Tips for spray lacquer

A tight delivery schedule for my daughter's jewelry armoire has led me to b uy a couple of cans of semi-gloss spray lacquer because of the 30-minute re coat time. I'm thinking three coats should suffice, but having never used this before I'm looking for any tips from those of you who have.
Thanks,
Larry
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A tight delivery schedule for my daughter's jewelry armoire has led me to buy a couple of cans of semi-gloss spray lacquer because of the 30-minute recoat time. I'm thinking three coats should suffice, but having never used this before I'm looking for any tips from those of you who have.
Lacquer thins out a lot after it is dry, three coats might be a bit on the skimpy side depending upon how thick you spray it.
I don't have spray equipment but I brush a lot of Deft...always three heavy coats minimum, then sand lightly and 1-2 more.
dadiOH
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A tight delivery schedule for my daughter's jewelry armoire has led me to buy a couple of cans of semi-gloss spray lacquer because of the 30-minute recoat time. I'm thinking three coats should suffice, but having never used this before I'm looking for any tips from those of you who have.
Thanks,
Larry *******************************
Some good info here: http://www.woodcentral.com/russ/finish11.shtml
Art
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On Monday, June 10, 2013 4:04:59 PM UTC-5, Gramp's shop wrote:

I've never used the spray cans, but spray lacquer with a gun. Don't spray i n direct sunlight, or your finish coats will wrinkle/alligator.
If you have overspray, lightly sand it before spraying the next coat. Over spray is the spraying over an area you've just sprayed, i.e., overlapping s weeps of your sprayings, and a whitish cobweb-like surface will develope on top of the previous sweep. I often get overspray in cabinet corners. All ow those areas to dry before lightly sanding. I wouldn't think you would h ave too much overspray with a small jewelry box, but it's something to watc h for or recognize.
Try to avoid spraying too thick, so as not to have runs. For something tha t small, spray each face with the face flat, facing up, so that any excess lacquer won't run, it'll level out.... unless you know for sure the lacquer is not too thick/so thick, as to run.
Don't spray under a tree on windy days or you'll get tree debris on your pr oject. *I spray outdoors under shady trees, most often.
Sonny
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If it does, respray and put the sprayed object inside a closed container such as a cardboard box. That slows the drying of the lacquer allowing the water vapor to escape. You could spray with just lacquer thinner too.
dadiOH
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wrote:

recoat time.  I'm thinking three coats should suffice, but having never u sed this before I'm looking for any tips from those of you who have.

I use that stuff in emergency, and it works great if you know what you are doing. Full, wet coats on each surface with good lap joints per pass is the key to success, as well as controlling the overspray on smaller projects. To apply coats of lacquer, the instructions are your best guideline, but you will need to adjust as per the number of coats you apply, which of course will depend on the desired appearance of the final product.
If you are in moderate climate with the temps under 80 degrees F and moderate humidity (less than 75%) then the following might be good guidelines.
Apply the first coat, then let it dry for 30 minutes. Apply a second coat. Let it dry for about an hour, hour and a half. The best way to tell if it is ready for a third coat is to lightly press your thumb onto the surface (where it can't be seen!) and see if you feel any adhesion. If you do, wait another half hour. The coated surface will be ready for another pass when you don't feel adhesion, but you can barely see your thumbprint in the finish when you move your finger.
If you need 4 coats, use the same technique to determine when the surface is ready, but wait about 2 hours before applying another coat to allow the preceding coats to outgas uniformly and sufficiently as to not foul the remaining coats.
Buy the best spray lacquer you can, and buy cans with a fan tip, NOT round. The fan tips make things much easier to successfully apply controlled coats. Personally, I would suggest DEFT rattle cans. Really good stuff.
Buy a couple more cans than you think you will need and hold onto the receipts. Using rattle cans will require a lot more expense and a lot more material as the cans only get about 35% of the lacquer on the project in most cases. Take back what you don't use. Remember to get some lacquer thinner for any cleanup of overspray, or if this will be your only foray into lacquer application for a while, Goof Off works well too, and can be used for a lot of other things.
Good luck!
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On Jun 10, 9:06 pm, "Mike Marlow"

