router and raised panels ?s


1.Should a fixed base or plunge router be used for raised panels? 2. I bought a cheap Chinese 3 1/4hp plunge router and the bits do not spin perfectly true, you can see a slight wobble in the Allen bolt holding the bearing on. It is not supposed to be like this right? I assume it should spin true. 3. How many hp is required for a 2 3/4" raised panel bit and approx. what speed. Thanks
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Never hand-hold a router for raised panel work; use only a router table.
There should be NO noticeable wobble.
Speed around 14-16k
Dave
habbi wrote:

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Actually, shoot for 12-14K. You'll still get a smooth cut at those speeds. Make at least two passes if you expect tearout.
Dave
David wrote:

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You're kidding, right? Router table only.

You're kidding, right? It it doesn't spin perfectly true, it is not good for much of anything.

My router is 2hp. I have done exactly one raised panel because it took me about 8 passes with a new bit. I set the speed as low it it would go. Maybe it would have worked better a bit faster?
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I'll try not to ask a newbie question of you, toller! I shudder to ask potentially foolish questions for fear of being called a fool. We new guys *need* your experience without the, "You're kidding, right?" kind of commentary. No offense intended - we just need help without the jab to the ego. Later, Chiz

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wrote:

Well, your second question actually *was* just a wee bit foolish, if you don't mind my saying so, and although I usually don't agree with much of what he says, I gotta tell ya, toller's answer is right on the money: if it doesn't spin true, it's not good for much of anything. Take it back to the retailer and demand a refund. Then buy something decent. Life's too short to buy crappy tools.
As for your other questions, it doesn't much matter whether you use a plunge or fixed-base router for panel cutting, as long as you have it securely mounted in a router table. DON'T attempt to cut raised panels while hand-holding the router. That's dangerous, big time.
I don't think the horsepower really matters much. The stronger the router, the more wood you can take off in one pass, up to a point. For speed settings, consult the manufacturer's recommendations, and experiment on scrap.

Maybe.. but it *definitely* would've worked better with a shaper than a router. <g>
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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It doesn't matter much one way or another. Anyone who doesn't have the common sense to know that conspicuous runout makes a router useless won't be around too long anyhow. Or more likely, he is a troll, as no one could really be that dumb. Get it now?
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One could say that "anyone who doesn't have the common sense to know" that the lack of either guard or splitter on his table saw just might have had a teeny tiny bit to do with the serious kickback he just experienced "won't be around too long anyhow. Or more likely, he is a troll, as no one could really be that dumb."
One could also say that "anyone who doesn't have the common sense to know" that miswiring duplex breakers, or connecting equipment grounds to circuit neutrals, is dangerous "won't be around too long anyhow. Or more likely, he is a troll, as no one could really be that dumb."
But more than a year later... you're still here.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Of course I am going to mount it in a table, I am just wondering which type to mount. Is a fixed base more rigid and easier to finely adjust the height?

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I use a PRL router lift with a 7518. I wouldn't think of mounting my other Porter Cable plunge router. That would be a royal PITA!
Don't get a Craftsman "random height adjustment" router! :) I had one of those for a short time. It was a present that I returned to Sears for a refund. I then hauled my butt to the local PC dealer and got a "real" router.
My 7518 is a fixed type. The mounting plate takes care of the height, using gears and a chain. There are other competing models, such as the Jointech. Be prepared to cough up some serious cash for either brand. I just couldn't make to with my cheesy Sears metal router table with my plunge router. It was too small, too noisy, too messy (no dust collection chamber) too hard to set the height, too flimsy, and it just didn't float my boat. <g> If I'm gonna have a hobby like woodworking, I've got to enjoy my time in the shop. Thankfully, SWMBO FULLY supports my expenditures on whatever I need. Thank the Lord!
If your means are limited, I'll just sit back and let someone else take over with suggestions for "simpler" methods of putting a decent router table/router/router plate or lift together. (I'm not up on the various alternatives.)
Dave
habbi wrote:

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Depends on the brand of router. Greg
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Most tables are fitted with fixed base routers. Thee will always be an exception.
If you are buying a new router, consider the combo kits that have two or three bases. You can mount the fixed in the table and have the plunge and D handle base for other work.
It the budget will handle it, you can buy a router lift for a table. No base is needed, just the router motor. Big advantage is ability to adjust accurately from above the table. www.benchdog.com to see one type.
--
Ed
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome/



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1. Either, but mount it in a table.
2. It may be just the screw that is off center, does the bearing run out too?
3. Lots! A cheap router may not be up to the task. I have a Porter Cable 7539, and take three passes in oak with a 3-1/2" raised panel bit, on slow speed, 10,000 RPM. Greg
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