tried to fix armoire uh oh


Hello,
My wife and I just bought a brand new, beautiful, expensive armoire. It was delivered, but it was so deep that I had to take the molding off the door to get it into the bedroom. Anyways, when the guys brought it in, they still managed to have paint from the jamb rub onto the piece. The guys told me, "No big deal, just softly rub the paint with nail polish remover." OK, well, being the dummy I am, I tried it. The paint is gone, but so is the stain. I know have faded splotches where the paint used to be, and a rag with a bunch of stain on it. I did not even rub hard. Anyways, any ideas about how to fix this? The armoire is made of mahogoney
Thanks greg
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G. Doughty wrote:

Try Minwax Stain Markers or DAP Blend Sticks.
--Scott
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boorite wrote:

PS: If it looks like youre not going to get the results you want from the stain crayons and such, you probably just have to pay to have it repaired.
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We do have a great warranty. They will come out to the house and fix it . . . if it can be fixed that way. I REALLY don't want to try to move this behemoth. I will try the first options you suggested. It's only wood, right?
Thanks Greg ki4bbl

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<snip>
It's only wood,

Aaaaargh!!!! My ears -er eyes, my eyes!!!! THe gods of the forest and all worshipping Druids cringe at your profanity!!
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I wish it were as easy as that, but we spent too much money to just mean "it's just wood." I knew someone would cringe.

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If it can be fixed under warranty, don't touch it. Call them first. The treatment with the nail polish remover may have done in the warranty but, you never know. If they are willing to fix it, best to let them do it and not have to deal with any attempts you made. In other words, you may make it worse.

.
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s you want from

If this was brand new,and the retailer is a reputable firm, they should send someone out to fix it. Most retailers will do this.
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The odds of getting it to blend in is darn near zero. You really have to refinish it completely.
But... if it really is mahogany it should not be stained. I would try putting some boiled linseed oil on it and see if that works. Since nothing else will work, you have nothing to lose.
(I did stain mahogany last year. My wife wanted a table I just made match a 150 year old mahogany desk in the same room, so I had to stain it. It hurt.)
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Bad advice. The last thing he needs is something that soaks into the wood. If it doesn't work, it could very well screw up further attempts. Best bet is to ignore the advice given here and call the store that it was bought from. Likely it was sprayed with lacquer with a toner added. That seems pretty standard these days. Fast a cheap.

nothing
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Penetration of oil into mahogany is very superficial. It would certainly be removed with whatever removes the other finish.

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By definition, penetration is not superficial.
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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My wife may argue that with you...
Clint
wrote:

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wrote:

First lesson. Never, ever use nail polish remover as the first level of test solvent. Acetone (what it really is) is one of the more agressive of solvents, even more so than lacquer thinner.
Not only should the delivery guys's bosses (presumably the furniture dealer) be responsible for the repair, but the guy's boss who recommended the nail polish remover should take him aside for a corrective interview.
None of this should have fallen on you (including removing the molding).
K4QG
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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Second lesson... Test on a hidden area before attempting anything remotely risky on a frontal type area.
IOW, if you're going to continue mucking around, find a hidden area (bottom, back, etc), use the acetone to remove a tiny bit of the finish, and see if you can fix that BEFORE you have at the front.
Personally, I think the idea of trying to get the delivery company or original manufacturer to fix it is the best idea. But I wouldn't let anyone from the actual delivery company itself touch it before finding out exactly what they plan to do. Who knows, maybe the guy who gave you the bad advice in the first place learned everything he knows from his boss...
Clint

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wrote:

First, delivery to the place you wanted it put is their reponsibility. They got the paint onto it. A big disappointment to say the least, but that's also their responsibility. You say you bought a warranty with the armoire, that should have been what took care of the paint.
If this were mine, I'd be calling them to come fix it at this point. They might take pity on you and fix it without charge, especially since it was their guys that told you to do that. But they might not.
I had leather furniture delivered last January. A little early since we were promised February. Well, I had not yet painted were the furniture was placed. And in moving it around, I scuffed one corner pretty bad. Took the finish clean off the leather. They came by, saw what had happened, knew I did it, and fixed it anyway free of charge.
The bottom line: Even if you made the problem, they might take care of it anyway free of charge.
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Just for future reference, as LRod said, nail polish remover is acetone based - and a pretty strong solvent. It'll remove most finishes as well as dissolve many plastics and vinyls.
In the future if you have a scuff of latex paint to remove, use isopropyl alcohol or ammonia - that is, unless the finish is shellac.
--
Owen Lowe
The Fly-by-Night Copper Company
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Thank you for all the support. I am going to let the repair folks come out and take a look at it. It's a pretty comprehensive warranty. I just wish I would have thought about it prior to doing it. The way the delivery guys made it sound, a little nail polish remover or gasoline( they said that would work too) would take it right off. That's why I didn't think about it. We have some antique wood pieces that never needed any touch up, but nothing as new and nice as this. Usually I just try to fix it myself, but I am kicking myself now. Live and learn. Maybe in 20 years someone will write in with the same problem and I can help them out. Thanks folks for the interest and help. And also for not confirming my ignorance.
Greg ki4bbl
wrote:

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