Toe kick (and other) advice needed

I'm actually not real new to woodworking - been at it for a while, but my attention recently seems to have turned to kitchen/bath cabinetry. I have read through a couple of books and John Paquay's paper as well.
Let me see if I can describe what I'm thinking.
I just finished 3 vanities. My methodology was to cut a 3/8 groove for the floor of the cabinet. Then, during assembly, I simply measured between the sides with the floor in, to get exact dimensions for stretchers front/back, and toe kick/floor support front/rear, and the rails for installation. My kicks are inside the sides, then I finish with matching 1/4 ply after install.
It occurred to me that cutting these additional pieces by measuring - well, there has to be a better way. If I've got the setup on the saw anyway, for the groove for the floor, why not go ahead and cut the same across the top (actually seen this before). Then I can cut my front/rear stretchers at the same time as the floor, and I KNOW they are right on. That part makes sense.
But how can I use this same concept to do the kick (and rear floor support) ? If I had the same groove there, once again I could cut same time as the floor and be right on. I don't see a way really. Same with the rails in the back - that then presents a challenge for installing the back.
Am I just running into the same challenges all cabinet builders have been through ? How do you guys that have been doing this for a long time or in production do it ?
Thanks
jim
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I'm finding it hard to visualize your problem. Can you boil the question down to one or two sentences? There are many, many different way to build cabinets or to organize your assembly line. No one way will be best except the way that works for you with whatever you decide the criteria is. Good luck to you and be safe!
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"Jim Bailey" wrote in message

Are you doing traditional face frame or Euro style cabs?
If face frame, go back and re-read John Paquay's booklet ... IMO, and although his is based on "production" techniques, he deals with the issue in a very traditional and time honored way, one which guarantees the strongest possible cabinet, upper or lower.
I learned a very similar method to John's when working for an old time cabinet maker in England some 40 years ago and have made literally hundreds of cabinets this way since.
It there's a better way to make a traditional kitchen/bath cabinet, either a production run or one-off, that is both strong and SQUARE, I've yet to see it.
And "square" is the name of the game when time is money.
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"Swingman" wrote

Sorry Swingman, I must of missed this discussion. What is the John Paquay booklet and where can I get a copy?
Thanks.
And just why do you think this is a good approach?
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"Lee Michaels" wrote in message

http://home.insightbb.com/~jpaquay/byokc.html
I use it because, along with the fact that I take a good deal of pride in my finished work, the quicker I can get to the finished product without sacrificing quality, the better ... aka, time is money. :)
This method allows me to quickly and efficiently _batch cut_ the parts, insuring uniformity across many boxes, and the assemble "strong and square" cabinets from the batch cut parts.
With the traditional face frame style, by paying particular attention to carefully building properly squared face frames _first_, then using the face frame as the base to assemble the cabinets on, you are guaranteed a strong, square cabinet box.
"Strength" is its on justification ... "Square" can only really be appreciated by those who have to install multiple cabinets, all with cabinet doors and drawers, quickly, easily and efficiently.
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