Table Saw dust collection questions

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:-o How can we create sad dust? :-)
I also think relative humidity has an effect, both of the wood and surrounding air. Here in Phoenix it's usually so dry that static electricity is a huge problem causing static cling. I've moved "dust" around (Swingman's method) inside the cabinet saw only to have it re-stick somewhere else. Type of wood is also a factor. Face milling poplar (Sears pos profile cutters) caused a huge build-up inside while doing the same task with maple did not.
Gary
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Would you not be "sad" if you cut your hand on the TS? LOL

Agreed, as well as type of blade. It seems the my Forrest General blade produces higher piles of saw dust than my old Systematic Combo blade. That may be my imagination though.
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The folks on TeeVee never get covered in router shavings as I was this afternoon.
What gives? <G>
Happy New Year to all!
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OK, here's what seems to be working the best so far. I've pretty much made a small downdraft in the bottom of my cabinet saw by putting a piece of plywood with holes and a "funnel" in the cabinet base. It goes something like this, from the bottom up: The factory floor of the saw slopes toward the DC port. The edges of the facory floor were sealed up with duct tape. I then took a piece of plywood about the same size square as the facory floor and mounted it just above the DC port and sealed it up with duct tape (Again, think downdraft table). Two blocks were added on one side between the two floors to keep the plywood level instead of angled like the factory floor. I then drilled a series of 5 3/4" evenly spaced holes right down the center of the plywood directly inline with the DC port. I tried just using pegboard, a series of 1" holes in plywood and a series of 1/2" holes in plywood. It seemed anything less than 3/4" would just clog, and too many 1" holes would lessen the suction to the point where it just didn't work either. I may refine the number and size of holes a little, but I think 3/4" is a good start between keeping good suction and not to small as to clog. I then cut two pieces of plywood and put them in the cabinet to form a "V". They basically create a slope (or funnel) on either side of the cabinet to direct the dust toward the 5 holes I drilled in the plywood. I just finished ripping a bunch of wood into about 400 lf of 1/4" pieces to check how this would perform in real world use. The cabinet only has about a quart or so of dust in the bottom around the holes and has seemed to stabilized there. However, some dust did gather on the outsides of the funnel where there is no holes for dust collection. I need to refine this a litle yet to keep dust out of those areas (more duct tape??) In any case, I'm gonna look over Bill Pentz site this eve (between beers) and see if there is any ideas to refine this thing further. I 'd guess the best DC would be a shroud that would fit around the blade, but it just doesn't seem possible with my saw. As it is though, I've managed to make great progress in a few hours with just 3 pieces of plywood and some duct tape. Will report back with future refinements and some pics soon. Happy New Year! --dave
Dave Jackson wrote:

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I have looked over Pentz's site several times, have a cartridge filter on a HF dust collector w" 6" tubing, a hepa room filter and a hepa shopvac filter for my 6" RO. I was still nervous until I found this study of a refinishing shop
http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/media/m3tgpnrqqh22jryxvcby/contributions/e/n/l/8/enl87py4fytrrdr7.pdf
It shows a shop with no dust collection using a 6" RO sander generating just barely above even the new air quality standards (1.4 mg/m3) for fine particulates. I could see an argument that they would build up over time, but this should have been included in the measurements since these guys weren't collecting their dust at all.
This does not address the issues with the larger particles (above 2.5u) but those are not as serious as the ones associated with the smallest particles (and the most expensive dust collection solutions) and the most paranoia. It also doesn't address cleanliness and other issues with wood dust and chips.
Just another data point for those working their way down to a clean room like I am.
snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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: I have looked over Pentz's site several times, have a cartridge filter : on a HF dust collector w" 6" tubing, a hepa room filter and a hepa : shopvac filter for my 6" RO. I was still nervous until I found this : study of a refinishing shop
: http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/media/m3tgpnrqqh22jryxvcby/contributions/e/n/l/8/enl87py4fytrrdr7.pdf
What is the title or author of the paper? This link gets me to T&F's main page only.
    -- Andy Barss
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I found it
     http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/link.asp?id=enl87py4fytrrdr7
Andrew Barss wrote:

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My old Jet had the same problem until I taped over the vent louvers and added sheet metal that sloped down to the dust port. I had so much dust collect in it before the mods that it caught fire when I was cutting a 45 degree bevel. The blade and belts squeezed the excess dust against the side and it resulted in a friction fire. Guess where the fire extinguisher was? Not anywhere near the shop.
Jim

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wrote:

I have the same situation with my dust collector; every once in a while I will (with the saw OFF) stick an jet nozzle from my air compressor down into the throat area while the dust collector is on and point it around at different areas. In a couple of minutes the saw cabinet is cleaned out.
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Stop looking down in that cabinet !!!
Build yourself a ramp of some sort that helps the dust get to the pipe and forget the stuff in the corners.
I do mine with a shop vac "about" every quarter and that seems to be enough.
I let this same problem annoy me for a couple of years and decided it was not worth the effort.
Dave Jackson wrote:

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Pat Barber wrote:

At least somebody said it... <G>
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B A R R Y wrote:

You know how sometimes you want to make some filler and you have some glue and you need some sawdust of the same wood so you can mix up a little batch right on the spot?
The corners inside the cabinet are a good place to look. The top layer is usually the sawdust I'm looking for.
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wrote:

When that high torque motor starts up with a bang think about all the sound and vibration dampening you get with that dust in there.
The latest Delta Unisaw design works the best, chute and port in line with the blade and gull wings on each side to discourage settling.
When shop expansion completed and I can finally have dust collection, I think I'll be satisfied for a long time just not having to crawl under that saw (and everything else) every week or so to clean out the dust.
15" planer rolls to the back of the shop and discharges out the barn doors, pitch fork works well to bag it up.
Dedicated shop vac for the drum sander. Still roll it to the back of the shop.
Frank
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I have a related question. My Unisaw does an OK job with the dust not settling much in the cabinet but with a zero clearance insert I get a lot of sawdust on top of the saw. I am thinking of getting the shark guard and wondered if you put the dust collection hose only on the guard or y them and have a hose on both. Also, has anyone had experience with his newer 4" port model and is it worth the clumsiness of dealing with a 4" instead of the smaller hose hanging from the ceiling? Thanks, Mike.
Dave Jackson wrote:

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