VOTE: 45-degree corners


http://members.toast.net/cnt/corner45.htm
How do you do yours? OR How would you do it if you came across to this?
I have been using plan B for long time. Then yesterday a friend told me that his WW'ing company does plan A all the time. I would prefer plan A (makes the raised panels even on both sides), but plan B would be stronger? This is about using biscuits and glue.
Chuck
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Maybe I'm missing something... but it's not at all clear to me what the illustrations represent, or what you're asking. Please explain further.
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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It's 3/4" thick lumber, with one cut at 45-degree on both sides. Then glued all together. This makes a "safer" corner rather a sharp pointing edge.
I am asking which would be stronger (obvious Plan A), but was told that one company does Plan B, so just wondering.
Chuck

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Maybe it's me, but I fail to see the relationship between those mitred corners and raised panels.
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The "un-mitred" lumber would be the raised panels. Otherwise, forget it.
Chuck

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Absolutely Plan A. With "A" you end up with the false corners that hide the actual joint. These can easily be put together with pocket hole screws if the inside will not show.
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I meant I used Plan A all along. Not Plan B...

Obvious Plan A would be "stronger", but was told that one company does Plan B, so just wondering.
As for using raised panels, I glue the RP onto the mitred cut, then sand it. This will leave one side "2-1/2" and other "2-3/4" looks. I know I could adjust the stiles to compensate... should I? Maybe not.
Hmm, in case you looking at this in a different way, I am looking at the 45-degree corners for the outside, while the inside would be hidden.

I still like using biscuits. I use pocket hole occasionally.
Chuck
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With that kind of corner and joint the biscuits are OK but the pocket holes pull the joint up tighter and more easily. It is often hard to clamp that type corner joint .
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Plan C (22.5-degree cuts on each)
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Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

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Add my vote to that to.
Bill
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Why? I think it's OK idea, was there a reason for that? Pocket holes?
Chuck
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On 7/15/2005 12:11 AM alexy mumbled something about the following:

Definitely, neither A nor B seem even remotely correct.
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Odinn
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wrote:

Hi Chuck,
I never thought of anything like plan "A" until I bought a Kreg PS jig about 2 weeks ago. It made a lot of sense to me for my current project where the back side is not visible (as shown in their owners booklet).
One thing is certain. It requires cutting only one angle at something other than 90, so if you're trying to fit some trim, you are only working with one edge.
Don't think that it's perfect for every situation, but it's a good solution in some.
Lou
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