Ryobi cordless 18v circular saw

Just saw one at HD for $79 with battery and charger. Are these decent to have around the house, and is this a good price?? Thanks.
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I use mine all the time. Of course it is too feeble for more than a few 2x4s or an occasional cut plywood cut, but I do that frequently and it is much easier than pulling out a corded saw.
One battery? You can do better on Ebay, especially if you don't need the charger. Of course, there is no risk at HD.
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The battery will dies on you after 12 to 18 months. If that is OK ($50) it is a handy saw to h ave.
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HD currently has the Ryobi 18V batteries, two for 39.97.
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I purchased an 18V Ryobi drill/driver a year or so ago. I'm not impressed, the batteries just don't seem to hold their charge very long. The 10 year old 12V Ryobi that I replaced with it would run 10 times longer on a charge. Sears has their corded 7 1/2 in circular (professional, 28060) laser track saw on sale now for $89. I purchased one about a week ago. I've only used it once but am in love with it. Rob Mills ~
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ranted:

I got the 14.4v drill and saw combo with two batteries, case, and charger for $99. You'll only get about 5 minutes work out of each battery for the circular saw, but it cuts nicely and is easy to use. Figure on replacing batteries at 2 years. That's when mine started dying. I picked up an Ebay replacement pack for $25 + $10 s/h and it's full power again.
I love the drill, complete with 2 levels, and use it weekly if not daily.
All told, I'd do it again.
-------------------------------------- PESSIMIST: An optimist with experience -------------------------------------------- www.diversify.com - Web Database Development
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I just got rid of my Ryobi cordless saw and bought a Milwaukee cordless. The reason I got rid of the Ryobi is that it was very underpowered and could not cut a full sheet of 3/4 plywood without at least two battery changes. Ditto for the Ryobi recip saw, limited run times vs battery charges. I guess the Ryobi stuff is ok for the very occasional user but when you are in the middle of a project and have to wait for a new battery charge, it just plain gets frustrating. BTW, no problems with the Milwaukee saws with their 2.4AH batteries.
Mike

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It's junk. Won't last through more than a single cut on a sheet of plywood or a few 2x4's. Move up to a Milwaukee. Mine goes and goes like the Energizer bunny.
Bob

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I paid $89 about a year and a half ago. I would have been ahead of the game if I'd just thrown the cash into the paper shredder. The saw itself does hold attraction via price and mobility but it's total battery hog -- and that makes it next to worthless (except as an awkwardly-sized paper weight). Even with a better blade than the stock one installed, it would take two fully-charged batteries to rip just 8-feet of 3/4" borg-quality plywood.
-- Steve www.ApacheTrail.com/ww/
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Sounds like my 18V Ryobi drill, you just get started on a project and it's time to swap batteries again. My old 12V one would go pretty steady for best part of a day. I don't know what Roybi did or didn't do but they are signing their own death warrant by putting out merchandise like that. RM ~
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For around the house, buy a corded model. For out in the middle of nowhere with no electrical service around it will get you out of a bind.
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You've got it, don't believe I'll buy another battery operated tool. The folks at Ryobi have cured me. RM ~
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I never thought much of battery operated anything as far as tools go except for drills. Drills tend to work well and long when battery operated. It has been documented that higher voltage battery operated tools tend to not last as long as lower voltage units, all things being equal. Heat being the enemy of any battery tends to build more and last longer in battery packs with more cells.
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I still have my old (10 + years) 12V Ryobi and one battery that still works and still holds a charge much better than the new 18V one and even has more torque.
My pride and joy is an aprox 15-20 year old Black and Decker corded professional 3/8 drill/driver that retailed at over $200 when new. It has manual 2 speed gear change (with real metal gears) and is variable speed. It will bury a screw in anything or break it off. RM ~
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I bought one of those 18 volt Ryobi combo packs (Drill, Circular saw, Recripocating saw) and have used it extensively for three years. If you plan to infrequent cuts of small amount the convenience is great. For larger projects, the corded saw is necessary.
My Ryobi batteries have done better than the Makita that I owned previously.
Dick

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