Very weird frame joinery... (w/pics)

Hello everyone,
My Dad called me on the phone and asked me to make him a frame this weekend. He said he had a sample and wanted me to make one just like it. What I expected and what he had were two very different things. I expected some odd profile he wanted reproduced on the router table, but instead what he wanted was a very specific method of joinery.
I have no idea what this joint is called. It is a non-glued frame that you drive wedges into to expand.
I wasn't exactly sure how to make it, but I was up for the challenge. This is my first one, and he wants a couple more.
Check out the pics,
http://www.federatedtool.com/david/img/sframe1.jpg
http://www.federatedtool.com/david/img/sframe2.jpg
http://www.federatedtool.com/david/img/sframe3.jpg
Can you guess what it is for?
Thanks for looking,
David.
Every Neighbourhood has one, in Mine I'm Him
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On Apr 9, 12:04 am, "David F. Eisan"

Canvas for painting?
What do I win?
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On Apr 8, 11:04 pm, "David F. Eisan"

I have seen this type of joint used on a frame used for silkscreening tee-shirts. Such a frame is totally utilitarian and appearance is irrelevant. It must be sturdy since silk or nylon fabric is stretched quited tightly across the frame. Sometimes that joint is called a tenoned mitre. It can also be constructed using a splined mitre.
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David F. Eisan wrote:
| Can you guess what it is for?
He (or a friend) is fixin' to stretch some canvas.
-- Morris Dovey DeSoto Solar DeSoto, Iowa USA http://www.iedu.com/DeSoto/solar.html
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Those are stretcher bars
http://www.fineartstore.com/cgistore/store.cgi?page=/new/catalog.html&setup=1&ida 922&idp=0&his=0&cart_id=_WYItUMcMJAQJ9Pc6.2580
They are machine made. You buy the pieces the length you need.
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----
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>I have no idea what this joint is called. It is a non-glued frame that you
>drive wedges into to expand.
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On Apr 9, 12:04 am, "David F. Eisan"

Stretchers for canvas/linen.
Is your Dad pulling your leg? Reason I'm asking is that the stretchers are not that expensive and unless you're making a lot of them you probably won't beat the price by all that much - particularly if you're using good wood like you should be using and you place some value on your time. Here's a homemade example on eBay: http://cgi.ebay.com/New-36-x-24-Artist-Wood-Canvas-Stretcher-Frame-Bars_W0QQitemZ330102263884 That guy is building them with knotholes. The stretchers should be kiln dried and straight-grained to prevent warping. Here's a place that sells a couple of different models of stretcher bars for very reasonable prices: http://artistcraftsman.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Store_Code S&Category_Code=STR
R
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On Sun, 8 Apr 2007 21:04:50 -0700, "David F. Eisan"

Stretcher joint. Some people say it's not even a joint, because it falls apart if you don't have the canvas in palce over them.
I posted details of my jigs for making them ages ago. They're two sliding table saw sleds (one for the mitres, one for the laps) and you might need a dado blade that's 1/4 the thickness of the stock.
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Could be a nice solid joint if one was to pin them together with a through dowel or something similar.
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The joint is designed to allow movement so that the canvas can be stretched taut by the wedges. Pinning the joint would prevent that movement. It is a nice joint, though - too bad it's always hidden. I wonder what the Japanese version would look like...probably something that would give Escher a headache.
R
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I

Rubrik thrown in. Can only be made with a $ 10,000.00 chisel. =0)
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wrote in message

Yeah you do not want to do that. It would be like building a nice wooden drawer slide and then gluing the drawer slide halves together. ;~) It is not suppose to be stationary joint.
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