Routers with ability to adjust centering


Despite making my own base for my Bosch 1613, I still have issues with not being able to get the bit centered within a template. For those of you who do lots of template routing, what router would you recommed that allows one to precisely adjust the centering of the bit?
Thanks for any information and/or experiences.
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I have two PCs, a 690 and a 8529. Both have Pat Warner bases on them and they line up very well. The 690 did fine with the stock base. The 8529 did fine with the stock base and template adapter as far as centering but the hole in it is 3 1/2". Makes it pretty useless for any time you get close to an edge. If your Bosch uses countersunk screws to hold the plate on, that may be the problem. Replace them with flat heads in counterbored holes. Make the through holes a bit oversize. With that setup, you should be able to center the bushing hole and when you tighten the screws, they won't pull it out of alignment. This won't help if your bit is not square to the base however.

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The Bosch 1617 has an adjustable base plate for centering the bit.
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On Sat, 06 May 2006 21:33:08 -0700, Mark & Juanita wrote:

If at all possible, I use a bit with a bearing instead of a template collar.
There are times when only a template collar will do. In those cases, make sure you hold the router in the same orientation at all times with respect to the template. You will also need to fiddle with template position (or size) to compensate for the bit not being centered.
I have two Bosch 1617s, the template collar holder does allow some adjustment. But I've little confidence in it staying put. I check often.
I bought Pat Warner's base with cutout for the PC style template collars. These have no "slop", but they're held on with flat-head machine screws, so there's no way to adjust them, either. With one of my plunge bases, its off a little. The other appears to be dead on.
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Art


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wrote:

Thanks to all for the answers provided thus far.

Yep

While I attempt to do this, there are some times where this is either impractical or not possible given the directions one needs to turn.

... and that's the part I'm getting somewhat tired of needed to do.

Would prefer something that once in place, stays in place, but right now, I'd dearly love the ability to do some sort of adjustment.
... snip
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Mark & Juanita wrote:

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+--------------------------------------------------------------------------------+I use porter cables just for the reason. I was given a dewalt for Christmas one time just to be setup for my dovetail jig. I put the bit in and could see the base was WAY off. Tried to center the base but it has some sort of pins holding it in place. It went back several days later and I came home with a PC690. I also had a 1/4" SS rod milled. On setup I chuck it up with the template that fits it snug. Then with the screws lose the sub base will center on it's own. Then just tighten the screws. Remove the rod and template and replace with the one you want to use.
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I take advantage of the 'off-centre' bit. I do the cut with it running shy...then rotate the router 180-degrees and climb-cut on the way back. I also have a (once) square base which is 1/32 out on 3 sides: Side A = 0 Side B = + 1/32 Side C = + 1/16 Side D = + 3/32 Clearly marked, it allows for a very fine 'sneaking' up to a marked line. It only works on a straight cut, of course, mostly trimming 1-1/2" thick edges in solid surface. 1/32 is 'fine' in the world of solid surface counter top fabrication.
r
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On Sat, 06 May 2006 21:33:08 -0700, Mark & Juanita

1) Cut out a new baseplate blank that's about 1/16" larger than what you want to end up with. I've used a teardrop shape that takes an outboard handle made on the lathe. 2) Cut the head off a 1" or so screw that's the same thread size as the baseplate mounting screws for your router. 3) Chuck the resulting threaded rod into your drill press; don't tighten so much that you damage the threads. 4) With the DP running, use a file to form a sharp point on the rod. When finished, cut a slot into the opposite end of the rod so you can use a small screwdriver to turn it. 5) Clamp the baseplate blank (roughly centered) to the cast base of the router so it can't move. 6) From the top of the cast base, screw the rod down through so that it dimples the baseplate at exactly the center of each of the mounting screw locations. 7) Unclamp the baseplate blank, and using a brad point bit in the drill press, drill out the mounting hole locations. Countersink (FROM THE BOTTOM) for flat-head screws. 8) Chuck up a "vee" bit in the router with the tip just below the plane of the casting surface where the baseplate mounts. Screw the new baseplate onto the casting, using flathead screws. 9) Using the router's height adjustment, jam the vee bit down into the baseplate a bit, and turn the router collet by hand to creat a dimple that indicates the exact center of the router's shaft. 10) Unscrew the baseplate from the router base, and drill all the way through the baseplate center point with a 1/16" bit. 11) Using a Forstner bit (I think the correct size is 1-3/16"), bore part way through from the BOTTOM of the plate to form the OUTER diameter counterbore for your template collar's mounting flange. The 1/16" hole provides the centering point for the Forstner bit. The depth of the counterbore you're making is that of your collar's mounting flange plus 10 or 20 thousandths more that will get the collar below the bottom plane of the baseplate. 12) Again, using a slightly larger Forstner bit and the 1/16" hole for a center, counterbore from the TOP of the plate to provide clearance for the threaded locking ring for the template collar. The reason for this is if you're using a 3/8" thick baseplate, there's not enough collar thread showing above the top of the plate for adequate mating with the collar lock ring unless you provide a counterbore. 13) Using one more Forstner bit and the 1/16" centering hole, drill out a clearance hole to allow the template collar to pass through the baseplate. You should have a hole with stepped counterbores at top and bottom of the baseplate that allow the template collar to mount and lock into the plate. 14) With a collar mounted, screw the new baseplate to the router casting with flat head screws. The collar should be dead center on the axis of the router's shaft. 15) In a 12" or so square piece of plywood or (ugghh) MDF, drill a hole that will accept the template collar with a tight fit, but allow the router to spin. Place the hole in the board such that the edge of the router and baseplate hang off the edge a bit. 16) Chuck a sanding drum into the drill press, and clamp the board with the router onto the table so that the sanding drum will hit the edge. Sand the edge of the baseplate while slowly spinning the router around to form an edge that's absolutely concentric with the center of the baseplate, the template collar, and the router shaft. Obviously with a teardrop shaped plate you don't want to spin 360 degrees, but you can turn it the appropriate angle to smoothly meet the straight sides at a tangent. Several passes with the sanding drum will get the base down to the desired radius.
The last couple of bases I've done this way have all been within 3 thousandths (0.003) of an inch of concentric to the router shaft, both to the collar and to the edge of the baseplate. I've been using the machined brass type of collars; you might have to modify this procedure somewhat to accommodate the stamped steel collars.
Cliff Ober
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