Table saw that fits through a 33" door?

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We're beginning to finish the basement, including an 11' x 22' shop. The shop has an existing door; the door being a standard 3' door, it has 33" of clear width when open. With this being a mild climate (northern California), I'll do quite a bit of woodworking outdoors for over half the year; the area right outside the basement is a flat patio with concrete floor, in the shade of trees. 220V power is available both indoors and outdoors. All the larger machinery (like a tablesaw) has to be on a mobile base, to be moved around within the shop (to make room for larger projects), and to be moved outside.
Because of the space constraint, I'm restricting myself to saws with 30" fences and without outfeed tables. Cutting of large plywood pieces isn't done on the tablesaw; instead, it has to be done outdoors with a circular saw along a straightedge guide. That's life for people that have a small shop.
I would love to buy a really great tablesaw for the new shop (for example a General 350/650), but there are a few problems. First, a saw that's physically that big uses way too much room when not in use. Second, it would not fit through the door, and I want a saw that can be moved in and out of the shop. Third, a saw that heavy is probably nearly impossible to move over the 3/4" high door threshold, even on a mobile base.
So here's the question: What's the "best" tablesaw that can be moved through a 33" wide door, without having to disassemble it to much? Clearly, any benchtop saw (a good example is the Bosch 4000, or the Ryobi BT3xxx) would fit fine; but they are just too small, often have non-standard size miter slots, and don't have decent fences (not to speak of undersized motors and so many other restrictions). I want a saw that is accurate enough for furniture woodworking, can take a reasonable size dado set, and is handles standard accessories.
Right now, I'm leaning towards either der DeWalt 746, or the Jet Supersaw. I just measured the size of a Supersaw in the store: To fit through the door, I'd have to remove the big bolt in the back that holds the splitter / blade guard; but that hopefully takes only a few minutes to reassemble and align. I've not had the opportunity to measure whether the DW746 would fit through the door.
I've heard a few bad things about the fence on the Jet Supersaw, but the fence on the DW746 doesn't seem to be too sturdy either. Rumor has it that the sliding table attachment on the Jet is nearly worthless, while the one for the DW746 is quite nice. On the other hand, the Jet it is considerably cheaper than the DW746 (in particular once you equip the DeWalt with cast-iron wings). I guess that I could retrofit a high-quality fence onto either saw (as long as it is removable for going through the door).
Could an owner of the DW746 maybe measure whether it will fit through a 33" wide door? How much needs to be disassembled? I'll try to get to a store which has a display model, but that will take me a few weeks until a get around to it, and requires a multi-hour detour.
Does anyone know of other types of saws that could fit the bill? I think all the full-size cabinet and contractors saws are too big. Any other ideas?
And if you want to suggest enlarging the door: Sorry, I thought of that. A 3'6" door (clear opening 39") could theoretically be installed, but it would require cutting through a concrete wall that is 12" thick at the bottom; this is unfortunately not practical. Any larger door would be impossible (due to reasons of building stability), nor really useful: With a shop that's only 11' wide, a 6 foot double door is silly.
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Hi there,
I will go out to the shop and measure my DW746 tomorrow and let you know. I am pretty sure it will fit cause I believe it came in thru a 33" door.
I upgraded my DW746 with the sliding table and one cast iron wing. Both are great additions. I had to fusted with mine for a while to get it set up right. The front fence rail had a slight twist to it but they replaced it right away for me.
Chef
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My Delta Unisaw went through a 30" doorway to go down my basement stairs. I removed the top and borrowed a dial indicator to reinstall it. Once the saw was on the floor of my basement I assembled the mobile base and placed the cabinet inside of it. Then I installed the cast iron top and wings, side table and 52" fence. Since my table saw purchase I also carried down the stairs a Delta 14" closed base bandsaw, Jet 6" closed base jointer and a Delta 10" radial arm saw, just to name the large items. Buying a large table saw shouldn't be a problem, just ask for help while getting it down the stairs.
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On Wed, 21 Jan 2004 07:16:03 -0000, _firstname_@lr_dot_los-gatos_dot_ca.us wrote:

My Wadkin cabinet saw will go through a narrow gap, and you can move it single-handed. The cast iron top comes off and goes into three pieces.
My "plastic bucket" saw (you've all seen the clones) is light enough that I just pick it up and turn it sideways.
Moving the _jointer_ though - now you're talking problems.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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I think the biggest problem you will have is the 3/4" threshold. The mobile bases I've seen tend to have less than 3" wheels, and 3/4" is a lot for them to go over. The one I have doesn't have but 3/4" of clearance to the frame in the raised position anyway. You might want to consider making a base with larger wheels - it will roll easier, and handle the threshold better.
An expensive alternative would be to get two saws: a nice solid cab. saw for inside, and a smaller benchtop saw for outside. Being able to leave one set up for dados would be handy on some projects, and you wouldn't need to haul as many tools in and out.
I don't think my delta contractor saw is any wider than 33" if you take the wings off, and if you take the motor off (not as hard as you think, basically unplug, lift and pull) I doubt it's 33" front to back, which is the way the Delta base rolls anyway. But, it's probably close, and close probably means a battered door frame over time.
Shop Notes had a cool looking table saw/router station on their cover in the last year, that used a DeWalt saw, that looked pretty nice. If you can live without the power of a larger saw it might be the ticket.
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I hope you mean moving it outside for the season and leaving it there, or something like that. Moving anything but a benchtop can be a real bitch, except over a nice flat floor of course.
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Yeah, when I move mine I am always amazed when it stops dead, and it turns out to be some 1/8" thick cutoff.

