Shop Cabinet Door

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wrote:

OK, now it sounds more realistic. I use Waterlox, also a wiping varnish, but an oil-based liquid, not a gel. It could be used exactly the way you described the _second_ time. Your first post indicated that it was an apply/wipeoff one-time finish. Here you describe it better.
And if I ever find something Waterlox doesn't work well on, I may give Old Masters a try, but I'm not too keen on poly. Wiping varnishes have the advantage that they -don't- feel plasticky, as brushed varnishes do when they contain poly.
I tried Behlen's Rock Hard Tabletop varnish on my current dining set, and it was OK, but I really prefer a less-glossy finish on most everything. The 'hand' Waterlox gives is better, too. As an old girlfriend described it, "It's like a good condom. You can still feel the sensuous presence of the wood underneath." <chuckle>
-- You never hear anyone say, 'Yeah, but it's a dry cold.' -- Charles A. Budreau
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On 4/30/2012 9:00 AM, Larry Jaques wrote:

All gel's" those that I have seen" are all satin finish, and yes you want to touch the finish. Swingman and Nailshooter both have enjoyed, how shall I put this, touching the wood. LOL
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wrote:

Some are glossier than others, and some mfgr ratings of "satin" are more like a "semi-gloss" to me. YMMV. I use Waterlox Original in Satin. Most of the wipe-ons will go more glossy with more coats, despite any "satin" reference.

"Fondling the wood" is more evocative. <domg>
-- You never hear anyone say, 'Yeah, but it's a dry cold.' -- Charles A. Budreau
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On 4/28/2012 12:32 PM, Swingman wrote:

Made!
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I can't wait to see how Leon incorporates his pinned Domino construction into them.
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On 4/28/2012 9:55 PM, Dave wrote:

They are already done and I think IIRC used brad nails and glue. LOL
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On 4/28/12 11:26 AM, Swingman wrote:

https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/ChezPouletAustin_Ranchette02#5677889345052179698
By the way, do you do *anything* half assed? sheesh. :-)
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-MIKE-

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On 4/28/2012 12:22 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

LOL ... never when it comes to doing things for other people and expecting to be paid for it.
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On 4/28/2012 11:26 AM, Swingman wrote:

https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/ChezPouletAustin_Ranchette02#5677889345052179698
Wow. pretty nice for a bunch of chickens. <G>
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On 4/28/2012 12:33 PM, Steve Barker wrote:

Thanks ... gotta admit that the few folks I make them for are convinced their hens (all with names) deserve only the best. :0>
And, I hate to be called back before twenty years from date of purchase.
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Swingman wrote:

https://picasaweb.google.com/111355467778981859077/ChezPouletAustin_Ranchette02#5677889345052179698
I have actually seen people do a plunge cut with a jig saw, but I wouldn't want to try it on 3/4" plywood.
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G.W. Ross

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On 4/28/2012 4:29 PM, G.W. Ross wrote:

No kidding ... and it is almost impossible to start a jig saw "plunge cut" without some offcut/material sacrifice.
Without some practice, doing it with a circular saw is not all the straightforward either.
This is another one of those tasks where an actual _plunge_ saw excels ... go figure. ;)
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On Sat, 28 Apr 2012 19:34:49 -0400, "Mike Marlow"

How could you have missed all fifty threads in which we've discussed them over the past 2 years, Mike? Crikey!
-- You never hear anyone say, 'Yeah, but it's a dry cold.' -- Charles A. Budreau
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On Sat, 28 Apr 2012 21:23:10 -0400, "Mike Marlow"

And the patch still on the other one, eh, Matey? Arrrrrrrrrrrrr!
-- You never hear anyone say, 'Yeah, but it's a dry cold.' -- Charles A. Budreau
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On Sat, 28 Apr 2012 19:27:29 -0400, "Mike Marlow"

Little need to do much looking. It's one of the area where Festool track saws excel. Admittedly, DeWalt track saws also have the same capability.
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On 4/28/12 4:39 PM, Swingman wrote:

With a jig saw, it helps to sharpen the tip. You really have to pull forward while plunging to help stop it from pushing forward. I've done it and can get it pretty clean most of the time, but it's not something I'd want to "have to" do.
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I wonder if cutting a thinner slot using something like the HF multitool then plunging the jigsaw into that slot would help things out. Sometimes it does, sometimes it doesn't.
Of course, the easiest way to avoid the need for plunging is to make one continuous cut. I could round the corners and avoid the whole plunging issue all together. I'm reasonably certain the jigsaw will cut a penny- sized curve without trouble.
Puckdropper
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On 4/29/2012 12:53 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

Kerf size is different isn't it?

So, how you planning to start the cut without marring either the cutout and/or the remaining "frame"?
Depends upon the quality of level of cut you're willing to settle for.
Even with a good jig saw you are most likely going to have to dress up both sides of the cut around both the door and the remaining cabinet "frame", meaning your gap may get bigger than you originally intended ... and IME, it's hard to do that cleanup in a consistent manner with regard to material removed.
If you're willing to settle for an inset gap of say +/- 1/4" (or more), a top of the line well setup jig saw with new blades, and enough material on hand to burn few attempts, will most likely work ... but you may still be dissatisfied with the overall gap consistency from door to door on project involving other than just a one-off door and frame.
Obviously, and I'm not being condescending, you will want to do some practice runs and jig up for the job.
AAMOF, any jig/feature you can cobble up that will keep your jig saw running straight, true, and perpendicular (if that's what you want) to the surface will increase your chances of success immeasurably and may well be the key(s) to the kingdom.
Certainly worth a try to see what your equipment, and your jig making skills can accomplish ... who knows, there may never be anything other than a jig saw necessary to your future woodworking successes. :)
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Yes. (That's also the problem with plunging with a circular saw and finishing with a jigsaw.)
However, the multitool kerf should be smaller than the jigsaw, so that initial slot can be used as a guide for the jigsaw blade to plunge straight. It's like drilling a 1/16" hole before drilling a much larger hole.

I can start at the bottom and cut around. There's already a shelf installed, the cabinet frame will be built on top of that.
Since it's shop furniture, I always attempt to get the best quality cut but accept much less.

I can use the same aluminum guide for the jigsaw as I do the circular saw. Cutting curves would be a bit of an issue for a jig, but I'll probably freehand those.
There's only going to be 4 doors, so using anything more than the guide probably wouldn't be worth it.

I trust the saw to run straight and true, I've used it in the past and it's always done it. Any mistakes are my fault. Good tools are the first key to woodworking success. :-)
Puckdropper
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On 4/29/12 4:35 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

Multitool fine blade on both edges of the kerf.
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