SQ Cutting Sequence for Picture Frames

SQ= Stupid Question. Too often I start overthinking the numerous ways of doing something, in this case the correct sequence of cutting a piece of wood into 4 frame strips with 45 degree corners.
Would like to use my Delta miter saw, which is tuned up perpendicular to the fence and with accurate 45s. Has accurate stops right and left of blade. The stock is 1" wide, jointed and planed to be square and correct thickness. It is plenty long enough to get 4 sides. ______________________________________________________ |                                    |    FACE 1 & FACE 2                             | |_________________________________________    ____________|                                | END A|                             END B        
Does one ever flip over the stock so the cut goes through the face of A & B? This allows using just one side of the blade and not moving the miter guide.
Is cutting on both sides of the blade with right side using left pointing angle and right side using right pointing angle preferable?
What about Using just one side of the blade and moving the miter gauge?
In a perfect world with a perfect setup , all the above should give the same results. BUT, the saw or the stock probably is less than PERFECT. Which gives the best results?
How do you do it?
Re the interesting ( to me, anyway) topic of choosing among options. I will set up a separate thread so as not to confuse this technical one.
                
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On Sat, 17 Jan 2004 18:55:21 -0500, Cape Cod Bob

That was a serious question. Someone here must have either knowledge or an opinion.
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"Cape Cod Bob" wrote in message

Just my experience and opinion. As long as the miter saw is accurate and the stock is flat, you can be successful without moving the blade to the opposite side and just flipping the stock to cut opposing faces, however, I rarely use a miter saw for cutting precision miters any longer.
I cut mine with a table saw miter sled, where sequence of cut makes a difference because of the design of the jig.
IOW, you cut opposing miters on opposite sides of the jig, with the same face always up. By doing so you guarantee a ninety degree miter joint because of complementary angles.
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OK.... sigh.....

Let's assume that your frame molding is pre finished, so you can't fill and sand, since I think that is the scenario you're asking about.

1) OK so far. assuming that this saw gives accuracy and clean enough cuts (no chips and clean glue line) there's no reason not to use it.

miter guide? are we now talking about cutting these on a table saw?
assuming that the stock is square in cross section, no problem. if it means you will be balancing the frame molding on some curved profile to get it at the right angle it would be easier to swing the saw, if it's a chop saw or the miter guide if it's a table saw. also see 1)

it might be, if the saw is tending to chip out at the beginning or end of the cut. in general, the acute angle (thin edge, long side) of a miter cut is more fragile than the obtuse angle (thick edge, short side), and will probably tend to chip more. another factor will be which direction the blade is passing through the material. also see 1)

might also work. how good is your saw tuned up and how accurate and repeatable is your miter gauge?

if the stock varies in width you will have to choose whether having the inside corners or the outside corners match is more important to you. if the thickness varies you can probably get away with having the faces flush and the backs a little wonky. if the squareness of the stock varies the error will either cances itself or double itself.

since the saw and stock are in your shop I can't say.
depending what the wood is like, how sharp the blade is, how steady my hand is, how big a hurry I'm in, what moon is in virgo and prolly other things I haven't thought of I can get different results. try out different setups and use the one that works best.

I built a miter sled. most of the time I use that, but sometimes I use a chop saw and lion trimmer. sometimes I use the sled and the trimmer. if the stock is small enough I might just use the trimmer.

ya well, you know what they say about opinions.....
good luck and keep us up to date with what works for you....     Bridger
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