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Any possibliity to changing the door? How about putting in a nice set of double doors and then you could move any saw. For the 3/4 threshold, that will be touch with a moble base. Maybe a small ramp to get from the floor height to the threshold height?
Bernie
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Typical 10in cabinet saws are less than 30inches deep, even with the fence attached,so size wise it should go thru a 33in door fine with a little care
I cannot imagine any contractor saw that would not be able to get thru a 33inch door
John
On Wed, 21 Jan 2004 07:16:03 -0000, _firstname_@lr_dot_los-gatos_dot_ca.us wrote:

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Me and a friend were able to get a Unisaw down into my basement. It came up about 8 steps to the back porch, in through the door (another step up), through a 30" interior door, and down a full flight of stairs, including sharp 90 degree turns at the top and bottom. We did a lot of planning and worrying, but in the end it turned out to be a piece of cake.
We took the cast iron top and adjusting wheels off and put it on a hand truck (with a piece of 3/4 plywood to extend the truck's shelf to be as wide as the saw cabinet). Getting the top off and back on is not hard (it's just 4 big allen-head bolts from below), but you've got to re-align it when you're done, which is a a little tricky. Taking the top off not only reduces the footprint, it removes a lot of weight, and just as importantly, moves the center of gravity way lower.
Between getting the top back on, assembling the wings, the mobile base, the extension table, the fence, putting in the 220V circuit, etc, the two of us had a full afternoon's work after the basic moving, plus I put in a few more evenings by myself before I even got to turn the thing on the first time.
The one really big surprise of the whole deal was discovering that the fence rail (I got the Unifence, don't know how this works with the Beis) slides in from the end. This means you transiently need an open space which is twice as long as the rail, or about 15 feet total. In my cramped basement shop, that was a problem. I ended up turning the machine on a diagonal to find the room.
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Bessy fence just bolts on to the rail, that just bolts onto the tablesaw
John

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You would think so, but I had to remove the molding to get my Craftsman in, and even then it was very tight.
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I own a Supersaw. It takes 2-3 minutes to remove/replace that splitter. Once aligned, I've never had to re-align. I just pop it on/off as necessary.

I've said a few unkind things about the Supersaw, but the fence has been fine for my needs.

The sliding table (which I don't have) takes knocks for having play and being difficult to install.

Would be work on the Supersaw. The front rail sits lower that the back rail - by design. A retrofit would take some engineering, or a fence manufacturer that's targetted the Supersaw. If you don't like the SuperSaw's fence, as is, I'd steer clear of the saw.
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I agree, the fence works fine.
The sliding table is difficult to install. It weighs 75 pounds and creates hernias. Play? Not on mine. Its solid as a rock. Anyone who says its worthless, obviously has not used one.

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Wish the fence was a tad taller and the t-slots were moved up higher as well. Find them a little low for some of the featherboards I have. But, nothing fatal, nothing that can't be fixed with an Aux Fence.
Have you had to replace the Timing Belt yet? Mine lasted 10 months - which I hear is pretty good for early buyers of the saw.
I think someone else had a good description of the saw - "a system". E.g. - you need an adaptor plate for the tenoning jig; you needed to buy an dado insert specifically for the SuperSaw; you'll likely never get an aftermarket fence on it; etc.
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No belt yet, but I'll probably buy a spare when they come back into stock (Feb 11).
When I bought the saw, I was not a very knowledgeable buyer. I just thought it was a nice saw and liked the dealer. I've been pretty happy with it. My next saw will be about $4000, so this one may be with me a long, long time.
Bob

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Ignore question about Timing Belt - see from above, yours is still alive and kicking. That's great news. I actually got a very early SuperSaw - Oct 2002 from Amazon.
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_firstname_@lr_dot_los-gatos_dot_ca.us wrote in

<snippage of project details>
Working outside in Northern California is GREAT, isn't it? Though there are few basements in my town, because of the water table. I have my 'studio' in what most folks would call a garage. When the weather is good, as it happens to be today, the big door goes up, and the outfeed table on the Unisaw folds out into the fresh air. On many weekends, my buddy across the street has his door open, and his big iron rolled out, just so he can find room to work.
What I move to the driveway is my assembly table, or the planer, or a number of sawhorses. I could get the Unisaw over the expansion joint, but the slope of the driveway would be a pain. That being said, for your 3/4" door threshold, consider cutting a couple of boards to use as ramps, to make rolling over the threshold easier. If they are wide enough, a standard base should work.
When researching saws, it became pretty clear that if you want the option to upgrade fences and the like, you probably need to stay away from the DeWalt or Jet hybrids. Those are 'system' saws, if you will, with proprietary accessories & parts. Aftermarket stuff will likely be unavailable, or late for those tools. The recommendations of the others to look at better contractor saws is sound, IMO.
Patriarch
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HI there
I got out to the shop and measured the DW746. 31.5" front rail to back rail. Hope this helps you out.
Chef
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*THAT* issue is solvable by building a removable ramp that fits over the threshold. give it about 18" of 'flat' on each side of the threshold, and slope to ground-level over a foot or so.

A Delta 10" contractor _will_ fit. Without fence rails.
I know, because I've _done_ it. getting it into the rear bedroom of my Condo.
<wry grin>
The Delta, with only a left wing, needs about 30-1/2" clearance side to side, not counting the rails. I just re-measured, to confirm.
However, the all-steel non-adjustable Delta mobile base makes for a problem, because _it_ needs another several inches for the rollers and lever-handle.
The "Hercules" mobile base -- made by Jet, I think; seen at Home Depot -- has the 'works' _inside_ the legs. Should clear the doorway with no problem.
Based on my measurements, I'd think pretty much _any_ contractor saw would fit -- the base table width of 22" is pretty much an industry standard.
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