Suggestions for cuting board finish?

Page 2 of 4  


Disagree. Oil that won't cure catches dust, doghair, greasy dirty fingerprints and food odors. Not to mention sheltering bacteria from your detergent.

If he's going to use it in a restaraunt he'll conform with local health regulations. We used to salt our tallow and lard-laden boards every night back in the days.

Bare is best, cured oil second.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I was suggesting Mineral Oil for looking pretty not for use. Hopefully in a restaurant this would be dusted once in a while and hopefully would not be getting any DOG HAIR on it. ;~)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Unless it was a Chinese restaurant...

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I was going to add that but then I was trying to play nice. ;~)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
woodman wrote:

Wok your puppy?

--
--
--John
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, this IS Mexico... Hopefully it won't be getting any dog MEAT on it..
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I wish I had some of my shop projects from that era. That is a long time ago.
Just a suggestion, maybe the wife would appreciate a NEW cutting board.
<d, r & h>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote

ago.
I still have a wrought iron magazine rack that I designed and made out of 1/8" thick x 1" wide band iron, rivited with 3/8" wide rivits pounded with a ball peen hammer. I made that the same year.

Actually, just before we bought our first house 26 years ago I built her a roll around Maple butcher block trimmed with Padauk. She prefers the one I made in school. It is easer to rinse off/clean under the faucet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mon, Oct 15, 2007, 9:13pm (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@swbell.net (Leon) doth remember: <snip> I made a maple cutting board/block in 1969 in Jr. High shop class. To this day my wife uses it every day and it is still just fine <snip>
Heh. Gotcha beat. Still got a solid cherry bookcase I had to design, draft a plan of, then build, in shop, era '55-56.
JOAT "I'm an Igor, thur. We don't athk quethtionth." "Really? Why not?" "I don't know, thur. I didn't athk."
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Must just be for use... I eat there a lot and have never seen it..

That was my thought.. might be safer and faster, too..

I hadn't even thought about planing.. have to see if it just needs sanding or if the planer would be a good idea first..
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 16 Oct 2007 08:35:25 -0700, mac davis

I ended up planing it, both to get rid of some deep cuts and because of a couple cracks between boards were starting to widen. I had to cut the board down to get it through the planer anyhow, I simply cut it apart at the cracks, planed it to uniform thickness and reglued. You can't tell there were ever any problems.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 17 Oct 2007 19:01:56 GMT, Brian Henderson

Good point! I have no idea how wide this beast is.. might not fit in the planer..
mac
Please remove splinters before emailing
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 15 Oct 2007 21:13:00 GMT, "Leon"

Same here. I've got a built-in cutting board in the kitchen that was made sometime in the 50s and it does just fine with no or minimal finish on it. About a year ago, I took it out and planed it to take out some of the marks that couldn't be easily sanded out, reassembled it and put it back without oil and it's doing just fine.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Mineral Oil
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This thread comes along every few months, and I always get a chuckle. Being ever the empiricist, I have observed the following:
I have made most of the turners, spoons, serving ware and utility utensils we use in our very busy kitchen. There is an assortment of woods, and each has been treated with different oils and oil/wax blends. No difference in smell, texture, wear or anything else has been noticed by myself or SO.
And then I think... If I am so scared of uncured oils penetrating my treenware, why do I use them on my wok? Why do I use them for frying and stirring? Surely turning a piece of fatty fish (salmon) fish quick seared at high heat would encompass the fears of some here, no?
Or turning burgers in a teflon skillet with my white oak wide body turner... wouldn't those fats work their way into the wood? One would think. But so far, no problems. Wash, dry, put in rack. With about 25 or so turners, spoons, stirrers and testing spoons I don't have ANY smells from anything on these utensils. They have been in use for years now.
And what about that cutting board. After reading these threads I think well... should I cut that damn brisket or dismantle those ribs on that wooden thing or not? Hot grease and meat juice would certainly penetrate the wood and not only smell to high heaven after it goes rancid, but it could make any or all of sick.
Thankfully, years and years of cutting up raw meats, sausages, cooked meats and vegetables of all types on wooden boards sealed with whatever I have on hand when I think they need a little quick moisture have resulted in no foul odors, no mildew, no sickness.
You should put whatever you want on your board, understanding that the oils offer little or no protection. What is important is that you clean them properly and allow them to dry thoroughly when changing preparations.
BTW, I learned from an amigo of mine that worked in a butcher shop for years that they NEVER clean the butcher block with any kind of soap, water, or detergent, nor do they put any finish on it.
After a hard day of hacking and chopping, they cleaned the block off as best they could with a towel, scraped it with a cabinet scraper, and scrubbed the daylights out of it with a lemon that was cut in half, then mashed into kosher salt for grit.
My personal obervation after sawing into a board with test oils on them is that while they make make the wood more attractive, they coatings don't do much on cutting boards or tools.
I do like the walnut oils on bowls, etc. that can have liquid collect in the bottom. Mike Mahoney makes a special curing walnut oil for bowls that is supposed to be great, and that should work as well as anything else for light wood protection.
As always....
Just my 0.02.
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
chuckle. <snip>
I'm curious.
In this day and age of low cost, FDA approved, polypropolene cutting boards, why bother making a wooden one except as a display piece or a gift.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Actually, some folks have run an entirely new battery of tests that indicate that the old woodies are safer for the kitchen than plastic due to the grooves left by a sharp knife. With a plastic board, the soft plastic simply rolls over on either side of the groove left when cutting. Examination of my own polyprop boards revealed this scratchy feeling surface. On a wood board, cutting raises the cut grain, and the raised/severed fibers are knocked, rubbed, flecked, or washed off, leaving the clean groove behind with nothing to hold the bacteria.
I willingly admit that in practical application the difference in the two may not amount to a fart in a tornado, but no one likes facts like this group.
I personally like the wooden cutting boards as their bulk an weight make them better suited to my cutting style, and while it may be my imagination, it seems my knives stay sharper longer on the wood boards.
Robert
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 17 Oct 2007 01:40:18 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

I remember reading some of those studies years ago. University of Wisconsin comes to mind, but memory may have faded.
Conclusion was that while all cutting boards can have bacteria after use, the manmade materials would continue to allow bacteria growth, while something about wood inhibits the growth and time would take care of any residual critters.
Frank

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 17 Oct 2007 06:59:10 -0500, Frank Boettcher wrote:

Here are two, with references to other articles:
http://foodsafety.ifas.ufl.edu/HTML/il114.htm http://cals.arizona.edu/pubs/health/foodsafety/az1076.html
--
Art Greenberg
artg at eclipse dot net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Like Robert, I prefer wood but that's just "because". I am surprised at the results you quote above. I would have thought exactly the opposite to be true. In fact, I might even say "are you sure?..."
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.