Stroke sander

While in Virginia, I purchased a stroke sander, it will sand a panel about 6 foot by 9 foot, I'll put pictures up when we are reunited(it is still in VA. it was too big to haul in pickup or small trailer.)
I hope to have it at my place sometime next week, I'll make the decision then to either run it with an inverter or change to single phase motor.
It was in a lot of miss. equipment and also wound up with a couple of shaper spindels, heads and roller beds all for $250.
basilisk
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Sounds like a good deal. A number of questions come to mind.
1) Where are you going to put that monster?
2) What do you work on that would require a sander that big?
3) How would a stroke sander be better than a drum sander?
4) Transportation, installation, wiring and/or a new motor is going to cost some money. How much do you think you will be into it when all is said and done?
5) Will this fit into you new shop building?
6) Speaking of your new shop building, how is that coming along?
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On Thu, 30 Aug 2012 13:07:11 -0400, Lee Michaels wrote:

In my new shop

Nothing in particular, I do build tables sometimes.

Different beast that overlap in function, A stroke sander can accept thick material or assemblies as much as 2 foot thick, most(all?) drum sanders cannot.
With the sliding table combined with the operators reach and turning the panel 180 degrees in sander, it would be possible to sand as wide as possibly 10 feet, can't think of a reason to do this, but I do odd stuff some times.
Stroke sanders are very fast, and allow even allow some work on gently curved surfaces.

The trip to VA was a equipment buying expedition for my place of employment, so anything I buy gets to tag along for free as long as I don't get greedy.
Installation isn't any more complicated than setting up a table saw.
options for powering the sander will be the costliest part, one option is to use an inverter, rather expensive. Two would be to swap motor entirely, also rather expensive unless I can find a deal on 5hp single phase motor(possible). or thirdly match nameplate speed of present three phase motor to a 1hp single phase motor run them in tandem, the 3 phase motor with capacitors would act as its own inverter and the single phase motor would cover the power loss from the missing leg on the 3 phase motor and make the whole mess self starting. This is simple mechanically but rather involved on the wiring.
At any rate there is little odd and ends of repair work to do and the electrical, all should be less than $500, making a total of $750.

Yes.
Rain, Rain, Rain , finally managed to get all the blocks delivered last Saturday, took so long that the mason took a little brick job ahead of me, I don't blame him for that, he needs to live too.
He should start laying block on Monday.
basilisk

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I'll make the decision then to either run it with an inverter or change to single phase motor.
Cool
I bought a 3hp rotatry converter to power an old PM TS I got at a school auction (since sold). Turned out to be a blessing as I later found a 3ph PM shaper and 3ph Ritter edge sander and 3ph PM jointer that no one was buying becuase they were 3ph and I got great deals. So converter gives you new options.
I theorize that most pro shops that would have 3ph don't buy old used equip and most hobbiests can't handle 3ph so it creates the opportunity.
I also found a brand new converter on Craig's from a guy who found his new converter would only run his big metal cnc lathe on low capacity mode and died when he cranked it up so he had to upgrade and I got a deal.
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