Rockler FX router lift

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Any of you folks have this lift:
http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page !380&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term=&utm_content=pla&utm_campaign=PLA&gclid=CK6n6trvmrcCFRJp7AodwxgAbA
Seems like a decent price for a lift when compared to others that are roughly twice as much. Looking to avoid the penny-wiuse, pound-foolish syndrome if this lift is a dog.
Larry
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On Thursday, May 16, 2013 7:55:23 AM UTC-7, Gramp's shop wrote:

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me if this lift is a dog.

Not familiar personally but looking at the screw drive it seems they avoid one problem of some lifts. They use fairly coarse threads for the elevation rod. Some systems use very fine threads (ie Incra), I suppose to support f ine adjustment but fine threads get easily fouled with sawdust. I've learne d over the years, those with coarser threads don't seem to have this issue.
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On 5/16/2013 7:55 AM, Gramp's shop wrote:

http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page !380&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term=&utm_content=pla&utm_campaign=PLA&gclid=CK6n6trvmrcCFRJp7AodwxgAbA

twice as much. Looking to avoid the penny-wiuse, pound-foolish syndrome if this lift is a dog.

I have the Jessem but that the Rockler version looks pretty good but notice that it only supports limited set of "smaller" routers not the big 3HP production routers. If you can live with that, it looks to be fine.
It will depend on what you have and where you want to be.
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On 5/16/2013 1:39 PM, Pat Barber wrote:

http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page !380&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term=&utm_content=pla&utm_campaign=PLA&gclid=CK6n6trvmrcCFRJp7AodwxgAbA

I got the Rockler lift about a month ago - haven't used it a lot yet, but so far it works quite well. I have the PC 690, which fits very nicely.
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On Thursday, May 16, 2013 5:19:30 PM UTC-5, Matt wrote:

n6trvmrcCFRJp7AodwxgAbA

I decided to go for it as my existing table router is a PC690. Of course, the plate is smaller than my existing plate ... so I need build a new top. The last one was melamine over 3/4 MDF available on the cheap from Menards . I took a peek at Woodcraft for the phenolic plywood, but that's $60 or a bout 10x what I'd pay for the MDF. Any reason to go the extra mile? Also, won't feel too bad about mucking up the MDF when I rout an insert for the plate. I'm shooting for a nice tight fit this time.
Larry
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On 5/16/2013 6:32 PM, Gramp's shop wrote:

plate is smaller than my existing plate ... so I need build a new top. The last one was melamine over 3/4 MDF available on the cheap from Menards. I took a peek at Woodcraft for the phenolic plywood, but that's $60 or about 10x what I'd pay for the MDF. Any reason to go the extra mile? Also, won't feel too bad about mucking up the MDF when I rout an insert for the plate. I'm shooting for a nice tight fit this time.

get 2 pieces of mdf from the shorts at HD. get a piece of formica, glue put the two pieces together, then skin with formica on both sides you'll have a nice stout table top.
I personally would not put a slot for a miter gauge I never use it. I just use the fence and a squared piece of wood to back it up... or a jig to hold for raised panels...
my opinion... not necessary, but as long as you are going for a lift make it sturdy.
--
Jeff

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On 5/16/2013 6:20 PM, woodchucker wrote:

The slot Is not necessarily for a miter gauge, I use it to anchor feather boards when running narrow stock through.
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"Gramp's shop" wrote: I decided to go for it as my existing table router is a PC690. ------------------------------------------------------- As long as you can live with a 1" bit dia. limitation, you are good to go.
Lew
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On 5/16/2013 8:15 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

it's got a 1.5 ring.. but you can go sans the ring, or buy another and open it up.. I didn't see a 1" limitation.
--
Jeff

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"woodchucker" wrote:

Bit RPM.
The 690 operates about 22-25,000 RPM.
Once the bit gets bigger than a 1/2" cove/roundover, the bit mfg starts limiting the bit RPM to about 12,000, maybe less.
The 3 HP routers can go a low as about 8,000 RPM which allows use of those 3" dia. panel bits.
Lew
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On 5/16/2013 9:23 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

I understand, but it's not a limitation of the lift. You have a wierd way of beating around the bush...
--
Jeff

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I'm considering using this set up for panel-raising operations. While I recognize the speed issues using a PC690, I seem to recall that there are speed reducers available, oui?
Larry
On Thursday, May 16, 2013 8:23:40 PM UTC-5, Lew Hodgett wrote:

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"Gramp's shop" wrote:

You can probably find a speed control; however, consider the following:
The output torque of a universal motor is directly proportional to operating RPM.
If you are able to reduce the RPM of a PC690, you will also reduce it's cutting torque.
Translation:
Taking even the shallowest cuts with a large bit and a PC690 at 8,000 RPM will result in burn cuts, especially in you are working with Maple.
The same rules apply to a larger router such as a Milwaukee 5625; however, you are starting with a much bigger HP motor, so you will still have enough torque to get a clean cut, even at the 8,000 RPM level.
If you truly want to use large bits in a table mounted router, you probably want to start thinking about a larger table mounted router as well as the lift.
Lew
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On Thu, 16 May 2013 21:56:06 -0700, "Lew Hodgett"

I certainly agree. Consider that using panel, rail and stile type router bits are one of the biggest motivators for setting up a table mounted router.
All I'd suggest is that he takes a moment to consider before going out to purchase this particular router lift.
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On 5/17/2013 12:56 AM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

I just use tempered hardboard spacers on the fence to take smaller cuts. I pull one off and go again... simple and fast.
Larry you can pick up a speed controller yes.. I picked up one from HF years ago for 9.99 on sale..
I had a Craftsman router probably 40-50 years old without speed control. works great.
my 1617evs both of them are variable speed and have good torque.
--
Jeff

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On Friday, May 17, 2013 11:12:48 AM UTC-5, woodchucker wrote:

Thanks, guys. I also have a variable speed Dewalt that I believe will fit this lift.
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On Fri, 17 May 2013 20:34:34 -0700 (PDT), "Gramp's shop"

The problem I have with table mounting variable speed routers is that it's usually impossible to adjust the speed once it's under the table. They're made to be operated by hand with little thought of table mounting. I prefer to have a dedicated router for the table(s) and if variable speed is needed, build the controller into the table, too. If you're sinking that much money into a table, might just go all-in.
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Simple solution.. Do you have a cell phone with a camera? Take a picture of the speed dial and adjust accordingly. I used to use a mirror. :-)
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I have a bosch, I don't find it a problem getting to the dial. Certain units may have a problem, but I think that depends on the unit.
--
Jeff

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wrote:

I haven't found any that can be accessed easily from the underside of a table. ..and that goes for the switches, too. If I put it in a table, it's dedicated, with the controls on the outside of the box. On my latest table, even the collet nut is accessible above the table top. ;-) I'm not a contortionist. ;-)
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