Shop Layout Feedback

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I have a approximately 20x30 space for my shop. I've been working on designing where all the tools will go, and would like some feedback on the design.
A couple notes: - The grinder, sander, and drill press will be separated and placed along the back wall. I just didn't bother adding stands. - I plan on building a bench in the upper left hand corner (next to the ladder), but haven't gotten around to modeling it yet. - The "plywood storage" is a large assembly table with storage underneath.
http://puckdroppersplace.us/other/garage.jpg
Puckdropper
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Never teach your apprentice everything you know.

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On 06/03/2010 06:18 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

This might help:
http://grizzly.com/workshopplanner.aspx
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That's an "interesting" layout in the Grizzly example.
A full-fledged fireplace, with a hearth, in a workshop?
A laundry room/bathroom sticking into the shop?
Use a wood stove instead and flatten the laundry room against a wall.
2 OT questions:
How common are laundry room/bathroom combinations these days?
How many people let their dogs hang out in their shops? (look in front of the fireplace)
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I started with that, and found Grizzly doesn't have any CMS on there at all. Since it's one of my most used tools, I had to switch to something else.
Puckdropper
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On 03 Jun 2010 13:18:48 GMT, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote the following:

Oy vay! That's a _steep_ entrance you have into your shop, Pucky.
I think I'd prefer the workbench where the plywood storage area is now and put the storage on the wall. YMMV.
-- It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change. -- Charles Darwin
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The workbench area is already set up with pegboard, so it's a natural spot for a decent bench. It would be a nice spot for wood storage otherwise, though.
The door in the corner is at ground level, the ladder's just there for storage and access to storage above the utility room.
Puckdropper
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Puckdropper wrote:

We all need to arrange things to suit what we do and how we do it. For me, I would NOT want the "large assembly table with storage underneath". Here's why...
1. It is best to store sheet goods flat. Doing so virtually guarantees that the sheet you want will be on the bottom. I built one similar to this...
http://www.rd.com/images/tfhimport/2000/Sep00_Garage_Storage/20000901_Garage_Storage_page008img001_size2.jpg
a couple of years ago. Mine doesn't have the small vertical spaces, just two 12" wide full length ones. I keep full sheets on one side and (mostly) cut pieces on the other. It has worked out well.
2. For the stuff I make (cabinets, tables, desks, etc.), a table that size for assembly would be too big to be convenient, lots of extra walking, maybe hard to clamp stuff down where you want to clamp. My solution was a pair of tables, each 36" high, 48" long, 12" wide, on casters, tray in the bottom. I can use them together for either a wide surface or a long narrow one. They are also useful to hold a pile of stuff I am sawing or otherwise machining. ______________
You need to plan a spot for lumber storage. A rack on the bottom wall would work, looks like you could put both it and plywood there. FWIW, here is a link to a zip of pix and instructions for mine. http://mysite.verizon.net/xico/pix/lumber_rack.zip
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That looks like a better option, thanks. I've needed to work something out for plywood cut offs, and it looks like that'll take care of those needs.

I'm also a little worried about the horizontal surface curse. The mobile stands could also be used as infeed/outfeed support for sawing operations.
Good idea, thanks!

I was looking at something similar in the Woodcraft catalog yesterday. I'm debating whether or not there'd be room for narrow board storage behind the door (with the door open at 90-100 deg).
Not shown is a small bin under the SCMS for "stick storage."
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On 6/3/2010 8:18 AM, Puckdropper wrote:

Pretty pictures are for the women and their kitchens. This is a workshop man. You don't design a workshop unless you plan on installing drapes in the thing. Puckdropper???? You must play in a girls league.
Tools have to be arranged for practical reasons not to look good on a drawing. Put all the large tools on casters so that you can rearrange things as required, if required.
Once you've made a few yards of sawdust with each of those machines you'll know where they belong. As it sits now your probably going to have to move something to cut up a sheet of plywood. That will be after you have had to move the storage table so that you could get the plywood out in the first place. Remember that a sheet of plywood is 4 x 8 but you still need a few extra feet of space to fit your ass in. Where's the barrel for all the scrap pieces that are too good to throw away?
LdB
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It's not my fault the picture looks nice. :-p It is a diagram, using the computer to check for clearances and such. You're right about the plywood storage, but I think there's access to pull a full sheet out from there...

