Tenon rounding

Short of buying a $3 zillion CNC milling machine, is there a jig or some other mechanized way to round the sides of a tenon to make it a good fit in a routed mortice or am I hooked into squaring off the mortise?
I have both a horizontal and a vertical router table available as well as "the usual suspects" in a decently equipped shop.
Bill
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Why worry about it? You're not "hooked" into anything. Use a hand saw and a utility knife, chisel or shoulder plane to knock the corners off of your tenons. It doesn't have to be a perfect fit. You'll never see it, and neither will your customers. Tom Bill wrote:

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On Sat, 11 Nov 2006 02:39:33 -0800, tom wrote:

If I trim too much off the rounded parts, won't the joint be weak?
For a stopped tenon, obviously, appearance doesn't matter, but for a through tenon, appearance would be half the battle. In either case, I want the joint to be strong enough to outlast me.
I am enough older than my wife that I am planning cabinets that will, by design, outlast me by a wide margin.
Bill
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Not really - since the ends of the tenons would be gluing to end grain (inside the mortise), which is very weak in comparison. The long-grain to long-grain glue surfaces on the longer cheeks of the tenon are where they get almost all their strength. Of course, for through tenons, it would have to be much tighter - I've avoided those so far. If I made them, I'd probably square off the mortises instead, as I think that would look better for most furniture styles (or stiles...). I'd also think about tapering the mortise very slightly, so the outer (visible) side presses tighter against the tenon. Oh, and for rounding off tenons, I usually use a fine hand saw to cut into the tenon corners flush with the shoulder, and then a chisel to split off the corners. Then pare down the remaining corners a little more until they fit. Good luck, Andy
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Ahhh, a through tenon is a different animal. Never mind! The through tenons I've made I took my time on (actually, I'm slow at just about everything), using a morticing machine and then a block plane to bevel and fit the showy portion of the tenon. Tom Bill wrote:

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With through tenons, I'll usually square up the routed mortise by hand. I've never liked the look of rounded-end through tenons, as much as I use them when they're hidden.
At one time or another, I've used most of the methods previously mentioned, rasps, chisels, even sanding blocks to knock the corners off the tenons. I care about the fit on the sides and ends of the tenon, and don't spend many seconds on the radius.
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Simple solution. Route mortices in both parts and make loose tennons. Rounded tennons for, say a 1/2" mortice, are made by cutting tennon stock to 1/2" thick to whatever width needed then rounding over the edges with a 1/4" roundover bit. --dave

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On Sat, 11 Nov 2006 11:17:19 +0000, Dave Jackson wrote:

I am hoping for in through tenons.
Bill
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Rasp. Takes about 30 seconds.

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A good woodworker's rasp ($40 variety) is a remarkable tool. The cheapies at the BORG are not so good. Try Lee Valley.
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Try FWW #172. Jeff Miller has a method that is so foolproof, you can use it for through tenons.
Here's a link to online, but you need an online subscription to view the whole thing (or the paper copy) http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/SkillsAndTechniques/SkillsAndTechniquesPDF.aspx?id )38 jc

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On Sat, 11 Nov 2006 13:47:33 +0000, Joe wrote:

http://www.taunton.com/finewoodworking/SkillsAndTechniques/SkillsAndTechniquesPDF.aspx?id )38
Thanks ... and the web site let me see the article without kicking!
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Get a strip of 36 or 40 grit sandpaper, a belt sander belt works fine, and do a "shoe-shine" on the tenon end that needs to be rounded.
Oops, I guess that doesn't count, it's not "mechanized" :)
--
Contentment makes poor men rich. Discontent makes rich men poor.
--Benjamin Franklin
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On Sat, 11 Nov 2006 07:11:44 +0000, Bill wrote:
(yadda yadda)
Just posting to thank the group for giving me fresh perspective. Sometimes I get so focused on a problem that I kick the solution to the side so I can concentrate!
Here I was trying to figure out how I was going to get a router to (safely) round off the corners and the answer is to turn the router off and take a few swipes with just about any other tool ... rasps, sanders, handsaws, chisels.
The matter of rounded v squared tenon would seem to be an aesthetic judgement call. If I make the tenon a wedged tenon a little slop in the rounding process might actually work to my favor. Indeed, if I were to slit the tenon and drill an undersized hole, the wedging could be done with a dowel.
There seems to be some design potential here.
Thanks, guys. I think I'll go downstairs and play for a while.
Bill
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