What do YOU use kerosene for?

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wrote:

kerosene, jet fuel and diesel fuel are *more or less* the same thing. reasonal substitutes for shop tasks like degreasing parts are paint thinner and turpentine. and WD40. the same stuffs are sold as lamp oil, parts degreaser and prolly under a bunch of other labels.
all of the above are fairly oily solvents and can be loosely interchanged. I wouldn't put turpentine in my jet engine or thin paint with WD40, but they will all work fine for unsticking rusty bolts.
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wrote:

Lamps, as you suggest, and for heat: A portable kerosene stove stopped us from freezing during one viscious winter storm. I also happen to have an old Coleman lantern that will work of either white gas or kerosene.
Reason? Cost = Cheap.
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wrote:

Kerosene has so many "uses" because folks used to have it around. It is very similar to mineral spirrits (paint thinner) and can be used in a similar manner. Since mineral spirits is usually cheaper if you don't have a place that sells it in bulk I use that. One not mentioned is mixing it with straight 30w oil as a cleaner preservative for metal. It works better than either one alone.
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I use in on my sharpening stones. For me, it works better than traditional cutting oil or 10 W 30.
wrote:

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Al Palmer wrote:

My woodcarving instructor used half kerosene and half motor oil on his stones.
--
Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA
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I too use kerosene for removing light rust. With a rag lightly dampened with kerosene you can wipe all your tools to keep them from rusting. Kerosene has many uses. It is effective in removing tar from vehicle finishes, without harming the paint. I've used it to remove paint/finish from my hands. Best of all, kerosene is has very low toxicity.
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Yes.

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Technically, kerosene is a "light petroleum distillate".
As such, it will: (1) function as a solvent for most hydro-carbon-based "goop" -- be it tree-sap, coal-tar, Vasoline, asphalt, or whatever. (2) combust readily -- much less volatile than 'gasoline', so you don't have (at least not to anywhere nearly the same degree) evaporation problem from unsealed containers. Well suited for lamps, etc. with at least 'semi-open' fuel reservoir. Also for 'smudge pots', used in fruit orchards, etc. to prevent frost damage. (3) function as a lubricant. It _is_ an oil -- it *does* have lubricating properties.
In *small* quantities, it is also used as a substitute for "medicinal" castor oil,
It is a "volatile" hydro-carbon. Given time, it _does_ 'evaporate', except for any impurities that may have been in it. This makes it useful for various kinds of 'cleaning' functions.
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On Wed, 09 Mar 2005 21:03:08 -0000, snipped-for-privacy@host122.r-bonomi.com (Robert Bonomi) wrote:

Hydrocarbon products are poisonous and carcinogenic. If you make a statement like that, you need to supply the source. Otherwise it's unconscionable, and please define "small dose" in the event that anyone who takes you at your word decides to give it a try on their mother in law or little brother.
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That's quite an overgeneralization. Vegetable oil is, after all, _a_ hydrocarbon.

Ironic to see that posted by someone calling themselves "guess who".
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No it's not. It's a carbohydrate. That indicates further that you don't know what you're talking about, and that people should be cautious about your advice. Kerosene is a mixture of hydrocarbon compounds.

I don't want you in my email. That has nothing to do with the fact that you make false statements here and don't defend them [I asked for a reference to support your claim], but try to twist it into another topic about preference for privacy.
Once more ...Do you have any reference to your claim about using it instead of castor oil [which is a carbohydrate]? If not, you still need to change your reply to avoid giving people dangerous advice. I'll admit that if they take your advice they're not the sharpest knife in the drawer, but you'd still be culpable. What you offer is dangerous advice. Also, even "small enough amounts" add to large amounts if taken over a period of time,as is done with castor oil. Which reminds me, again, how small is "small enough" without getting philosphical about it?
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No, it's a triglyceride, a bonding of one glycerol and three fatty acids (two of oleic acid and one of palmitic acid, for olive oil for example). Carbohydrates are things like sugars and starches.
Note that vegetable oils *do* become slightly carcinogenic when heated beyond their "smoke point".
Fatty acids and gasoline have remarkably similar chemical formulas:
Fatty Acid:
H H H O | | | | H-C-C-...-C-C-OH | | | H H H
Gasoline:
H H H H | | | | H-C-C-...-C-C-H | | | | H H H H
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Can't argue with that. The point is that hydrocarbon compounds are generally toxic and carcinogenous.

But then the chemical structure has been changed, and it is not what it was. Breaking and reforming bonds is all the difference in the world, and you must know that even seemingly small differences in chemical structure can make all of the difference in the human chemical factory, which takes us back to the main point again.
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If one knows their chemistry , they would know that diesel,gasoline and kerosene is all made from crude oil ,which is a prehistoric remains of oils from plant/animal materials which over time has aged to crude waiting for us to find it and put it to good use. On a side note the first successful internal combustion engine was built in Germany in the 1880's and the inventor was named Diesel but the engine ran off of either peanut oil or vegetable oil but they found out later it worked better with a refined crude that we all now know as diesel fuel
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On Wed, 09 Mar 2005 19:22:02 -0500, Guess who wrote:

No, vegetable OIL is a hydrocarbon. Go away, you idiot.
--
"Keep your ass behind you"
vladimir a t mad scientist com
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So is castor oil.
--
"The thing about saying the wrong words is that A, I don't notice it, and B,
sometimes orange water gibbon bucket and plastic." -- Mr. Burrows
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Guess who wrote:

You mean hydrocarbon products like estrogen and testosterone? A "hydrocarbon" is any substance composed of hydrogen and carbon--there are many hydrocarbons which are produced naturally in the human body. Some are toxic, some are pretty much inert, some have very specific effects necessary to life.
--
--John
to email, dial "usenet" and validate
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On Wed, 09 Mar 2005 16:43:14 -0500, Guess who wrote:

Some of them are, anyway. The cyclics are nasty, in general. The aliphatics aren't so bad.
--
"Keep your ass behind you"
vladimir a t mad scientist com
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Robert Bonomi wrote:

it
and is great as a lubricant for "oil-sharpening" stones. In fact, IIRC Krenov used it. I've used it with the carborundum rough grey stones and it works a treat.

don't
evaporation
with
used
I grew up with kero-fueled refrigerators, lamps and stoves. The old pressure lamps worked a treat with it. Back in those days in the middle of Africa there wasn't another readily accessible and cheap source of power aside from petrol.

"medicinal"
In Portugal, not too many years ago it was used to help people with a persistent cough. In cases of TB, asthma and others. Swallowed a couple of mouthfulls of it as a kid (mid 1950s) when I got into the fridge tank. Didn't harm much. Would I survive it again? Most likely not: OH&S being what it is nowadays, some well-intentioned moron has probably added poison to kero to make it unpalatable or disgusting, for "safety" reasons...

for
Yup. It is great on wheelnuts to make sure they don't "stick". And I do remember seeing it used on rags at the school in the machine shop, for all sorts of "quick wipes". It is a great "rust stopper": leaves an oily residue.
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.........snip....

Ummm, would there be a *reason* you know all this detailed information? [just askin'] :-)
Let's just say experience and pain are wonderful educators. :-) Fortunately this lesson was light on the pain.
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