiment
thx shelly
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[...snip...]
Actually, the softwood is a better test than a hardwood like oak; if your edge isn't sharp, softwood will just kind of crumble away. The hardwood will stand up better to the not so sharp edge and you can get some kind of shaving.

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wrote:

tried both, worked both times!
shelly
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