Seasonal Trees

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Sorta on topic, it's wood. Christmas is just around the corner, for some of us it's next month for the younger ones it's still about 2 months away. Anyway, as a kid in the 60's the magic of having the Christmas tree in the house was the smell. I learned some years back that the trees were being cut as early as late September and it seems that in the last 30 or so years the trees have lost their smell. For those of you that live in the northern U.S. and or Canada, do your trees get cut that early? Do they still have that smell?
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Here in CT, the local trees are often fresh cut when bought or a day or two before if you don't want to trudge the fields to find one. They have a nice smell. About a week before Thanksgiving though, I see trucks on the road heading south with loads of trees.
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I recall the tree filling the house with that smell. Now you can be in the middle of the Christmas tree lot have a hard time smelling the tree. You have to shake every tree to make sure it will make it home with some of its needles. Most are sprayed with a green dye.
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"Leon" wrote

Like anniversaries, every holiday should have a gemstone/metal/substance associated with it ... Christmas is plastic.
... and look out, it's almost Halloween. The ads start in about two weeks, with the blow up yard ornaments soon to follow.
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"Swingman" wrote:

Unfortunately, another holiday ruined by some creeps.
For the last 25 years, have not passed out anything edible at Halloween, but rather coins.
Too bad, candy was what I remember as a kid, not a coin.
Lew
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I am a bit confused. Are you saying that you give out coins instead of candy, and think that it is too bad that the kids don't get candy like you did as a kid?
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"Frank Drackman" wrote:

Yes, at least coins can't be laced with razor blades very easily and the kids get something they can safely keep.
Lew
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Why don't you give them candy without razor blades?
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I remember Coke in paper Coke cups, candy apples, popcorn balls and candy. It was rather magical by to days standards.
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"Leon" wrote:

Every year in Northern Ohio, got the tree out of the attic, stood it up, sprayed it with smelly and got a beer.
Done for another year.
Lew
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DAMN! that sounds like a wonderful childhood memory. LOL We started doing that a few years back and last year did not even put up a tree. It's not Christmas with out the smell.
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On Sat, 13 Oct 2007 13:29:52 GMT, "Leon"

We're passing on a tree this year, as we have two 6 month old kittens.
I'll thickness plane some pine in my basement shop for the smell.
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Here in Oregon they shipped about 8 million trees last year. The growers I've talked to say they harvest and ship to Asia in mid to late Oct. Mexico gets shipped to next, followed by the eastern US. The last shipments go out by the 2nd week in Dec. As for the smell ours are quite aromatic. But then again we cut our own and it's in the house the same day.
Art

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We have Tree farms near Houston that you can go and cut your own tree, but I guess because of the warmer climate the type tree that we get locally has very little aroma to it.
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I guess it may depend on what part of the country you live in, but regardless there is one sure fire way to tell - go to the lots that sell Christmas trees and see if you find that smell.
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The lots have that faint smell. I think the trees that we get now are all dried out by the time we get them,.
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We make a holiday of it. Several families show up for breakfast at our house, where I make sausage, bacon, eggs, and homemade cinnamon buns. Then we go to a tree farm, and search for the perfect tree. My wife likes to find a tree with a bird nest. "If it's good enough for a bird, it's good enough for our house." After getting the tree bagged and tagged, we go to the nearby pub and drink several pints of draft brews, and have a pub lunch. Then the families separate and retire to their house.
The trees smell great, and lasts for months without losing needles.
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Where's the bird gonna live? <G>
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writes:

We have local tree farms, we go out and find the perfect tree, try to find one "with out" a wasp's nest, take it to the machine that shakes the dead needles off and bags it, load it up, take it home, take a shower to wash the sweat off.

THOSE are the trees I remember. After Christmas we kids would gather all the trees in the neighborhood that had been put out for trash pick up and take them into the woods and build forts. The smell in the forts was wonderful. ;~)
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On Sat, 13 Oct 2007 01:29:37 GMT, "Leon"

For a number of years, in Northeast Mississippi, I had been getting my Christmas tree from a local tree farm. After Thanksgiving, ride the wagon out to the field, select and tag your tree, cut it and bring it home later. So it was fresh and certainly had the smell.
Last year we got a card in the mail stating the the owner of the tree farm had advanced stage cancer and that they were shutting down their operation. Sad.
Man was a retired dairy farmer converted to Christmas tree farming. My wifes uncle in Georgia did the same thing. I asked him once why the shift from dairy farming to Christmas tree farming after all those years. He said, " well Frank, those Christmas trees don't care what time you get up in the morning"
Frank
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