Wet or Dry Rag to Wipe off Excess Glue

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I was clamping some tenons and wiped away the excess glue with a dry rag. I worry a little about how the thin residue of glue might affect the finish. But I also read some time ago not to use a wet rag because it causes problems with raising the grain.
What's the definitive choice? To wet or not to wet?
Thanks,
s
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sam wrote:

The _definitive_ choice is use less glue so eliminate squeeze out... :)
The alternative is to finish or wax surface first so glue doesn't soak into wood fibers.
As for cleanup when neither of above applies (my usual scenario by the way) I use damp, not wet nor dry...
--
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Or to tape off the joint before assembly.
R
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On Wed, 11 Aug 2010 19:50:42 -0700 (PDT), RicodJour

I use the tape method too and it works well. Just remember, if you're not careful with the tape you'll either end up with glue you will have to sand or scrape off or you'll end up with some tape caught in the joint.
Be careful out there.
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Wait for the glue to set for an hour and then scrape it off with a chisel.
D) ALL of the above.
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"sam" wrote:

-------------------------------------- 1) Use less glue.
2) Apply glue with a plumber's acid brush with the bristles trimmed back to about 1/2".
3) Tape joints with blue painter's tape. Do not use cream colored masking tape.
4) Rinse away excess glie with a water soaked plumber's acid brush, then wipe dry. Repeat as required.
Mastering 1 & 2 above eliminates the need for 3 & 4.
Lew
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And you can usually get the brushes in bundles of 20 or so quite cheaply. Good for a bunch of small brush tasks. Used nothing but for gluing for the past 20 years or so.
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says...

All good info. Thanks everyone.
s
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Totally agree and might I add, use or white TB or white Gorilla glue on lighter woods, TB III on medium colored brown woods, and dark tint glue on dark woods. I try to never use yellow glue.
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On Thu, 12 Aug 2010 08:27:05 -0500, Leon wrote:

Is this a common practice? The only time I've even seen a glue line is when the glued pieces weren't jointed properly.
Maybe I'm clamping too tight and staving the joint, but I've never had any weakness in the joints.
I'm curious about what others think on this issue.
--
Intelligence is an experiment that failed - G. B. Shaw

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It is for me. While I usually do not have a problem with excess glue I really do not try to remove or worry about some slight squeeze out in hard to get are areas. Inside cabinets web frames, bottoms of boxes, inside through DT joints and box joints, etc. In those cases I use the color that matches the best.
IMHO there are times that certain glue squeeze out is not worth removing but going with a color to help hide any that may appear works out well.

If you have entirely coated the surfaces with glue you can clamp to you hearts content, there will be no glue starvation. 30 years ago I clamped our oak dresser top so tightly that the bar clamps left very noticable impressions on the edges. I trimmed the edges to clean that up. The dresser looks as good today and has held up exceptionally well.
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"Leon" wrote:

----------------------------------------- With the availability of high quality laminating epoxy which BTW, cures clear and bridges gaps adding strength in the process, why would anybody use overpriced, under peckered Gorilla glue?
Lew
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"Cuz it has a cute monkey on the label?
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It _is_ awesome glue. but one bitch to work with..... sticky foamy bitch to work with....(with which to work?) So ifn when you're going through all the hassle, why NOT epoxy? I mended a couple of 1 x 6 cedar planks in a distant neighbour's fence, as a temporary measure, 5 years ago? Still there. Still full strength. HE claims a domestic disturbance. *I* claim he should have just paid that Michigan hooker beFORE she drove her Cavalier through that fence...... yup, Cavalier...high class.
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On 8/12/10 5:15 PM, Robatoy wrote: *I* claim he should have

So much for buy American. :-)
--
Froz...


The system will be down for 10 days for preventive maintenance.
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wrote:

We have a Casino here in Point Edward.... and Michigan is not exactly doing that well.... hence the influx of 'working girls'...much more now than ever before.
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Notice I said "white" Gorilla glue. That glue is relatively inexpensive and i have had no issues with it. IIRC about $4~$5 for a 16 oz container.
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Gorilla is a brand name, not a type of glue. They do make a PVA. I'm sure that is what he meant.
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What I meant and actually what I said. ;~)
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If you do use epoxy, remember that unlike wood glue, it does not like to be clamped extreeeemely tight. Starvation will hurt epoxy strength, easily.
--
Jim in NC



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