Shop cabs - level or follow floor slope ?

I'm redoing the shop in my garage and am wondering if I should have the base cabs level or have them follow the slope of the floor. I'm leaning towards level (what I've had), but following the slope would allow the cabs, TS, shaper, etc to be on the same plane.
??
Thanks,
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Folklore wrote:

Build them square, level them w/ adjustable leg supports of whatever variety you choose...unless you're talking builtins that won't ever go anywhere else either within this space or somewhere else when/if you move and/or build another shop.
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Folklore wrote:

As in everything leaning? <G>
I prefer level.
An easy way to do this is to build 3-4" high bases, level them with shims, and sit your square cases on the now level foundation.
Recessing the bases makes for instant toe kicks.
Barry
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Level. Go the "low" side of the cabinet run and set your height. Let's say 30 inches. Now, go to the high side and measure the height. Let say that's 28". Now build all the cabinet carcasses. Make all the sides 30 inches in height. When you go to install the cabinets, trim off the appropriate material from the "high" side of the cabinet carcasses so that all surfaces are perfectly level.
Actually, a garage floor probably slopes towards the garage doors and towards the center of the garage, too. So the front of the cabinet is probably lower than right up against the wall. I just shimmed the front of my cabinets, and cut the toekick to exact size. But using one of those new laser levels, I'd probably take measurements at all four corners of the projected cabinets and use the lowest point as the starting point. That way, sides, toekicks, everything would be exact, and then support each other.
BTW, garages aside, it's not uncommon for older homes to experience noticeable unevenness in floors. And you would follow the same procedure.
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I went with level onna 'count of I don't like things that want to roll to go rolling off.
UA100
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Thanks everyone. level it is.
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been there, done that...
For me, it depends on what tools.... My garage is pretty typical, I think... slight slant towards the front for drainage...
The bench, RAS & router table, since they're lined up as one long surface, are adjusted by height and "continuing the surface"... I don't care if they're level, flat is more important to me..
The rolling stuff that doesn't "match up" with anything else, (lathe, tool chests, clamp/parts holder, CMS, sander, etc.), are pretty much level... but define level in a garage that slopes for drainage with rolling tools..lol It'a "level" as set up, but swing it 45 degrees for cutting a long board, and there goes the level..
mac
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"Folklore" wrote in message

Silly as it seems, also consider the impact of non-level on resale value if you can foresee selling in the future. I've seen less than that kill a deal ... and the phrase "not build to industry standard" often pops up on the housing front when justifying a lower price.
Shimming is just too easy.
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sure.. remind me about shimming NOW... lol I out adjustable casters on everything to make all the surfaces even...
mac
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Folklore wrote:

Stuff has a natural tendency to roll/jump/dive off anything above floor level when it's on a flat level surface. Why help them along?
How about tilting the tops towards the back, with a back lip - to make it harder for those suckers to hurt themselves in falls to the concrete floor?
charlie b
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