trunnion trouble, or, why can't I adjust my tablesaw?

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Hi, folks,
Using lots of advice I've found on this group, I set about adjusting my Grizzly contractor tablesaw to correct its extreme blade heel problem--the back of the blade was over to the left at least 1/4 inch more than the front of the blade!
I loosened the two back trunnion bolts and whacked, to no avail.
I loosened one of the front ones--still no better.
I have now loosened all four.
The whole assemble is will move around, but it seems to be moving AROUND a point at the front of the blade. In other words, I can push the back of the blade (via the trunnions below) and move the assembly and the blade back and forth--but it's basically pivoting at the front of the blade.
Just moving the back doesn't make enough of a correction. I need to move the front one way and the back the other, but the front doesn't seem to want to move.
Can anyone offer any advice? Thanks!
DS
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This sound seems to show that the front trunnion is frozen in place.
You could try freeing the bolts by the use of a very long cheater. Sometimes bolts can be freed by heating them with a torch, but you might set the whole place on fire if there is any sawdust around. Sometimes, an impact wrench will loosen an otherwise stuck bolt.
Otherwise, you might succeed in getting the bolts out by turning the saw over (to keep things from falling down when you get the bolts loose enough).
Jim
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Are you sure you got all the bolts? On my new saw, I noticed it had 3 bolts in each trunnion compared to the two on my previous saw.
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I had the exact same problem with my Grizzly G0444Z saw as you, being 1/4" off and burning the wood when ripping. I previously posted it in this NG. I had a lot of trouble moving the trunnion. One person on this NG said that he put a large clamp on the back trunnion and brought it in by tightening the clamp. I did this too and was able to bring the blade in. I put a dial guage on the blade and the best I could acheive was it being 2,000th of and inch out. I was informed that was good enough. I been toying with the idea of taking the back trunnion off and elongating the 2 holes so that I could get it dead on. I may call Grizzly and see what they say. One thing you should look at is making sure that your fence is not out of alignment too. Some say the fence should be an 1/8th off in the back and others say it should be dead on. I put mine dead on. Take a look at this site http://www.in-lineindustries.com/saw_pals.html Ive been thinking of getting this item.
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So, when you "put a clamp on the back trunnion," what exactly did you clamp TO?
I'm glad to hear I'm not the only who has had this problem. I've talked to the folks at Grizzly and they've tried to be helpful, but they're giving me the basic troubleshooting tips that are in the manual, and don't seem to apply when the amount off is SO much.
(I have ordered a set of PALs--thanks for the tip.)
Thanks! ds
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I took a pipe clamp and put one end on the end of the trunnion and the other end on the on the side of the saw cabinet and tightened it .

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Again, How are you checking for alignment? If you are checking for alignment parallel with the miter slot, make sure you use the SAME spot on the blade for the front and back measurement. Mark the blade with a sharpie and take a measurement in the front then spin the blade positioning the sharpie spot in the back and remeasure.
What are you using to make these measurements?
--
Stoutman
www.garagewoodworks.com
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Thanks for the suggestions. Because the difference from front to back is so extreme (more than 1/4 inch), I haven't been very precise in my measurements. I'm trying to just get it in the ballpark before bothering with precision.
But to answer your question, I'm measuring with a stick clamped to the miter bar. The stick has a screw in the end. Not the ultimate in precision, I know, but good enough to get a least kinda close, I would hope.
ds
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If you really serious about getting your table saw aligned. Give this a try:
http://www.garagewoodworks.com/TS_aligner.htm
Disclaimer: No affiliation. Just a satisfied customer.
--
Stoutman
www.garagewoodworks.com
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Stoutman wrote:

I don't think his problen is being able to measure how far off it is .. .. he can't move it enough to get it in proper alignment .. .. how will a TS-Aligner help him with that ??
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Once he is able to move it, how is he going to align it? (the stick on a miter gauge technique gets you close; the TS-Aligner gets you there all the way!).
--
Stoutman
www.garagewoodworks.com
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One more thing. What do you mean by "proper alignment"? I am a little skeptical that his saw was that out of wack before he started screwing with it.
How close to "proper alignment" can you get with the stick on a miter gauge technique? 0.1" 0.01??? As little as 0.005" in error can adversely effect the quality of your cuts.
Was he using the same spot on the blade for the front and back measurements? If he wasn't, he is introducing even more error onto his "stick on a miter gauge" alignment method technique.
--
Stoutman
www.garagewoodworks.com
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Stoutman wrote:

Damn, Sam .. .. when you're talking about .250"+ discrepency, I wouldn't be too concerned with WHAT tooth he used .. UNLESS his blade is warped by that amount .. get real here. For what he's trying to accomplish here, a high-dollar alignment tool would be a waste of time and money. The ONLY thing a TS-Aligner would do is to more accurately inform him of the degree of his problem. Hell, I have one or two test indicators whose total travel is probably less than .250", but they are extremely accurate within their range. Maybe that's what he needs .. an indicator that reads in ten-thousandths of an inch .. .. that'll make his error appear 10 times greater .. .. AND it will be super-accurate !! !! !!
sheesh !!!
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Blade warp or highs and lows add to ANY error measurement, regardless of what tool he used.

He is trying to align his blade parallel (trunnion adjustment) with his miter gage slot. Why wouldn't you want to align it properly? Stick on a miter gage isn't the proper way of doing this. I really question the error he initially reported because of the method he acquired it.

This tool is far from "high-dollar". Geesh. How much did he spend on his TS? Blade?

You hit the nail right on the head.

NO!! It won't make his error appear 10 times greater. It will make his error reading more accurate.

Yes. Why not?

Geesh!
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UNLESS you take your measurements from the same spot on the blade.
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Agreed, to a point. All you really need to align the blade to the slot is a consistent reference point (provided by the screw on the stick on the gauge) and a set of feeler gauges. Tom
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Sorry to the TSaligner clan... Tom
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Shhh! There is no clan.

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Hehee, well it does require a "feel" for the drag created by the feeler gauge... Tom
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Using that technique, I can get it within .002, guaranteed. Likely closer. Indicator is faster though.

gauge
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