Shed roof question

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I am going to build a storage shed. I've got more than enough plans and ideas but one.
I want to build a shed with a low pitched roof. I don't want a roof higher than about 15" +/- above the door. It will be either a 8x10 or 8x12 shed.
Is there a "common' aesthetic when it comes to roofs for sheds? I've seen many a plan where the roof is way above the door (it seems like wasted space to me) and others where there is barely a sense of a pitch.
The shed plan is a standard gable style.
Ideas? Thoughts?
MJ
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On 09/10/2009 12:35 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I built my gable-end shed roof with a 10/12 pitch. This gave me storage room above the rafters, which is accessible via a small opening in the gable. I use the rafter area for storing long lumber and my spare set of car wheels.
I think it boils down to whatever you like...as long as it's waterproof and strong enough to take any required loads (do you have snow?) you're golden.
Chris
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Chris speaketh the truth in the last paragraph, I think. I'd just add that it might make sense to take a gander at the roof of your house and consider possibly doing something similar, or at the very least harmonious. Not a hard and fast rule, of course, and maybe more a question of roofing materials than pitch.
I do wish my shed (that I did not build) had more roof overhang than it does. It would keep the siding material in better shape, and especially help prevent water from getting into the padlock and causing grief there. I also kind of wish there were a bit better ventilation; something like a soffit vent or ridge vent or gable vent is a good idea (screened, of course, to keep the critters on the correct side).
--
Andrew Erickson

"He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain that which he cannot
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On Thu, 10 Sep 2009 22:59:18 -0400, Andrew Erickson

My 10 X 10 has a 15 X 15 roof and a 10.5.5 -12? (40 degree? pitch with vented soffit and a full length ridge vent. The roof rafters are 10 footers. I have about 4 1/2 feet of height at the center of the "attic" and about 2 feet at the "knee wall" on the one side. The roof is offset, with about 4 feet overhang on one side and one end, and one foot on the other. Makes "dry" storage under the one end and a "porch" over the door.
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Andrew Erickson wrote:

Ever about every 4 to 6 month, I take the oil can to the shed and liberally oil the padlock. I squirting the oil into the workings of the lock, turning it over to insure the oil gets to everything in the lock.
The oil seems to prevent the water getting into the padlock working messing it up.
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Wouldn't it be a little easier just to use a weather proof or weather resistant lock?
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Upscale wrote:

Seriously; even the weather resistant/proof locks need a little help after hanging on the shed door for several years.
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On Fri, 11 Sep 2009 11:38:37 -0400, Keith Nuttle

Hang a flap of inner tube rubber over the lock. No problems.
Or do like I did - put a REAL door and lock kit on the shed, protected by overhang, just like the front door on the house. (even same key)
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Keith Nuttle wrote:

<snip>
Get a piece of scrap rubber (a piece of an old tire intertube will work) and attach it to the door covering the padlock.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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wrote:

If you roof with asphalt, that's about one square. Roof material is heavy enough you'll have a bit of a truss, not just 2x4s from ridge to wall, so that 15" sets the brace position (or less, if you want headroom). Steel roofing is self-supporting, but might cost more.
If you want it aesthetic, try to match other roofs nearby. In case of snow, steeper is better; in case of tree-droppings, steeper is better. My shed needs broom-and-hose treatment each fall.
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whit3rd wrote:

My next shed will have a gambrel roof. This gives more space for the small equipment and storage for other things.
The nice thing about the gambrel roof is it is easy to get into that storage space.
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8x12 lets you use full 4x8 sheets which makes life easier.
Lew
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Lew Hodgett wrote:

And for that matter, pitch the roof so it uses an even sheet or half sheet.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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How about building your shed 9-1/2' tall. For the exterior walls, if paneled, put a single 4X8 sheet at the top.... with its bottom edge beveled 30 degrees. Under that panel, put a 1X2" drip edge, which would be angled down 30 degrees. Under the drip edge, put a 1-1/2' tall panel. If the lower edge of the exterior wall ever rots, you only have to remove/repair the bottom section. That lower section and drip edge looks nice, also. That's what I did with my shop, using T1-11 siding.
Sonny
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There's only one rip, and no wasted wall sheathing, with an 8x10 shed. If that one rip is a deal breaker, I don't think the guy should be building a shed. ;)
R
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wrote:

There's only one rip, and no wasted wall sheathing, with an 8x10 shed. If that one rip is a deal breaker, I don't think the guy should be building a shed. ;)
Well.... you NEED a 5HP Saw Stop cabinet saw with 50" fence and a large outfeed table, and an Oneida cyclone dust collector for that task.... it could get expensive.
Using that as a reference point makes SWMBO feel a lot better about the 3 HP Jet cabinet saw and 1.5 HP 2-bag dust collector.... or the new Porter Cable circular saw. ;~)
John
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On 09/10/2009 12:57 PM, whit3rd wrote:

Not sure why you say you need a truss. There are lots of 8x12 sheds around here with just 2x4s from ridge to wall (and rafters to keep the sides from spreading out). Actually, my own shed doesn't even have a ridge board, the spacing is maintained by the sheathing.
Chris
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I was thinking he'd not want rafters unless they were over head- height, but a useful shed might have only 4' or 5' walls. Ergo, trusses. Nothing complicated, three or four sticks is enough.
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What ever you spend a few dollars more and go with use radiant barrier decking, silver side down. It "will" keep the shed and its contents cooler in the summer.
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Geeeez Translation,,
What ever you go with, spend a few extra dollars and go with radiant barrier decking, silver side down.
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