transport of 16 foot 4x4's with stationwagon?

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On 1/16/2012 1:15 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote: ...

Same way as the guy w/ the station wagon--hook up the trailer.
--
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With my ranger 6' bed truck, I have 12" clearance from axle to ground and the truck is 15' long. I'd try the suggestion earlier to hang it from the front and back bumpers _under_ the truck. The posited 4x4 would still leave 8" ground clearance, which is more than many modern automobiles, an 18' maybe a 20' would even work this way. I probably wouldn't take this on the freeway or drive over 35 or 40 with it.
I do carry 10 - 12' boards in the 6' bed regularly - most recently some figured 12/4 8" wide eastern black walnut (sale: USD 5/bf at jackel enterprises - recommended).
scott
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On 16 Jan 2012 21:36:01 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote:

I might try that, but it sounds scary (suspension moving around under there). It is a Ranger 4x4 (that hasn't been in 4WD since I moved from Vermont to Alabama ;-).

10' is a piece of cake; don't even hang a flag. 12' is pushing it a little but not too bad. 16' is out of the question.
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On Wed, 18 Jan 2012 06:35:10 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

Why not? It is moving relative to the body (springs, shocks, axles, transfer case, drive shaft,...).

I'd thought about it, but was wondering about the suspension, since it *is* moving around down there.
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On Thu, 19 Jan 2012 07:04:20 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

But the suspension bits are still moving relative to the body.

...or springs, or axle, or...

4WD trucks (off-road) trucks tend to have a bit more clearance than a Miata. ;-)
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On 1/16/2012 1:15 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

stick them in the bed, then buy enough bags of sacrete to hold the front of them down. You'll use the sacrete some other time if not while putting these 4x4's in the ground. Don't forget the red rag on the end of the timbers.
--
Steve Barker
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On Mon, 16 Jan 2012 17:05:21 -0600, Steve Barker

Remember - a 6 foot box plus a tailgate is pretty close to 8 feet - so it doesn't take a LOT of weight to keep the front down..
I still like a ladder rack on a P'up for the job, though.
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On Mon, 16 Jan 2012 17:05:21 -0600, Steve Barker

With only six feet in and a whopping ten feet hanging out, cops would pull him over in a heartbeat around here, probably for the broken wood in the street a block back, if nothing else.
-- I merely took the energy it takes to pout and wrote some blues. --Duke Ellington
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On Mon, 16 Jan 2012 17:30:48 -0800, Larry Jaques

Put a skate board on the end instead of a flag and call it a trailer.
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On Mon, 16 Jan 2012 21:36:55 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I prefer a unicycle, with the proper caster set.
-- I merely took the energy it takes to pout and wrote some blues. --Duke Ellington
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YOUR cops have a heartbeat?
------------- "Larry Jaques" wrote in message
With only six feet in and a whopping ten feet hanging out, cops would pull him over in a heartbeat around here, probably for the broken wood in the street a block back, if nothing else.
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On Mon, 16 Jan 2012 14:15:39 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

Get yourself one of those ladder racks that sit on one side.
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On Mon, 16 Jan 2012 20:23:50 -0500, "Mike Marlow"

I carried 16' 4x4s on my '78 Granada and both minivans. Easy! Pickups make it harder, actually.
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Your Taurus wagon is bigger than my Jeep Cherokee and I've carried my 17 foot canoe on the rack plenty of times. Just get some decent tie-downs (I like the cheap ratchet straps from HF) or rope and take them home. Sometimes if I'm transporting just a few pieces of lumber on the rack, I'll temporarily nail or screw on a piece of 2X4 crossways to provide a positve stop agains the long boards sliding forward or backward.
--
Often wrong, never in doubt.

Larry Wasserman - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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Probably OK, just check what the car and roof rack manufacturer say about maximum weight loading. Maximum roof load for my Toyota Verso is 90kg or about 198lb which is more than I could lift. They also say any load should not exceed the overall vehicle length (172") but that may be down to UK regs.
As others have said, any length projecting beyond the vehicle should probably have some sort of warning beacon/flag or whatever and keep your speed down.
I've had 4.6m (15 foot) floor-boards and 4.2m 9x2's on my Verso and just pottered along the side-roads between the timber merchants and my home.
4x4 shouln't fexx too much but I would strap them thightly together at the ends so that they behave like a 8x4 and tie them narrow edge down.
--
Stuart Winsor

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Ooops! Flex
--
Stuart Winsor

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Been there and done that. Carried many things on the roof of my car, wagon and/or van.
The key to carrying anything on the roof is a good set of roof carriers if the car is not equipped with them. then find an anchor point under the front and back bumpers. Tie the wood front and back down tightly to these anchor points to prevent rocking up and down. Use the same rope to continue tying the wood down to the roof rack to prevent side to side motion. It is important to use continuous rope or tie the ropes together or you risk one or more of the end ropes slipping off or loosening off, keep the ropes tight. Use a good grade of 1/4" nylon rope, it has some stretch so that you can snug it up with tension on it.
I once carried 320 pounds of 20 foot long re-enforcing steel bars on the roof of a car. Had to tie each end down very tightly to prevent them from bouncing up and down. No highway speeds but did move them about 10 miles. Also learned how to carry 5 foot square sheets of baltic birch plywood on the roof of my mini-van. Since if was longer than the roof racks and wider than the vehicle, there was little opportunity to find tie own points. Found out that I could fit a point of a corner of the plywood under the front roof rack cross member and then tie it down to the back cross member with tension on it. It was like driving with wings as the diagonal width was over 6 feet. Since the front edge was down under the cross member there was no uplift from the air movement. Worked great.
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Harry, I think some have given good ideas buy might have missed a important point. The recks on the Taurus were not designed to take a point load in the center of its length. I would spread this load by having a 2x4 cut in half and run it perpendicular to the length of the car. Allowing the 4x4 to sit on the 2x, this will push the load points to the ride rails which should handle this load without problem. I had a Volvo wagon that by adding these boards was ablt to handle in excess of 20-2x6x12's at a time. Tie the load down as others have suggested, keeping the same overhang on the front and back thus splitting the load. Should have no problem moving 4 at a time. SteveA
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SteveA wrote:

What SteveA said--and make sure your insurance is paid up! ; )
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Just an update guys. First off, I greatly appreciate all of the responses I received! I can tell many here have had similar issues and unique solutions.
Someone had asked about Lowe's and, yes, that or HD was where I was originally going to purchase the 4 posts. You were correct about their $75 delivery charge and the truck they rent was too short for the posts, so I decided against either option.
I also decided against the stationwagon idea. A few years ago, I did purchase a 40' aluminum ladder from Lowe's and tied it to the wagon top. Made it the 23 mile distance home ok, but then again that was aluminum and this is pressure treated soil contact 4x4's so a different animal I suspect.
My local lumber yard, who I hardly ever use, to the rescue! Posts are bit higher in price than Lowe's or HD, but only a $3 delivery charge per post. So $12 versus $75 at either of the two chains. I'm going with the local lumber yard.
Thanks again for all the commentary and tips!
Harry

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