Stock Room Supply Drum Sander

I was wondering if anyone has tried the Drum Sander Kit from Stockroom Supply?
http://www.stockroomsupply.com/V_Drum_Sander.php
I saw the company mentioned in an earlier post about sanding discs, and started poking around the site. The idea of the drum sander is intriguing - the sandpaper is velcroed to the drum, and the spinning action causes the paper to lift slightly from the drum, allowing air to circulate. Sounds like a pretty cool product, and I wonder if it really works.
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Mike wrote:

I saw them at the Nashville Woodworking Show, stood and watched all his demonstrations.
It was the savior of the show. I was thoroughly impressed. It worked extremely well in every application.
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-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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Mike wrote:

I've got the 18" kit. I used the motor from an old dryer to power it.
I don't use it much--I made my own table and the top is not absolutely flat. In their design this is absolutely critical otherwise you get snipe and uneven sanding. It may be worth getting their top due to this issue.
I have used it for a few things, and eventually I'll make a new top and it may become more useful.
The dust does generally drop straight down as advertised, and the paper doesn't gum up or burn.
One thing to consider is that in the normal configuration this is not a thickness sander. It's almost more like an abrasive jointer.
Chris
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I've got a bunch of melamine laminated particle board shelves laying around from old office cabinets - they make really great shop fixtures. Might be a good application - do you know how much material you need on each side of the drum? (if you have the 18" drum, how wide overall is your top?)
A few other posters mentioned that this setup would not work as a thicknesser - I agree. I'm thinking that I could use the planer to get stock to within a very close tolerance of the desired thickness and then run it through the drum sander to clean up the mill marks left from the planner (unless I've just changed the blades that day!)
Who knows - if their kit is basically a drum wrapped in velcro with the necessary bearings, how tough could it be to make the whole thing on my own?
The only thing I hate more than sanding, is paying for something that I can make myself!
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Mike wrote:

The guy was using it as a planer/jointer and it was much faster.
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-MIKE-

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Kitchen countertop material is great for the same. I made a multi-purpose station (miter saw, sander, 9" bandsaw, etc.) out of some old kit. cabs and countertop I got from the local "freecycle". Two cabinets with countertop with a recess between that is just the right depth for the miter saw.
Ed
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I think maybe the posting about "Laminating sheet metal" posted yesterday is from a guy who is currently building one of these. People who have them seem to like them but yes, not like a formal drum sander that can be used to control accurate thickness but a good wide surface sanding solution.

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That would be me, and nope. Mine is a thickness sander, and I think if you are going to have a drum sander you really should have the ability to sand to parallel surfaces and to thickness, which you can't do either with that design.
This is the original version I used for 3-4 years, and it has a couple links to where I got a lot of my info. It was really made with a lot of compromises that ended up being not good choices, and I learned a lot about what didn't work. But still it worked well enough, and was still working. And I don't own a planer so it gets used a whole lot.
http://www.krtwood.com/sander.html
The new version has a plywood case. The table pivots on steel pins in bronze bushings rather than from a hinge, flanged bearings rather than pillow blocks, and the belt is on the outside of the case. That made it much easier to set it up with the table pivoting parallel to the drum. It uses the same paper clamping system, but I used MDF discs instead of the half rounds. I had to cut the paper to length on the old one, now it's sized to fit the paper, and it's now 18" long so it holds two full sheets. Which is great being able to set up half 60 grit, half 120 grit for anything narrower than 9".
The titling table is not ideal for long stock as it's hard to set up support, but I did up to 14"x44" hard maple panels on the old version. On the new version I shifted the table toward the back more where you need more help holding it. I have it set so that's close to level at 3/4" from the drum, though that's out the window now that I have to recover the top. It's not ideal for long stock, but really excels the smaller type of things I mainly do and can be pressed into handling the long stuff. It's as much a question of technique, as trying to maintain a constant feed rate while you are switching your hands around is difficult. If that was your primary use for it I would say suck it up and buy a performax.
I am going to be putting up the plans for free, and offering a very limited quantity of kits for sale. I have one extra 18" drum made, and two 9" intended more for model makers. Back three years ago after I went through it the first time and figured out how I should have made it, I got excited and bought a bunch of materials and had 100 MDF discs cnc'd. And then I thought about the liability issues. But I've needed more width capacity, so I dusted it all off and figured I'd at least make enough to use up most of the parts I had. I have been sick the past few days so I haven't finished getting the website up, but by the end of the week it should be up.
-Kevin
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Mike wrote:

Holy cripes, that thing has an exposed motor and belt! That's downright dangerous, and there outa be a law. A guy could get his short and curlies hung up in that thing!
--
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Steve Turner wrote:

You woodwork in the nude, too?
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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-MIKE- wrote:

Nudity - it's not just for drummers any more! :-)
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If you think nobody cares, try missing a couple of payments.
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Looked at flicker and saw the ole Ghost pedal. Brings back memories. Back in the day that was the only pedal I could use for my right foot that wouldn't snap in half once I got pounding. However, to get the action I wanted I had to spin the cups to the max tension and I'd break the springs every few months instead. It got so I could disassemble and replace the springs in a matter of a minute or two. Even then the flanges on the cups would eventually wear out and wouldn't hold on any longer. I had a pile of those things laying around.
Now I use the Pearl Eliminators for bass pedal and High Hat. Pearl used to be cheap stuff back in the day but their eliminator stuff is fricking awesome.

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SonomaProducts.com wrote:

I always wanted a Ghost pedal (the marketing in those old catalogs used to work wonders on me as an impressionable teenager) but I never got to play one; had to resort to Speed Kings instead.

Yep, I use the same thing. Eliminator pedals are very highly regarded in the drumming community.
--
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Yeah, I never understood all the hype on Ghost pedals. I remember thet were just idolized and I bought into it. When I got my first one I was so dissapointed when it was so sloooow I went back to the speed king. But once I put on some weight and muscle I could snap a speed king pedal at will so I pulled the ghost back out with it's fricking thick platform pedal and just maxed the tension to get some action.

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SonomaProducts.com wrote:

That's like going from a Chevette to a Pinto. :-)
--

-MIKE-

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-MIKE- wrote:

LOL. Yeah well, that's about all we had in those days. A lot of amazing drummers managed to pull off some pretty amazing tricks in their Chevettes and Pintos :-)
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Steve Turner wrote:

My first pedal was a Squeak King. Took me years to get over the bad technique that thing caused me to develop. :-)
--

-MIKE-

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