Using stainless all thread in large cutting board?

Page 2 of 3  
On 12/8/2015 8:42 AM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

It depends on how you will make and or use the cutting board. End grain up, there is going to be movement to some degree every time you clean it. Edge grain not so much. Just keep in mind that a cutting board that is going to be used is going to develop its own character and will not be perfect as cleaning with water does introduce some water into the wood. Just be sure to let it dry after cleaning and wipe off excess water.
Nothing looks better than a cutting board that gets used and has the battle scars to prove that it is good enough to use.
Kinda like a New table saw top, take measures to protect it but don't spend more time protecting it than using it.

The poly glues are messy, I will give you that. BUT a water proof wood glue is just as good and only has to be applied to one side also, and much less expensive.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 8 Dec 2015 06:42:26 -0800 (PST) snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

does not matter with kiln dried it remains pretty darn stable

if it works why not and if you already have some all the better
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Electric Comet wrote:

Kiln dried doesn't stay at whatever relative humidity to which it was deied, it assumes the RH of wereever it is.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 8 Dec 2015 12:53:10 -0500

it is not going to matter with a small project like this
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Yes. A couple of weeks or more before you use it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/8/2015 9:42 AM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I have cutting boards I made 40 years ago and use every single day that were glued up with Elmer's Cabinetmakers glue (yellow glue) I still use that stuff but now also use Titebond III, which is waterproof or water resistant. The Elmer's is not water proof at all but on a cutting board, with tight joints, it doesn't seem to matter much. I would use Titebond III today, it's a nice glue, cheap, easy to use.
If I were gluing up something to store outside in the weather, I guess I'd go out and buy Titebond III, otherwise, use whatever you have, it will likely work, that's what I did 40 years ago and no problems whatsoever. If it comes apart, find a woodworker to repair it (you?).
--
Jack
Add Life to your Days not Days to your Life.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 09 Dec 2015 10:31:21 -0500

i doubt the stuff frmo 40 years ago is formlated the same today
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I use it indoors. Ever hear of 80% RH after a flood or Rainstorm ? We can open up the door and have to wait for the dehydrator works.
My sister has water sprinklers that blew out with an over pressure on the water line. The furniture all but melted. doors off and falling down. Oh - they were at the mountain cabin for a week. Came back with 2" of water in the house and a flood pouring out ever where. It was a massive insurance claim the insurance man did - they installed a pressure regulator on the house as well.
Martin
On 12/9/2015 9:31 AM, Jack wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
One other thing, I will have to somehow plane the final product without my planer as it will be too wide. Has anyone ever successfully planed something completely flat where it will not rock on a countertop with a few boards and a router?
On Monday, December 7, 2015 at 11:51:21 AM UTC-6, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/8/2015 8:44 AM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Just be careful when gluing up the sections that will fit in the planer, use dowels, biscuits, or Domino's for registration of the mating surfaces to create the final size.
Then use a ROS or belt sander to finish off.
I Typically a kitchen towel under the cutting board will help prevent rocking if it is warped.
I also use the clear rubber/silicone cabinet door bumpers in the bottom of the cutting boards. I use the 1/2" diameter by 1/8" thick style. I drill a 1/2" diameter flat bottom hole on the 4 corners just deep enough to prevent the bumpers from slipping and relocating.
Then I test on the counter top and gently hand sand the bumper that stands tall.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Although, if I recall correctly, the OP mentioned that both sides of the board were required to be usable.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/8/2015 10:10 AM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

Yeah, I forgot about that. Just use a Kitchen towel between it and the counter top if there is an issue.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 8 Dec 2015 06:44:51 -0800 (PST) snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

glue it up so you have two halves that will fit in your planer once you have them equal thickness do the final glue up
just keep it flat and do not clamp too tight
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/8/2015 9:44 AM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Sure, it's not that hard. I work across the grain, knocking the high spots down.
Test, repeat. Keep marking , work slowly. You only need to keep taking the high spots down.
Once it's flat, a light pass with a smoother to remove all the scars. Rinse and repeat on the other side. Also, to prevent edge tearout, put a chamfer on the edges before starting. It prevents you from blowing out an edge.
--
Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/8/2015 9:44 AM, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

flat where it will not rock on

If you plane both halves with a planer, you should have no trouble gluing them up with nothing more than a bit of sanding as both sides should be equal thickness. If you need to plane it again with a router, something is really, really wrong. A light sanding or just a card scraper is all you should need.
--
Jack
Add Life to your Days not Days to your Life.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Back on the topic of glue and stainless rods, I have a cabinet maker buddy that makes and sells cutting boards with his scraps. He swears he makes as much on his boards as he does the cabinets...
He uses "Eco Glue" and has for about 10 years. He warrants his cutting boa rds again separation at the joints for life! He has been using it in his b usiness for about 20 years and he told me over time he has just gotten bett er with a couple of reformulations.
He told me that since he switched to that, he has NEVER had a joint fail th at he glued with Eco Glue, not a cutting board, counter top or cabinet.
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/9/2015 9:47 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Rovert, could that be Eco-Bond Adhesives?
http://ecobondadhesives.com/
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/9/2015 11:24 AM, Leon wrote:

Or maybe this.
http://www.thegreenproductscompany.com/adhesive/egwood.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wednesday, December 9, 2015 at 11:30:25 AM UTC-6, Leon wrote: .

It's this one. Bill (the cabinet guy) is a cranky, hard headed man that ha s to see it, test it, use it, and develop a history with something before h e will recommend it. He completely swears by it, and while drinking a beer with him, he gave me the run down on his testing methods.
To shock test, he glued two pieces of wood together, and bashed the joint w ith a carpenter's hammer until the wood splintered and came apart. The glu ed joint survived.
For stress, he used a "come along" or something similar to rip the glued wo od apart.
He has soaked his glued test pieces in wood, and the glue joints never gave up.
I confess I personally have never used it as I don't know of anyone that se lls it locally, but if I was building a lot, I would sure be looking into i t. Look at the strength tests and comparisons on the page you posted; that stuff is mighty impressive.
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/9/2015 11:41 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

What kind of wood did he soak his glue tests in? '~)

Yes I had noticed the strength tests, Roo Wood seems to be the only one that comes close. But having said that I was surprised to see that several of the glues have as much strength as wood, if not more, when bonding glass and steel.
I probably use as much glue as most anyone on this forum but I learned the hard way with TB that there is a shelf life on this stuff and especially with TBIII you have to keep it mixed. I used to buy it and the Extend a gallon at a time and just over half way the stuff became useless. I wonder at what price it can be purchased and what the shelf life is.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.