try square question

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A curiosity about try or "classic" type of square like this one at Amazon: (Amazon.com product link shortened)89384034/sr=1-6/ref=sr_1_6/102-9208339-5187338?v=glance&s=hi
I notice some do and some don't have measurement markings... will someone explain why on earth some would not have them?
Thanks all,
Alex
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A square without markings would be used for machinery setup, squaring wood and glue ups etc.
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Some people use the square to square things and or make square marks or lines. I personally never use the markings on the square. The same could be asked why anyone would use a rule to draw a straight line. This may go back to the way Drafting is/was formally taught. You never use a measuring tool to draw lines.
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That all makes sense, I need a good tutorial on it, I'll get there. A drafter's T is for drawing lines. Alex
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wrote:

Or a straightedge, although the T is [was] more commonly used.
Bill.
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I can't comment on the Footprint square, but I have about 4 try squares in various sizes and except for one, I've been disappointed in their accuracy. I now use only my Starret combination square. I would never buy one that I couldn't check for squareness prior to purchase.

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Well, with me knowing my impulse ratings, that is a good thought and good advice for me to discipline myself with. But I have nothing to check one with, and the only square in town I can find is a current Stanley, sells for $17.xx, steel rule part does have measurement, wood and brass. Looks cheap too.
Alex
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wrote:

Sure you do. Remember the "perpendicular bisector" construction in semi-formal geometry? One straightedge, one pair of compasses, one sharp pencil, and you have all you need to draw a right angle and any number of other angles and constructs. These are theoretically, and if tools are good practically dead on exact. Check against that.
Bill.
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AArDvarK wrote:

You check it against itself. Place against edge, use it as guide to draw line perpendicular to edge. Flip square over. See if it lines up with the line you drew. If it does then it's square, if it doesn't then it's not.

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Most places selling squares will have a flat surface somewhere close where you can verify your desired purchase against a minimum of three others. If you think about it, take a piece of ply with a straight edge with you and use the line compare method or the 3,4,5 method to check for 90 degrees.
Irregularities in the edge can be fettled out, as can out of square, but why start at the bottom when you can start at the top?

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On Fri, 09 Jul 2004 10:09:58 -0500, Lowell Holmes wrote:

The fixed squares (try-squares ... there are different types of squares [ box and cylinder come quickly to mind]) are intended to be calibrated / corrected by the user.
I'll leave it to the reader to figure out how this is done.
Bill
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Try squares are handy to just grab and "check for 90" (ensure things are at right angles). Not a couple of things about try squares - (1) many are only claimed sqaure on one face (the side with the brass) and (2) their precision varies.
E.g. Ppl have reported their Incra try sqaures accurate; a few have said not. I'm not going to mail order any instrument that's supposed to be precise -- unless it's a Starrett (or similar brand I've grown to trust.)
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A square is often used to only verify 90 degrees. Think machining.
Wes
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Whiskey Echo Sierra Sierra AT Gee Tee EYE EYE dot COM
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First thing the picture in the link is of a regular square not a tri-square. A tri square will have a face that is cut 45 degrees from the blade enabling you to mark out 45, 90 and 135 degree lines thus it name tri-square. http://www.brandnametools.biz/hand_tools/t/Tri_Squares/_1290112.htm As in the picture. You will usually find that the higher quality squares do not have easement lines on them because the stamping and etching of these lines causes distortion in the steel and you do not end up wit a true straight edge. Plus I personally would not rust them to be accurate at all for any thing other than basic framing.
Chris

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Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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Nope. The one in the picture IS a tri square. What you have described is a Combination square.
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The brandnametools people have mislabeled the Stanley 46-502 8" blade plastic Try/Mitre square
<http://www.stanleytools.com/default.asp?CATEGORY=SQUARES&TYPE=PRODUCT&PARTNUMBERF-502&SDesc=8%22+Blade+Plastic+Try%2FMitre+Square +(English)>
Never heard of a tri-square before.
scott
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Never heard of a tri-square before??? That was like 8th grade shop class 101... LOL

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On Fri, 09 Jul 2004 23:39:02 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

Got to come down on Scott's side in this mini (I hope) controversy. I've known about "try" squares for a long time, but this is my first exposure to a "tri" square.
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
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