Tyvek flammable?

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Is Tyvek flammable?
I have a wall in my shop with uncovered fiberglass insulation. I don't want to drywall it right now, and I know plastic burns very quickly. Tyvek was a thought to cover it.
Barry
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Throw up some OSB or cheap paneling. Wilson

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On Tue, 23 Nov 2004 00:10:20 GMT, "Wilson Lamb"

The wall has a million penetrations and runs behind a furnace. If I was wanting to work with sheets, I'd simply drywall it. <G>
Barry
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I think your best bet is to use foil faced kraft paper. This is what is used as a vapor barrier/fire supressor/ insulator around the framing in fireplaces. Plus, it's less expensive than tyvek.--dave

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Barry,
Try spelunking around tyvek.com ... I looked quickly and didn't see flammability.
But, since it's used to wrap houses, I'd hope it's not flammable.
Regards, JT
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On Tue, 23 Nov 2004 00:12:54 +0000 (UTC), John Thomas

Maybe it's time to weasel a tyvek envelope out of the USPS and light it.
I was trying to find this out before I bought a roll of housewrap, figuring some here has tried to light it already. <G>
Eventually, I'll cover the wall with something more substantial, but this could quickly cover it for now.
Thanks, Barry
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wrote:

Depends on your insurance. If you have insurance it will probably require drywall installed.
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Does anyone know what this means?
"Flammability: Typically has a spread index of 0 and a smoke developed value of 25 when tested in accordance ASTM E-84-89a."
Anybody a Fire Marshal? <G>
Thanks! Barry
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I found this at http://graphics.dupont.com/userguide/whats_special.shtml
------------------------------ UNIQUE FLAMMABILITY The flammability characteristics of Tyvek are similar to those of most synthetic fibers. When exposed to a flame, Tyvek shrinks away rapidly. It will melt at 275F (135C), and its auto-ignition temperature is 750F (400C). Please refer to the MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheet) for additional information on the characteristics of Tyvek brand of protective materials. Hard structure products are rated class "A" when tested in accordance with ASTM E-84-89a, a test for flame and smoke development.
Soft structure products are rated "Class 1-Normal Flammability" by the Federal Flammable Fabrics Act for Clothing Textiles (16 CFR-1610). Tyvek with flame-retardant coatings are available through distributors. -----------------------------
Jim
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On 22 Nov 2004 16:42:34 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@woodworkersworkshop.com wrote:

Thanks.
That sounds like it's a lot less flammable than most plastics.
Barry
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Ba r r y wrote:

Read the rest of it--the part about "soft structure".

--
--John
Reply to jclarke at ae tee tee global dot net
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On Tue, 23 Nov 2004 00:46:24 GMT, Ba r r y

But it doesn't sound like it would be good for your application: If the Tyvek shrinks away in flame, that means what you covered up will be exposed to the flame; if it's flammable, you may as well not have bothered with the Tyvek.
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On Mon, 22 Nov 2004 21:41:56 -0700, Mark & Juanita

Pink fiberglass with no vapor barrier and raw studs, which have been uncovered for 13 years. That's why the shrinkage would be acceptable, compared at what might happen with other plastic or paper products.
Any other suggestions for a quick cover up until I can get a real wallcovering up next summer? I was figuring Tyvek, because I need a vapor barrier anyhow, and I could leave it up when the real cover up is installed.
My long-term plan is to put up a solid surface, like plywood over most of the wall, with drywall around the furnace. The solid stuff will make it easy to attach hardware to. This wall currently has an insane number of pipe, vent, and cable penetrations, and I'm not in the mood to deal with it right now.
Thanks, Barry
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http://construction.tyvek.com/en/constrSystems/remodelers/remodelerFAQs.shtml
#4: Is Tyvek a vapor barrier? No.
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Thanks! I missed that, always thinking of the stuff as a vapor barrier.
Barry
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Glad someone finally mentioned this.
My suggestion - put the drywall up where the heat is supplied, use whatever dust barrier you feel comfortable with elsewhere.
Ba r r y wrote:

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wrote:

Tyvek isn't a vapor barrier, it's intentionally a vapor _passing_ membrane. It's a wind barrier, nothing more.
Dave Hinz
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I know that now. <G>
I think I'm just going to move the real wall covering project up a few slots and get it over with. It's about a 30 x 7 1/2' wall, and I don't think there's a 4 foot section without either a penetration, or something like a stove pipe support.
Thanks, everyone! Barry
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wrote:

Actually, you knew it before I wrote my post, I just hadn't read ahead that far ;)
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Unless you have a buddy that builds houses and can bring you some scraps, or you can buy a partial roll somewhere, Tyvek runs $100+ a roll. --dave

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