Tung Oil Curing time

Hi,
I have a project which I finished with Tung oil. For the first coat, I slopped it on, let it soak in (end grain swallowed tons!) and wiped off after 10 min.
It seems like the finish is taking a long time to cure. It's been at least 4 days, and I get some slight shinyness on my fingers when I touch the surface of the wood. My impression was that this stuff cured in 48 hours or so.
- Daniel
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Next time do not slop it on.
JJ
Daniel wrote:

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Well, the directions usually say "flood," so a thinking man might figure the fault lays in the "wipe dry" section of same. Then, of course there may be a temperature problem this time of year, coupled with the reluctance of "pure" tung oil to take on oxygen rapidly anyway.
If it's still lying sticky on the surface, rub it off vigorously with solvent and abrasive, put the piece where it's warm but not hot enough to make the oil flow, and remember next time to wipe off any shiny areas over and over until they no longer shine.

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At the time of application I did wipe all the excess (unabsorbed) oil until the surface was matte. But after 4 days of curing time, the surface still transfers small amounts of oil onto my fingers when picking the workpiece up, and will transfer small amounts of oil onto paper towels if I use them to pick up the workpiece.
The surface is not sticky, just soft and slightly most, nowhere near the somewhat "durable" that I'm expecting. I am sure it will turn hard after a few weeks, but that's a long time to wait for each coat if one wants to build up 5 coats of pure tung.

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Without driers to hasten the process and in cool weather, the oil should be applied in very light coats. When the temp gets over 80 you can slop it on.
JJ
Daniel wrote:

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Jeremy is right. I get good results with tung and linseed oils when it is at least 70 degrees (21 C) in the shop. Drying time multiplies 3-5 times at 60, so I use a space heater in the winter. Helps to have humidity below 50%, too (requiring a dehumidifier in the summer - basement shop).
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