surfacing resawn tiger maple


Planer seems to tearout more and more the thinner it gets, handplanes tearout a bit, and the drum sander's temporarily out of commission. Any suggestions?
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Have you tried spraying the board with a mist of water before running it through the planer? I am sure that you have already thought of this, but make sure your knives are really sharp and you are taking the lightest cut possible.
Bob McBreen
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Sharpened the knives just before trying it, tried the water misting.
I can get a reasonably decent surface if it's > 1/2", but when it gets thinner than that, I start getting huge 3/32" or deeper tearout spots
On Sun, 01 Feb 2004 16:02:51 -0800, RWM wrote:

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tmbg wrote:

Have you tried running the piece through taped to a backer board? Maybe there is too much flex at the thinner thicknesses that the backer board would eliminate.
Gary

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: Planer seems to tearout more and more the thinner it gets, handplanes : tearout a bit, and the drum sander's temporarily out of commission. Any : suggestions?
handtool way: use a scraper. power tool way: build a sled on which you mount a router. Put in a flat bottomed bit. Build runners to either side of the maple piece, equal height, and run the router back and forth, up and down. Then sand.
    -- Andy Barss
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How about a scraper?
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On Sun, 01 Feb 2004 21:28:47 -0800, Nate Perkins wrote:

I've used a scraper, it's just really slow and tedious...
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Just yesterday I was working on some quilted maple and getting some tearout even with my best planes. The solution: Lee Valley scraper plane (their variation on the old Stanley #112). Cleaned it up in short order.
Alternatively, if you have a #80 scraper, you can make it go almost as fast, but you have to be a bit more careful to keep the board flat.
Chuck Vance
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card scraper...
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Before I had a drum sander I would re-saw my figured wood with a carbide blade and then plane the back side. The planed side would tear out but the re-sawn side only took minimal sanding, worked great.
The carbide blades leave a nice smooth finish, probably because the tips are square on the sides instead of tweaked out like the bi-metal sort.
m

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My new WoodSlicer bandsaw blade leaves a much smoother surface than my old blade, and it's easier to surface.. Plus I got the widebelt running finally
On Mon, 02 Feb 2004 23:08:17 +0000, markm wrote:

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