Test your gluing knoweldge.

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My score wasn't great..20 out of 28.. I thought I would breeze through that one..
http://www.woodweb.com/knowledge_base/Test_your_gluing_knowledge.html
Informative
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I missed 3. Can I take it again?
Dave
Robatoy wrote:

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24 of 28, according to them, although I disagree with their answers on 16 & 18.
Patriarch
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23 of 28 - and I agree with you about 16 and 18.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote in

Heh. I'd be tempted to say the more questions you got right, the less you actually know about glue :-)
That's got to be the most absurdly poor test I've ever seen.
Take question 20 - heating the glue line will not speed the cure. That's false - gently heating an epoxy glue line will definately speed the cure (it is, in fact, recommended practice if the air temp is much below 60F).
Or take 28 - glues last forever, there's no shelf life. Again, that's true for epoxy (per West System) and probably true for dry hide glue.
John
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LOL
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On Tue, 14 Jun 2005 23:23:48 -0500, Patriarch

me too. I use air dried lumber all the time.
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wrote:

What a stupid test. Only five true answers out of 28 questions. Test Taking 101 made it easy as the questions were mostly poorly worded for an actual test.
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LRod

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Test Taking 101: Any t/f question stated as an absolute is false. This applied in about 1/2 the questions. And it's a poorly designed website as I could see the answer to the next question while viewing the current questions answer without even scrolling down. Guess the designer wasn't working on a large monitor..... jc
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On Wed, 15 Jun 2005 05:38:10 +0100, the opaque LRod

And disinformative, with an obvious bias against air-dried lumber.

I had to guess the answer to just 1 question (formaldehyde) but scored only 22. I totally disagreed with 5 of their answers. Who wrote that test, Vila? (Or some guy in a humidified shop with KD lumber, eh?)
Biscuits/dowels WILL increase edge-gluing strength.
Gluing PROPERLY air-dried lumber is fine. (I answered that one correctly but disagreed with the text of the question there.)
MANY, MANY shops don't need to be humidified in winter.
Glue performance CAN be easily (failure) tested in the shop, but you won't have the actual data gathered by a test facility.
Etc, etc.
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On Wed, 15 Jun 2005 07:36:12 -0700, Larry Jaques
Well there's a novelty...

Multi-choice tests are a major factor in dumbing down _everything_, and the software industry in particular.
You can't educate someone, then test this with a multi-choice test. All you can do is train them to spot test answers, which is a much easier and less useful achievement. The multi-choice approach tests _nothing_ in terms of any real understanding, or any ability to react in a useful manenr to an unexpected situation.
However the testing is cheap, and it encourages 3rd party testing. It's a great little business to offer, it's just not useful as an educational tool.

Mine usually needs to be pumped out.
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Andy Dingley wrote:

....
...
The point is to pass the flunkies on their mandatory safety training so they can clock in--whether they actually know anything about safe workplace practices is purely a secondary consideration at best at that point...
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I got 25 out of 28. A number of the questions were misleading or poorly worded.

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WOODWEB DISCLAIMS any and all RESPONSIBILITY and LIABILITY for the accuracy and application of the information below.
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Precisely. In particular glue starvation when clamping too tight.
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This "quiz" seems to be a marketing thing from an adhesives seller.
There were, as some other folks have mentioned, some questions that were very poorly worded.
"All glues are the same; they all work on wood" -- that's two unrelated statements. And yes, all glues *do* work on wood, just some work very poorly.
"Yellow glue is strong-White glue is only used by schoolchildren" -- another pair of not-really-connected statements.
"There is no glue like the old hide glue" -- well, that's true. They said it's false because there ara other glues that hold stronger.
"Aliphatic glue is superior" -- to what?
"Water based glues are harmful because they will swell and twist wood" -- well, that depends on how much you use, what kind of wood, etc. The answer uses weasel words: "most", "if".
"Thick glue is better and fills gaps and voids" -- two more unrelated statements. Better for *what*?
After finding problems in 6 of the first 10 questions, I gave up.
Dave O'Heare, technical writer and pedant oheareATmagmaDOTca
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Dave O'Heare wrote:

If you're a writer working for such a company, the marketing department, even if you're part of it, will do its level best to pretend you don't exist. But you WILL be blamed for the screw-ups. Been there. Done that.
I got through four or five questions and went elsewhere to read. It seems impossible to teach companies that this kind of marketing effort does more harm than good. It is astonishing when you realize that less than an hour would have had to been added to the writer's workload to make the test useful and fun.
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Charlie Self wrote: ...

But, as usual, they were more interested in promoting their agenda...
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Oddly, glue manufacturers in general do no subscribe to the "Glue Starvation" Theory. Most indicate that you cannot clamp tight enough that you would actually squeeze all the glue out of the joint. MHO "Glue Starvation" is simply not having enough glue to cover the entire surface to start with.

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Yup, that's pretty much the story I got from the Franklin techs. Their take on the "too much pressure" theory is that if you clamp so tightly that you damage the wood fibers at the joint, a bond failure is really a wood failure. Crushed wood will give way under load; not the chemical bond of the glue to the wood.
Since I don't use a hydraulic press to clamp boards I doubt I've crushed any wood to the point of joint failure.
Dave
Leon wrote:

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