*cluck* *cluck* ;^)
Well, one thing Mike is that you need to remember that the OP <<specified>> rattle cans. With those, you cannot control the amount of material coming from the tip, the pressure pushing it, the spray pattern, nor the viscosity or the material you are shooting.
Remember, this is all about rattle cans, not anything else. I wanted to answer the question the way it was asked.
Like you, I don't do what I said when using my equipment. When I was doing a lot of door exterior door refinishing and shooting the catalyzed conversion lacquer I like, I thinned that stuff down about 30% (as much as 50!) and would shoot thin wet coats about every 20 minutes or so. I used my HVLP CAS gun with a 1.2mm cap at about 16 - 19 psi and away I went!
I could put on 8 coats during the day (2mm per pass at point of application) and hang the door and lock it out before going home.
Sanding is for mistakes. Good shooting technique requires no sanding.
Worried about blush? Put on the thinnest wet coat you can (with the aforementioned overlaps of 50%) and check out to see if it blushes. This trick is worth the price of admission... if you get some blushing, spray a wet coat of pure thinner on the surface and it will go away!
Shellac under lacquer on a pushed schedule? Never. Shellac used alcohol as a solvent/carrier, and lacquer used lacquer thinner which is much hotter (significantly higher VOC). This makes it too easy to trap the slower evaporating alcohol under a much quicker drying solvent based coating which can lead to too many problems to count. Effectively, unless the shellac is properly cured, you can trap the alcohol underneath the lacquer since they are two dissimilar solvents (one is miscible, and one is not).
Unless you are sealing a damaged, dirty, or contaminated surface, there is no need for shellac under lacquer. Lacquer resolvates onto itself, and makes the perfect primer for the subsequent build coats.
*cluck* *cluck* my butt !!
But giving credit where credit is due, I still remember it was you that got me to first try shooting urethane. I think about how encouraging you were when I would have nothing to do with shooting that stuff just about every time I load it up. I remember how silly I felt after I shot it out on some cardboard and it worked just fine. It is more viscous and dries slower than my really hot finishes so it took a bit to get the hang of it, but after a quart or so I was all over it.
As a sidebar, if you are shooting metal doors or other things (I know you do cars, but if anything else gets in front of your gun) Sherwin Williams is coming out with a new super hot 20 minute dry, high build enamel. It might already be out. I loved their old product and it performed like iron on handrails, metal doors (think behind strip centers), and shot on like glass with minimum fuss with all the usual equipment. Tried it in my HVLP and it worked great, but out of my CAS guns it was terrific. Thinned it with toluene and it dried in 15 minutes! My SW guy says this stuff is even better. He said it was made for wood (with a lot of prep) but was great for metal over primer.
Want me to get you some info when it comes in?
Robert
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couple of cans of semi-gloss spray lacquer because of the 30-minute recoat time. I'm thinking three coats should suffice, but having never used this before I'm looking for any tips from those of you who have.

I'm surprised no one has mentioned it yet, but in addition to the other great tips here, get one can only for practice.
First, paint a piece of plywood or brown construction paper to get a feel for how the product flows and covers. In particular, note how fast your move to get full wet coats without running.
Then use some wood like you used in the project, sanded to the same state, and repeat the practice spraying, using multiple coats like you will on the final, and noting the drying time.
Only when you have mastered the test pieces is it safe to move on to your jewelry box.
$5 of practice paint is a good investment.
--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

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In belched:

A can of sanding sealer would help a lot. I use a heavy bodied sealer from Mohawk. Instead of sanding between coats, I would just use extra fine steel wool. It cuts less and will rub out any overspray and is more forgiving than sand paper. Also, if you have it available , wiping it down after steel wool with a tack rag will give you excellent results. Also, a few practice sprays will help give you the feel of it. IMO, lacquer is one of the easiest finishes to apply and is quick and forgiving. Just use several light coats rather than heavy coats hth
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On 6/10/2013 4:04 PM, Gramp's shop wrote:

a couple of cans of semi-gloss spray lacquer because of the 30-minute recoat time. I'm thinking three coats should suffice, but having never used this before I'm looking for any tips from those of you who have.

If it's not too big,
A cardboard box makes a serviceable spray booth. I prefer a "door" on the side.
A block of wood for the subject to sit on (or a lazy susan?) and keep if off the bottom of the box.
Light spray of lacquer inside the box to tack down any dust,
Spray and close the door.
Come back 30 minutes later.
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On Mon, 10 Jun 2013 14:04:59 -0700 (PDT), "Gramp's shop"

couple of cans of semi-gloss spray lacquer because of the 30-minute recoat time. I'm thinking three coats should suffice, but having never used this before I'm looking for any tips from those of you who have.

