Three Phase Pugmill

Hi! I'm a potter who acquired a used deairing pugmill designed for three phase power, which I don't have and don't plan to get. Can a static converter succesfully run it on 220? Or should I switch out the motor to run on ordinary house current? If needed, I can post HP, model, etc. of the machine. It has two motors, one to turn the two screws to mix the clay, and one to run the vacuam. Thanks! Sparfish Studio
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On Aug 1, 8:16?pm, snipped-for-privacy@msn.com (C. A. Sanger) wrote:

Sparfish
And a 3 phase converter should do well for you if it is necessary.
Bob AZ
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Static phase converters aren't designed to handle multiple motors very well. A rotary phase converter will be better suited for the job, but can be quite expensive. Probably the first thing that you should do is to price replacement motors and then decide whether new motors or a rotary phase converter is the best option. Of course, if you go with a phase converter, then you will be able to acquire additional 3 phase equipment and run one of them at a time.
Charley

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At the Vegas AWFS show I had a long conversation with a guy who was selling rotatry converters. I mentioned "running" one at a time and he assured me it was just "starting" one at a time that was the limitation. He said the converter can feed multile machines at the same time but the start-up draw requirements only allow one to start at a time.
I've seen from Craigs list and other places that you can often get great prices on older 3 phase equipment because the "demand" side of the equation is minimal with not so many people that have 3 phase so the prices are low. This is especially true for much older machines because most established companies (ie those with 3 phase in their factory) aren't interested in buying old equipment. So a converter could be a great investment over time.

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On Wed, 1 Aug 2007 20:16:17 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@msn.com (C. A. Sanger) wrote:

What's the power? Can you supply that power with your single pahse supply?
If you can't, then no converter is going to add power, so you're looking at a new supply. Might as well be three phase.
If it is, and you are going to buy a 3 phase motor to build a rotary converter, then why not get a single phase motor and fit that to the machine? If it's a simple fitment, a standard motor mount, a simple on/off control system and moderate power, then this is often the simplest and cheapest overall system.
Rotary converters are great for running a workshop. One they're built and installed, you're sorted for any number of motors in a whole workshop, in any combination (subject just to the overall power rating). It's also a good DIY route if you can obtain second-hand large 3 phase motors cheaply.
Static convertersare OK for single motors, but they're finickey to adjust for load. They're OK for a one-off motor and a constant load, but they're awkward to set up, especially for varying loads and they're pretty much unworkable to run a whole workshop, They're also less efficient, which might limit the available output power from a fixed supply rating.
Electronic inverters are great, but still expensive, especially for high powers. They're worth it for variable speeds, soft starts etc., but if all you need is brute force, then they're too expensive.
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