Simple chair plan?

I have actual need for a chair, with minimal armrests, otherwise as simple as possible without looking 'funny'.
Inexpensive tools available: Table Saw Scroll saw Drill Press Table-mounted router (1/4" drive) Small disc/belt sander Various hand tools
Material: 3/4" Cherry (from Rockler): 12 bd-ft?
Skill level is moderate at best. Should be OK thru mortise/tenon. Have never bent wood.
Anyone know of a plan that could easily be modified and doesn't look too tacky?
TIA, Peetie
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On 2/6/2012 1:44 PM, Peetie Wheatstraw wrote:

Someone posted a picture one this morning on G+ that is a child's chair that looks like it would be fun to build, and it would lend itself for modification, or perhaps give you some ideas.
Be aware that the comfort in a chair comes from some pretty specific angle and measurements and that conform to the human body ... this one, being square, would be very easy to make, even when making it a straight up and down adult chair, but it may not be any more comfortably than a flat bench:
http://www.rockerlaneworkshop.com/products/images/08__chair_child__square_kid__001.jpg
Simply some food for thought ...
--
www.eWoodShop.com
Last update: 4/15/2010
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"Swingman" wrote

http://www.rockerlaneworkshop.com/products/images/08__chair_child__square_kid__001.jpg
That is very true. Although, in my experience, where a bench is provided, they don't want you sitting there very long. I can think of some restaurants and summer camps growing up. Sorta like those plastic chairs at McDonalds. Eat your food and get outa here!
I remember a couple back woods craftsman, growing up, who made chairs. They took lots of measurements and built it to fit that person. This custom fitted chair was only comfortable for about half the people who sat on it. Absolute heaven for its intended body. One of these guys also made custom pack frames. A lot of hunters around there used those to pack out their deer.
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I remember a couple back woods craftsman, growing up, who made chairs. They took lots of measurements and built it to fit that person. This custom fitted chair was only comfortable for about half the people who sat on it. Absolute heaven for its intended body. One of these guys also made custom pack frames. A lot of hunters around there used those to pack out their deer. ************************************************************* Several years ago, a friend and I found ourselves wanting to make a set of outdoor furniture. The seat and back had curves to fit the butt and back. Thing is, he is about 5'4" and I am 6'0", and we kept on sculpting it and dis/re-assembling it until it was comfortable for both of us. We called it "the most comfortable chair in the world" chair. Where did I put those patterns? Hummm.
-- Jim in NC
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On Mon, 6 Feb 2012 17:16:52 -0500, "Lee Michaels" <leemichaels*nadaspam* at comcast dot net> wrote:

seat height and tilt, the arm height and tilt, and the back tilt. If you build custom chairs for people, you could have them come in for the sittings and measurements.

Heavy loads!
-- Energy and persistence alter all things. --Benjamin Franklin
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I have seen a lot of these built. I actually sat in one, and it was quite nice. At one time, this chair was so popular that the builder's even had their own little blog or forum, although I couldn't find it.
https://www.google.com/search?q=jakes+chair+modifications&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a
Read a few of the posts on that page and you can get a feel for the chair and its popularity.
Some guys made these for inside sitting or reading chairs. Modifications I remember seeing were raising the chair height, the parallel leg surfaces were thinned out with scroll work, the armrests were a bit shorter and a bit less wide, and the splats were straightened, thinned and had some scroll work on them. The finished product looked like a fancy "Mission" style mixed with some of the design elements of the 1800s English oak furniture.
Nice cushions were made for the seat, and with the carved (jigsaw/ bandsaw scrollwork) backs, no one would have recognized it as a modified Adirondack chair.
Some of it looked pretty damn good.
Plans are free.
Robert
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