Sharpening

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I have been using "Scary Sharpening" for my bench chisels and was considering moving to a stone system. Before I plunk down my cash, I have a few questions.
1) What do you use? Diamond, Ceramic, Oilstone, Waterstone 2) Why do you use it? 3) Just how much of a quality edge is to be gained from moving from Scary to a stone?
Thanks
Deb
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From what I have read on this newsgroup, I believe you want to stay with the Scary Sharp.
Mike in Ohio
On 12/10/2011 10:54 AM, Dr. Deb wrote:

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On Sat, 10 Dec 2011 11:01:03 -0500, Michael Kenefick

I use the powered version of "scary sharp", the WorkSharp 3000.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
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On 12/10/2011 9:54 AM, Dr. Deb wrote:

I tried them all and switched to a WorkSharp 3000 a couple of years back ... my chisel and plane blades have never been sharper, or easier to maintain an edge.
Effective as scary sharp and so much less of a mess than water stones (ugh ... nasty damn things!), or even oil stones.
I occasionally touch-up a chisel or plan blade with an Arkansas oil stone (but only as a touch-up after the blade has been sharpened and microbevel put on with the WS2000), just a matter of seconds, although a leather strop works just as well.
YMMV ...
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I am thoroughly dissatisfied with my sharpening thus far. I have been considering a WS3000, but you confused me - do you have a WS3000 or WS2000, which I think is a much less capable version than the WS3000?
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Han
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WS3000 . I also have a new Dell laptop, upon which I can not type without two mistakes+ per sentence; and an iPad, for which that goes double!
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wrote in

Just ordered a WS3000 at Amazon. Thanks for helping with that purchase <grin>. How's the Akeeda working out?
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Han
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On 12/10/2011 3:30 PM, Han wrote:

I've ordered some 8mm bits and guide bushings, cut and mounted it on a base and have it all setup and ready to go as soon as they arrive, just haven't had time to do anything other than other people's stuff. :)
I really do like the WS3000. You will go through all your tools, sharpen everything, then back it goes in the box until the next time ... no fuss, no muss.
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On Sat, 10 Dec 2011 15:18:09 -0600, Swingman wrote:

I remember reading somewhere that a problem with horizontal wheel grinders was that the edge didn't last as long because the scratches from the grinder were parallel to the edge instead of perpendicular. Thus the edge could flake off much easier.
I have no experience to either confirm or deny that theory, although it does seem to make some sense. But the effect may be so small as to be insignificant.
Have you noticed tools getting dull any quicker with the WS3000? Anyone else here able to confirm or deny from experience?
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That would mean the only area usable for sharpening was either the 6 or 12 o'clock position on the wheel. It was my impression that 3 o'clock was the position used. I will find out when it arrives ...

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Han
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On Sun, 11 Dec 2011 01:34:49 +0000, Han wrote:

Duh! The thought never crossed my mind. Maybe I should take up rocking chair sitting instead of ww :-).
But if the whole wheel is exposed, as it is on the WS3000, I suspect the natural tendency would be to use the nearest part.
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With narrow tools (chisels, narrow plane blades), you feed the blade bevel up through a guide against the _bottom_ of the horizontal disc.
In that case, the polishing pattern leaves slight swirls across the bevel, such that they are not quite perpendicular to the sharpened edge.
I certainly haven't notice that the edges are any weaker.
scott
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On 12/10/2011 7:02 PM, Larry Blanchard wrote:

Not in the least ... AAMOF, just the opposite.
Sounds like someone had an axe to grind. ;)
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Han, how do you sharpen your irons and why are you dissatisfied?
Have you read Leonard Lee's tome? It's a keeper, though I do several things a bit different than he suggests. http://goo.gl/uayi5
Have you read the original Steve LaMantia treatise on Scary?
Find a local woodcarver who can show you, physically, what "truly sharp" means. I didn't know that for far too many decades. A truly sharp iron will actually cut into your nail when rested upon it without any extra pressure. When you can sharpen an iron, rest it upon your fingernail, tap it on the flat side, and it resists moving, then raises a scraping, it's finally sharp. Anything less will skitter over the surface of the nail very easily.
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Larry, I've tried the scary sharp a bit and I have a set of expensive sharpton stones. I also have a combo oilstone gizmo, and 2 very small diamond honing plates (like 1x3"). I even went to an adult ed woodworking class, but that was a very nice bunch of guys ad gals each doing their own thing on the high school woodshop machines. No teaching of sharpening. Some of these techniques got me a better edge than there was originally, but either I haven't gotten the knack, or it is not for me. I do have trouble getting things under the same angle from stroke to stroke. I hope the WS3000 will help me get more consistency and will work easier and faster than those things. If the WS3000 works for me, maybe I can sell the sharpton stones to someone ...
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Han
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Uh, Shapton stones, right? Yeah, someone'll buy 'em. Sharpton is that Gnu Yawk bastard^H^H^H^H^Hptist minister who ran for Dem Pres in '04.
Have wifey get Lee's sharpening book for you for Xmas, eh?
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Probably <grin>. As much as I dislike Al Sharpton, there is no need for the language you used. Remember, I worked for some 35 years in New York City, the last couple of decades going through metal detectors at the NY VA at least once a day.
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Han
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On 12/10/2011 8:05 PM, Han wrote:

My bet is you are going to enjoy using it, you will sharpen every tool in your shop the first day, and most will be still be sharp, with just a bit of stropping, six month later.
I do not like to take the time to sharpen a tool (dislike it more than sanding) and therefore with all other methods I often let sharpening go much longer than was prudent. Since the WS3000 purchase, my tools have never consistently been this sharp for this long. I would not trade the WS3000 for all the Sharpton stones you could truck down here.
It simply works ... granted, basically all I've used it for is chisels and plane irons,and I've had to finish up a corner chisel by hand on the inside edges a time or two, but that would have been the case with other methods.
Like all tools, I sure there are some things it won't do, and someone will always find something lacking in any tool, but my highest accolade remains: I would buy it again if I lost it.
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Sounds like a machine tool sharpener is the way to go. Like you, I've never liked havning to put in the time to sharpen tools, but I do appreciate a tool when it's properly edged.
Now I'm considering buying a Tormek sharpener.
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Han, with your shapton stones, were you taught by the japanese wood worker guy?
If you were you can't miss. If not, I'll try to explain.
1st you need to have your bench lower than you think for freehand sharpening.
instead of rubbing the iron back and forth which can lead to you rocking the iron, you orient the iron so the width of the iron is parallel to the length of the stone. Then you press on the iron at the bevel and get the iron to its bevel. Now with your finger still holding pressure down at the bottom grab the blade with your remaining thumb and other hand and move the iron back and forth along it's width, This will give you a sharp edge. When you are done take a few swipes with the blade up a little higher for a micro bevel.
This works for me better than the width of the iron being oriented to the short side of the stone. I find this method to be so simple and tuneable. I would like to thank the guys at Japan Woodworking for teaching this method... I am just so amazed how simple it is to sharpen using this method, and how really sharp they get. No I don't have Shapton stones, I have natural water stones, and it still works.
On 12/10/2011 9:05 PM, Han wrote:

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