Shed Question

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I am getting ready to replace the wood doors on my shed. I am going with the same materials, except I am chainging the hinges.
I am replacing this style hinge (not exact match but close)... (Amazon.com product link shortened)12955567&sr=1-7&keywords=stanley+t+hinges
With this style hinge (looks like photo)... (Amazon.com product link shortened)12955492&sr=1-14&keywords=t+hinges
Instead of screwing the hinges in place, I plan to bolt them in place. Currently there are three hinges on each of the two doors, which brings up a question ... Can I go with two hinges or do I still need three per door?
Originally I was going to replace the enitre doorway with a double steel door/frame but the price of the door alone would triple the cost. Instead I opted to replace with same wood but lose some of the decorative cross members (water seeps in too much) and better hinges. I think once it is primed, painted and caulked, it should last longer than the originals, which have lasted 19 years.
I am also replacing the hasp and inner door bolt-lock with slightly heavier and longer galvanized versions. The original cheap bolt-lock was never really long or strong enough to keep the one door closed. Any other tips or suggestions welcome. I want this to last me at least another ten years and I think the rest of the shed can do that easily.
`Casper
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It depends. How big - and heavy - are the doors?
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On Friday, October 10, 2014 10:53:17 AM UTC-5, Casper wrote:

I'm supposing you are making/building your new (double?) doors & frame.
Any good quality hinge is recommended. You would need to gauge, for yourse lf, the weight of the doors, as to how many hinges would be best. Maybe, p ut two on, then if you find a third is necessary, add an additional, later.
As for as water entering the shed, build your framing as you would a home's entrance: Good sound door stops, a good heavy duty sloped threshold, mayb e some weather stripping, appropriately flash/seal the installation of the frame to the rough wall, etc. Caulk well under the threshold. Since, I su ppose, you are removing the old framing/threshold (maybe exposing the floor framing, under neath), make sure the floor joists/supports are up to par, solid, etc.... i.e., do a good inspection of the supports and flooring, whi le you're at it. Has any of that gotten wet, in the past, and may be needi ng some maintenance or additional support?
Sonny
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On 10/10/2014 1:25 PM, Sonny wrote:

I suspect it depends on how big the shed, and the size of the doors.
I have a 10 X 12' shed with 4X8 finished plywood panels on a 2 X 4 frame.
The doors were cut from the 4X8 panel and a 2X4 frame added to each door for re enforcement.
Each door is on a piano type hinge that runs the full length of the door.
The shed is three years old and the piano hinge is working well, and is doing the job.
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i have a 16x20 with the same hinge setup and had no issues for 20+ yrs I'd go with the piano hinge again
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On 10/10/2014 10:53 AM, Casper wrote:

Buy the extra heavy ones - looks like the pin in the hinge is sloppy. If it is a look alike and sloppy, then the door will sag or worse. (Amazon.com product link shortened)G8FST8RMWFFYTVMZD4
or (Amazon.com product link shortened)TRY2G4W5SV3N2VSG99
Spend the 15 or 20 on each and you will never look back.
Martin
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Yes. Exactly the same as what it has now. (Sizes below)

Currently it has three hinges per door of a lesser quality/strength than the gate hinge link I posted.

Not water into the shed, water pooling on the shed doors themselves. On the front cross pieces; decorative barn style ... typical 1x4 trim around entirety of both doors and one "X" on lower part of each door. The trim was never caulked and so the water runs along the panels and behind the trim, causing the trim and doors, to rot.
I'm not ripping up any flooring, or tearing apart the door framing. No need as all is in good shape. This is a standard kit shed, 10'x16', and it came with all the trimmings ninteen years ago.
Door space is are 5'11" wide and 7'1" tall. So 5'11"/2 gives 71" total, roughly 35.5" per door width. I figure, with better hinges and hasp, new wood panels and a few 2x4's, total cost will be about $100.
I want to replace the doors with minimal cost, within reason of keeping it around at least another ten years. Otherwise I can rent-to-own a new, bigger and better one in that time frame and not have any hands-on work to do myself. It includes a metal roof, windows, more vents, etc., all dropped on site pre-built.
Ultimately that would cost 5-6 times my repair cost but I already have three people who would buy my current shed and I would not would not have to do any work myself. I know it sounds lazy but I have been having major back, neck and hand issues this last year which are getting worse and I don't know how much longer I can continue to do jobs myself.
`Casper
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10'x16' ... double doors ... 5'11" wide x 7'1" tall total size. Roughly 35.5" width per door. Basic kit shed bought 19-20 yrs ago.

Sounds basically same as mine.