How do you put dust collection drops on casters?

The TS has a 6' "working clearance" front and back, with the space to adjust either end to 8'. Since it's on casters that's an easy thing to do.
I haven't quite figured out where the tall scrap bin is going to go. The shorter pieces can be stored under the CMS, but the taller ones need more height. It's penciled in for the corner by the bench, but I think it'll be too far away to be useful.
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On 6/3/2010 4:43 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

put a few long pipes across the tracks that can be pushed back and forth along the entire length of the garage door tracks and extensions. Think along the lines of a drop ceiling, two main T's with movable cross T's along their length.
I have a 4" flexible dust collector hose laying up there that drops down and can be positioned anywhere within that side of the garage area. I also have an extension cord modified to act as a dust collector switch running along with the hose. I can position the switch near the equipment that I'm using. The setup works like a skyhook. Takes a minute or two to position the switch and hose but I can set up equipment anywhere in that side of the garage and control the dust collector from that spot as well. I'm going to add a second hose up there one of these days for my drum sander. It's got two 4 " dust collector connections and up to now I've just stretched the second hose across the floor but that's not a particularly good idea.
http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?pQ505&cat=1,42401,62597,62604&ap=1
LdB
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On Jun 3, 6:18am, Puckdropper <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote:

I would have put my cutoff saw along the longest (back) wall.
It seems the jointer\planer would be in the way of you are breaking down full sheets of ply but maybe not if they are low enough
If you start much with rough lumber then I would suggest a good triangle of jointer, planer, table saw.
- Joint one face of each piece and stack convenient to planer - Plane opposite face stacking back by jointer - Run one edge on jointer, stacking by TS - Rip other edge of each piece for final square up.
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My CMS sticks out behind the bench a good 12-16", so I didn't want to get it up against the wall and have the whole table that far off the wall. I may be able to make it wider and place a few of the smaller power tools there.

I think the jointer bed is low enough (but I haven't assembled it yet.) If I rip first, I'll need only 24" on the side of the blade for breaking down plywood.

That's essentially what I've got. The only problem is the TS is turned around for it to be really conveinent. The jointer infeed is on the TS side, while the planer infeed is on the jointer's outfeed side.
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"Puckdropper" <puckdropper(at)yahoo(dot)com> wrote in message

Does anyone think that the DC might be moved closer to where it will be used? Bill
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Bill wrote: ...

'Pends on how big it is, air flow capacity-wise...
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It's a Clearvue Cyclone. With the recommended 6" ducts it ought to be enough to suck up everything it needs to.
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wrote the following:

Sure, Bill, but we were going to wait until he showed us the spaghetti he put up to the machines from the DC before hammering him on it. ;)
-- It is not the strongest of the species that survives, nor the most intelligent, but the one most responsive to change. -- Charles Darwin
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It's bucatini and macaroni. Spaghetti isn't hollow. ;-)
Actually, I was planning on running a main trunk on the ceiling to the planer/jointer/table saw, having another drop for SCMS, and running a line along the back wall for that. Simple and straight.
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I have a DC that uses 6" pipe also. I to use pvc to avoid the cost on complexity of metal piping. Was indeed worried about static sparks, etc. I did a lot of reading and ended up using 6" irrigation grade pvc, can't recall schedule. I also applied metal tape along the length, inside and out, even through the fittings so I have ground running from every machine all the way to the DC. I have never even had dust cling to the outside or ever seen a spark or any evidence of static build up.
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I would use 6" PVC (drainage stuff is far cheaper) but the fittings are confusing. How does one get from 6" PVC to 4" & 2.5" DC ports? It seems everything has a different "standard", including DC ports themselves.
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