Translucent Black staining technique

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I use water based annaline dyes to stain the wood. next I apply several coats of a good poly/tung penetrating sealer followed by multiple coats of a water based sanding sealer. for a hand rubbed finish I use Behlen's Master Gel ( 5 - 8 coats rubbed on & polished off) followed by 3 coats of wax (Butcher's bowling alley wax or a good clear car wax)
I suspect that you never used a penetrating sealer. That step REALLY makes the figure pop!
You can see some examples @ www.spectorbass.com &/or www.spectorguitar.com anything that says 'oil finish' & 'made in USA' was done by yours truely
-- jepp if it sounds good...IT IS GOOD!

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crow wrote:

Beautiful work, Crow.
--
Thad

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&
Nice looking stuff. I had always been told by high end luthiers that they preferred nothing but Nitrocellulose Lacquer for a finish coat. They claim it allows for more tone and a warmer tone. (more flexible than a poly finish). Your thoughts on this - since I see you use poly finishes?
--

-Mike-
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http://www.warmoth.com/paint/paint.cfm?fuseaction=dye_black
Warmoth Dye Black
Warmoth Guitar Products, Inc. 6424 112th Street East Puyallup, Washington 98373-4313 USA (253)845-0403 or snipped-for-privacy@warmoth.com

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http://www.warmoth.com/paint/paint.cfm?fuseaction=dye_black
Warmoth Dye Black
Warmoth Guitar Products, Inc. 6424 112th Street East Puyallup, Washington 98373-4313 USA (253)845-0403 or snipped-for-privacy@warmoth.com

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I bought a DVD from stewmac on guitar refinishing. On of the techniques for Highly figured wood he stains with black shoe polish. then he sands it down leaving just enough black to highlight the grain then he dyes it. It just looks unbelievable. He said he found shoe polish works the best and the wood has to be very highly figured.
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Stephen Jones wrote:

Years ago I found out how the Mexicans achieved the black stain used on some of their furniture. Go out to the road with a hammer and old screwdriver. Chip up some asphalt or tar from the road and put it in a can. Pour some leaded regular gas into the can and let the tar dissolve. Unleaded and Hi test gas are OK, too. You then use a rag and apply the blackened gas to your wood, like stain, but rub it in. Repeat until you get the desired stain. My uncle figured this out because he knew Mexicans couldn't afford to buy stain, and the roads in Mexico are generally pretty bad.
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Are you sure it was Mexico and not the state of Pennsylvania?
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"Mike Marlow" wrote...

Hah! Over my way Penndot has the state highway all tore up, and our New Yorker immigrants have knocked out half the little one-lane stone bridges over the local creeks: it's getting hard to get anywhere around here. Took 'em years, and the exit of the idiot former head of Penndot, just to replace the Dark Hollow bridge.
Asphaltum is available in one gallon cans from Hood Finishing. I really like it over aniline dye. For example, Moser's Bright Golden Orange dye looks pretty silly when you first apply it, but let it dry and then apply thinned asphaltum, and it takes on a deep rich reddish brown hue, looking very vintage, but with incredible depth; definately not bright orange anymore!
Asphaltum can be thinned with paint thinner or naphtha. It looks like black tar in the can, but thins to a rich warm brown.
ALso, the guitar in the pic does not have any asphaltum in the finish. It is definately black aniline dye. Aniline dye really pops the grain on curly maple like that, and is available in a wide range of bright colors, as well as traditional wood tones. I've had good results using Mosers water-based aniline dye from Woodworker's Supply.
Basically, the darkness of tone is achieved by the strength of the mixture - add more dye powder to the mix for darker, less for lighter. Wash the wood with a wet cloth and let dry, then final sand, to raise the grain and sand it flush again before applying the dye. Flood the wood with the dye, then wipe off the excess. You want the dye to soak into the wood, as opposed to sitting on the surface of the wood like stain.
--
Timothy Juvenal
www.tjwoodworking.com
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Stephen Jones wrote:

As others have noted, stains on maple don't take well (aren't usually attractive). When I've tried it, the results were blotchy and hard to control. Dyes were suggested, and I've heard one other recommendation, from a luthier- nitric acid. It has an interesting look, but ask a chemist about precautions.
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On Thu, 14 Dec 2006 23:28:06 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@sdf.lNoOnSePsAtMar.org (Stephen Jones) wrote:

Probably not a stain, but a dye or ink instead. My guess would be that it is not "translucent" at all, but a solid black. The grain in the wood shows through because the chatoyance in the curly maple reflects light in different directions.
That's my guess, anyhow- based on ebonizing more subdued woods, where the grain lines remain visible, but the effect is much less dramatic.
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