V-Drum Sander - Any experiences/advice?

At the woodworking show in Indy this weekend, I saw a Sand-Flee drum sander, and a similar kit from a Canadian company called Stockroom supply (https://www.stockroomsupply.com/VSander.asp ).
I was impressed by the simplicity of these machines and the fact they don't kick up a lot of dust. For the dust they do generate, you can easily attach a shop-vac to gather it.
As I watched the demonstrations, I was thinking maybe this could be used in place of a jointer to get one face and one edge flat to reference on the planer and table saw rip fence. Seems like with a good flat table (such as 3/4 MDF with a laminate) and a fence, it should do the same job as a jointer. Also seems like it'd be safer since spinning sandpaper would give you a little scuff but not lop off fingers.
I talked to Kelly Mehler about it after one of his demos. He said I still needed a jointer, although he admitted he didn't have any experience with the Sand-Flee/V-drum sanders. I respect Kelly and enjoy his tablesaw book and DVD, but really wanted to know more about why I need a jointer over a setup like this.
Other than speed, are there other things a jointer would give me that would make it a better choice? I'm mainly thinking in terms of dimensioning rough lumber.
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I built one of these before anyone even offered the whole machine. About 6 or 7 years ago a fellow out of Canada was selling just the roller and you had to put one together yourself. I built a "floor model" out of MDF, some pillow blocks, a vbelt and a 1/4 hp motor. It worked fine and, you are right, it does a good job containing its dust even without a dust collector (although I hooked one up to it).
Probably the question more appropriate would be "do I need a drum sander if I have one of these?" It really would be a poor man's drum sander. It would take a long time to do what a drum sander does with a sand flee, but it is a good way to touch up small parts and could work as a drum sander. When I built my arts and crafts bed:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v384/eganders/DSCF2075.jpg
I used the sand flee to do the balustrades you see on the headboard and footboard. It worked very well.
I don't use it very much any more. Probably should give it a try again, but I have a drum sander now and it just seems easier to use that.
I guess I would like to hear what some other people do with their's. Does anyone else have one that also has a drum sander? What do you find yourself using it for?
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Gee.
I just looked at your URL to the Stockroom Supply site. I guess I just repeated what they said! I think this is the guy that I bought mine from. Again, I can't see using it for a jointer. You have to be careful and push it through the sander in an even, smooth stroke otherwise you could end up with a ripple surface.
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Thanks for the response. I was thinking about that, too. You'd have to be careful to keep the work moving. I bought one of the kits, just need to pick up a motor and then assemble everything. I'll try it and post back to the group with my experience.
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BTW, how much did you pay for everything including motor etc?

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I paid $135 for the kit, which didn't include a motor. It had the drum, bearings, link belt, pulleys, two rolls of sandpaper, and some plans to make a cabinet for it. I've looked a little on Ebay for a motor, they don't seem too expensive. They say to use 1/4 HP up to 1/2 HP, 1725 RPM motor. They said at the show TEFC is not necessary, but a sander's job is to make dust, and dust always seems to go where you don't want it, so I'll probably hold out for TEFC.
Another booth sold one called the Sand Flee, all put together including a Baldor 1/3 HP motor. Also had stainless steel table and extruded aluminum fence, but they wanted $499 as the show special price, plus $50 shipping (they didn't have them at the show, would ship to you afterwards). For that price, figured I'd tinker with the kit.
WD wrote:

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Thanks for the information. I have spent hours looking at the possibility making a drum sander, Including Stockroom Supply V-Drum Sander. I juggled with various possibility and found it would cost above $400.
Just before Christmas I bought a brand new drum sander at Ebay. it's look like a Performax 16/32, I believe it is a discontinued 1 hp Ryobi 16/32. You might want to take a look at the seller website. His name is Tom, a honest and friendly Ebay seller for woodworking machine.
http://www.woodwrighttools.com/store/product_info.php?products_id8
Disclaimer, I have no relation with the seller, I'm just a satisfier buyer.

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Oops, I forgot to add that, I will be writing a review of this Drum Sander shortly.

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I made a floor version of the V-drum sander a while back from parts that I got second hand and parts that I bought from Stockroom supply and a used 1/2 hp motor that I had laying around.
I've thanked that little machine every time I've used it and I use it on just about every project now.
Rob
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http://www.robswoodworking.com

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