Exactly the same here.

Ours came with typical T-style hinges. Not uber cheap but not great. Three hinges per door.
I thought about piano hinges but was informed (here as matter of fact) that they are not great long term on outside sheds.

Our biggest problem with the doors has been the water behind trim causing rot and hinge screws coming out causing us to move hinges to keep door on and funtional. Bolting was recommended here and by others and that sounded like the longer lasting approach. `Casper
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I think a handful of people suggested piano hinges but most others recommended bolting in hinges saying it would work better and last longer. Since we've had to move the exsisting hinges three times to keep the doors on, I'm not sure how well that would work on this shed. `Casper
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On 10/12/2014 12:29 PM, Casper wrote:

Typically piano hinges are not suitable for out door weather. Tiny hinge pins can quick rust if the hinge is exposed to weather. they probably work well in some instances but are not really built for this purpose.
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The first one looks like what I found at Lowe's but 1/3 the price. The second is cheaper but if it's black, not sure that would fly. The Stanley hinges are also bearing, zinc plated and look stronger than that picture on Amazon shows. At least IMHO.
What I really would like to do but can't, at least not this year or next, is to add on to the shed. Want to add another 6-8 feet in length, separate that second section via wall, insulate and use a smaller single door. That would let me turn it into a small workshop that I can insulate and heat. I would then open up the wall on the other end and but either a very large single door (current doorway is 5'11" so somewhere between 4 and 5 feet) or a rollup door. The larger side would be used for storage as it is now. Right now I just need a door fix that will, if necessary, last for several years should I not be able to make the workshop happen. `Casper
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On Sunday, October 12, 2014 12:49:25 PM UTC-5, Casper wrote:

Wish I were nearby. I'd come help. I enjoy arguing with work mates, that kind of stuff. Yeah, we'd build an overhang over the doorway, keep that water away, then build and hang a porch swing, also.... some place to sit a nd think about next year's projects.
Sonny
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On 10/12/2014 01:57 PM, Sonny wrote:

I like the way you think, Sonny :-)
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On 10/12/2014 3:57 PM, Sonny wrote:

Just wondering here - Build an A frame of sorts - stout and strong - place it and attach it near the back wall. cut off the end of the house - and have a way to handle it and move it backwards. Then build the open ends together.
That or make the back wall an inner wall - and strip off most of the outer skin and support it such that it isn't a wall but an arch. Maybe you want a wall with a door there. Maybe not.
Might want a new king beam along the ridge or splice in.
Martin
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On Friday, October 10, 2014 8:53:17 AM UTC-7, Casper wrote:

The depicted hinge has two fingers /one finger interleave, so there's only ONE point of pressure holding weight. Typical exterior doors have three/two interleave, which means two points of pressure, and use three hinges.
Shed doors typically open outward, so the hinge will be out in weather, but otherwise the requirements are similar (take the same wind/weight loads). I'd think about upping the hinges to four from three, or using a different design. And, I'd try mortising the hinges into the frame (so one set of screws is protected from weather), even if the door connection is to be bolted-through-the-face.
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"Casper" wrote:

---------------------------------------------------------------- Plan B is a no brainer IMHO.
Not only do you pass the rebuild on to somebody else, but you get a new bigger shed.
Lew
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On 10/12/2014 4:49 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

While plan B sounds good, what will the bureaucrats be happy with it or will you need a couple of tons of permits, and buckets of money for the permits.
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Thankfully, no need for a permit where I live. All I need to do for a new one is show a photo of the completed unit to our HOA for approval. Since they approved the original without a blink, I suspect no real difficulty in same for a replacement. Only right now I'd prefer to use that money for other repairs, replacements and upgrades. /shrug
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I do like the way you think. I certainly like the swing idea!
Help around here is tough. Seems no one in the family but one does any DiY projects and right now he is working on his own deck and house in preparation for his first child. Ergo my plan B creation/backup. `Casper
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Interesting point but not sure additional hinges are really necessary. Current hinges are two/one interleave and three per door and it has stayed hung 99% straight all these years.

The current hinges are hardly rusted at all. It's just the darn door. It was never thought of to caulk the trim to prevent water seepage. I should have known better and I let it get away from me. Still the rest of the shed is in good condition except for a little on the bottom on the long sides. Splash up has done a litte damage but I should be able to repair that easily enough before repainting. Have thought about running a trim board there too but not sure it's worth it and that would also require caulking and be another potential water trap.
Even the hasp and lock show minimal signs of rust/age. I go out every year and clean them up a bit with WD40 and it seems to have helped in keeping things pretty clean and working smoothly. `Casper
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