Clean it well Nailshooters will probably be along with good advice, rattle can can give great results.
Mark
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On Monday, June 10, 2013 2:04:59 PM UTC-7, Gramp's shop wrote:

recoat time. I'm thinking three coats should suffice, but having never use d this before I'm looking for any tips from those of you who have.

hen immediately while it is still wet lay a second coat front to back. Of c ourse if you have a lazy susan or whatever, just two coats at once in diffe rent directions.
This fills all crevices but also adds a little more volume to wet out the s urface and have it flow flat. after a few light coats let it dry a few hour s, then light sand with worn out 400, 600 or even 800. Then one more coat.
In the real world that last coat would be thinned quite a bit. I have even just sprayed a coat of solvent to rewet and level the surface.
You might consider a cricket (I think that is what they are called.) it is a little glass bottle with an air spray can attachment. then you can mix re al lacquer to your own liking on a mini scale.

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"SonomaProducts.com" wrote:

-------------------------------------------------------- I know them as being produced by PreVal.
Available in any automotive paint store.
Lew
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On 6/10/2013 5:04 PM, Gramp's shop wrote:

a couple of cans of semi-gloss spray lacquer because of the 30-minute recoat time. I'm thinking three coats should suffice, but having never used this before I'm looking for any tips from those of you who have.

Lacquer and shellac very fast. Shellac is way too under utilized. You can keep laying coats of lacquer since each coat melts the previous. In the end it will take a few days to fully harden. If you can leave it for 1 week before sanding out and steel wooling, you will be much better.
BTW always in the future get gloss, when you finish sand and steel wool you can get any level of sheen you want, all the way up to full gloss again.
--
Jeff

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e recoat time.  I'm thinking three coats should suffice, but having never used this before I'm looking for any tips from those of you who have.

Shellac is the perfect sealer for under lacquer. Lazy Susan is a big help for spraying small, jewelry box-sized pieces. Four coats of lacquer are better than three, help protect against burning through if you rub the finish.
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On Monday, June 10, 2013 4:04:59 PM UTC-5, Gramp's shop wrote:

recoat time. I'm thinking three coats should suffice, but having never use d this before I'm looking for any tips from those of you who have.

Thank you, one and all. I have cold beer in the fridge if any of you spray ers are in the neighborhood :-)
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I read all of the replies to your post, and most were really good. I noticed that there were two critical points not mentioned. *First, if you shoot with a gun, mix some lacquer retarder in your final coats to make it flow out. This will also remove blushes and some roughness. A thin quick spraying of Sanding sealer over a newly finished last coat can slick things out sometimes. *Second, you must position your view of your spraying so that you can see that you are covering, looking for a reflection.
Others have made some excellent points, I largely agree with most. Lacquer sanding sealer is most of what I use on all but the finish coat. Sanding sealer is easy to sand and it makes it easier to achieve that slick finish. Lacquer is too hard to sand to make a really smooth substrate, and the sanding sealer coats make the finish look deeper.
In general, if you thin more, it will take more coats. I usually do between 3 and 5 coats.
I spray with a Binks model 7 cup gun that has worked well, but a cheap gun can achieve as much. If you shoot clear products with a gun, do not use this gun for any color because sometimes a residue of color will show up on your nice clear finish. Better to just go get a cheapo Harbor Freight gun and dedicate it to color. I am sure that someone will disagree with me about this, but it's my opinion and the way I work.
woodstuff
A tight delivery schedule for my daughter's jewelry armoire has led me to buy a couple of cans of semi-gloss spray lacquer because of the 30-minute recoat time. I'm thinking three coats should suffice, but having never used this before I'm looking for any tips from those of you who have.
Thanks,
Larry
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OOPS! Error
Wrong: A thin quick spraying of Sanding sealer over a newly finished last coat can slick things out sometimes.
Correction: Spray Lacquer Retarder to smooth it out, not the other.
Sorry folks, I'm just tired.
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Sorry,Use Lacquer Retarder to smooth out a freshly sprayed finish coat.
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cabinets that I build. The only reason that I finish some things is because there are too many painters who don't pay attention to detail and consequently make my work look bad. (I have by now done so many cabinets that I have learned most of what *not* to do)! I wanted an HVLP rig long ago, as I wanted a good airless, but the money just didn't happen when I was young so I just stayed with what I had.
Today, I am struggling to just maintain my equipment and tooling; there isn't an excess of money right now; there are no new guns in my plans. If I had to pay rent for my shop in an industrial district like in the past, this business would be history. Even though there is more prosperity here in north Texas than what I have heard of in other places, I still don't see many new houses going up. Sometimes I feel like I should have aspired to be a Wal-Mart door greeter.
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