TS won't cut square! Please help a newbie...

Ho'kay. I have a Griz 1022 contractor's saw that I've been trying to setup for far too long now. I just can't get it to rip square, table to blade. The blade sure *looks* square to the table. I even ran out and bought an Incra Guaranteed Square. Still can't get the sucker to cut square.
Table looks flat enough. I don't have a decent straight-edge, but with what I do have, there appears to be about a .004 dip in the middle of the table. But since I'm squaring to that dip, so to speak, I'd expect to get much closer to square than I'm able to manage.
I removed the insert for the last few test rips, just in case it was throwing things off. (Don't try this at home...)
I've been using thin-kerf blades (an inexpensive Freud and a WWII) with a blade stiffener thus far. About the only thing I can think of to try is a full-kerf blade. Anyone have any ideas?
--
Thanks,
Joe Wells
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Joe Wells wrote:>Ho'kay. I have a Griz 1022 contractor's saw that I've been trying to setup

You might check the straightness of your fence first, but then get the table square to the blade. Use a cheap square that you can adjust the blade length on, set the body along the miter track, hold it firmly to the inner edge of the track, and slide the blade 'til it just almost barely touches the near edge of a marked tooth on the sawblade.Tighten down the square. Measure the gap 'tween the end of the square blade and the sawtooth with a set of feeler gauges, then slide the square up to the other end of the blade, and rotate the blade 'til the same tooth measured earlier arrives at your square. Measure again. Compare the measurements. Move the trunnion or the tabletop (whichever your saw requires) a bit, tighten it back down and measure it all again. Rinse. Repeat. You'll get it. Then, make sure your _flat_ fence is aligned to the miter slot also.Tom Someday, it'll all be over....
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Try removing the insert plate, cranking the blade all the way up, then putting one edge of the square against the iron surface, and the other edge on the blade body such that it isn't touching any teeth. Then make it square.

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Two thoughts come to mind.
1) How good's the wood? If it has a twist or a bow that you follow, it won't be square on the edge. It'll bind and burn a bit, too, so let that be a warning.
2) A lot of times the insert isn't flush to the table, and the best square available won't do a good job measuring if it's elevated at one end. This is one that gets the kids at school all the time.
I grew up in a house with a Sears 8" tablesaw and steel blades, so I always plan for, and take one squaring/smoothing pass on the jointer after the cut, whether I need it or not. Note, that if 1) above pertains, it still won't happen.
Third thought - tilt lock's not creeping, is it?

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The guard on my G1022 was out just enough that it pulled the wood away from the fence. It was very mystifying until I figured it out.
-- Mark
Joe Wells wrote:

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