Staining knotty pine


What's the secret to keeping the stain even?
Thanks,
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In my experience, I find it helps to at least sand to around 600 before staining. Then do your finer sanding afterwards. Restaining or touch up staining followed by very fine sanding to finalize may be in order. But also keep in mind the characteristics of different stains. Myself, I like to use Minwax, Provincial Stain without poly. I never use the poly included stains unless I am doing small scroll projects that does not matter about details. I find that minwax has the best covering stains and always use a lint free cloth.
--
Billy Gurley
Cameron, NC
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You might be thrilled with the results of General Finishes, Bartleys, and or Zar stains if you are impressed with Minwax stains.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
BILLY GURLEY wrote:

gallons of elbow grease for every gallon of stain. Two coats, a good rub after the second coat seems to take care of most of the blotching. Whats left is character.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks, everyone, for your help with this.
Mike

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 19 Jan 2006 16:14:18 GMT, "Michael"

Use cherry instead of pine ? 8-)
Pine varies in its absorbency, so any "stain" (meaning a pigment that soaks _into_ the timber) is going to end up blotchy.
Instead you can pre-condition the pine with a coat of thinned shellac, then apply a glaze instead of a stain (a pigment that sits on the surface of the timber).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'll second the shellac recommendation - it is good for sealing knots in particular. If you don't use some kind of sanding sealer or sealer coat before your stain, it will almost definitely end up splotchy on pine. Test on scrap as always. Andy
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Michael wrote:

If you don't want to start with shellac etc.
JES
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 19 Jan 2006 16:14:18 GMT, "Michael"

Well, you can't. But you can minimize the blotches...
use light stains, such as honey pine use gel stains use a wood conditioner or spit coat shellac use less stain on the end-grain areas sand properly avoid excessive use of glue practice on scrap pieces
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I use Spruce/ Pine almost exclusively. I use a Minwax natural (clear) as a base, then a Minwax stain , then the finish. The clear evens out the wood for staining, knots and all including areas of the wood that may be spalted. Put the clear on, wait a day before staining.
The clear will show up any obvious areas that need more sanding almost as well as a stained coat will.
Pete
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I do pretty much all my projects in pine. I recently gave this product a try https://ssl.sogetel.net/aquashine/boutique_en/saman.asp Its almost like a waterbased gel stain. A bit pricey, but it covers very well and doesn't blotch at all.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.