Ridgid TS2650 inserts

Recently upgraded to a Home Depot Ridgid TS3650 contractor table saw. I'm having all kinds of problems acquiring zero clearance and dado/molding inserts. I've been working with ridgidparts.com and have yet been able to acquire the correct parts. You'd think this wouldn't be such a pain, but it has. 1. Is there an alternative place to order zero clearance inserts, for this particular saw? 2. What tools are required to build your own inserts? I presume that a planar/jointer would be required to acquire the correct depth. I'd hate to go this route because of physical space concerns. 3. Perhaps I could order a compatible insert, for a competing saw, if I knew that one existed. Thanks, Dave
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On Saturday 29 Jan 2005 4:24 pm, dave scribbled:
<snip>

As I pointed out in: http://www.google.ca/groups?q=g:thl3642737667d&dq=&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&selm=upgpvv4g3eip1mcp0ak6sfmurdh68203ag%404ax.com

You can make the rough cut with a bandsaw, jig saw, scroll saw, coping saw, keyhole saw, rasp, your teeth, etc.. I would even say freehand on the table saw, but Doug is likely to jump all over me for promoting unsafe work practices.
To hold the template to the new insert for routing it, use double sided (carpet) tape.
To make the zero clearance cut, raise the blade into it after clamping it down to the table. I use the fence, but others clamp a 2X4 or other appropriately-sized piece of wood.
If the blade (at its lowest position) is too high for the insert to sit flush (not likely with a dado blade) so you can safely make the cut, you have three options:
(1) Use a smaller blade to start the cut, (2) route a slot on the underside, or (3) as suggested by WoodButcher in a thread back in May 2003 (quoting from his post):

--
Luigi
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All you need, really, is a router with a template bit and some good plywood, such as 1/2" baltic birch. You can even use MDF. Forget about any planer/jointer requirements and use sunken allen head set screws to set the depth. Just cut a blank slightly oversize, attach to your existing insert with double-faced carpet tape, and use the template bit to make an exact copy. If 1/2" is too thick you can rout a rabbet on the underside.
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My dad and I both have Ridgid table saws and I ordered several inserts before the shortage started when they changed colors. He couldn't get any from them and I gave him one of my mine. He insisted on replacing mine and bought me a "Premium Zero Clearance" (nice solid UHMW with levelers) at a woodshow form these guys: http://www.ttrackusa.com/zeroclearanceinserts.htm You want #436 for a TS3650.
I have since made about a half dozen from 1/2" birch ply. I just cut the length and width, traced an outline of the corner radius and disc sanded the corners down to a tight fit, and routed the lip all the way around with a straight bit on the router table to make it sit flush with the table top. Drilled a finger hole to get it back out. Johnson's paste wax finish. I think it took me about 30 minutes to make $80 dollars worth on a saturday morning.
I posted a few pictures over in alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking showing my recent run-in with Apitong, and one of the shots shows an insert with built in splitter.
Kevin in Bakersfield
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