Repairing TS power cord

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I'm a paranoid stickler for unplugging my table saw whenever I'm not using it (on its mobile base in the driveway), changing blade height or angle, taking a phone call, etc. As a result, the power cord on my saw probably takes a lot more abuse than most people's. The other day I unplugged it while I had to go inside the house for a few minutes. When I pulled the end out of the outlet, it left the grounding plug in the outlet! I was able to extract it, but now my power cord is minus its grounding prong. Two questions: should I be very concerned about this, and where do I look in the yellow pages for a place to repair the cord on an induction motor? Thanks.
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Assuming for the moment you are serious... Its not a big deal, but a new plug costs about $5. Cut the old one off, strip the wires, and stick the new one on. If you need to hire some to do it, you should not be using a table saw.
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That might be harsh. Woodworking doesn't really have much to do with electriity.
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It might have been a little critical, but I'd have to agree. Looking at the old plug would give enough information to wire a new one. The safe operation of a tablesaw is infinitely more difficult than the wiring of a power plug.

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Yea I see you'r point in a way, but some folks just dont "do electric" No Way/Shape or Form :>) Tony

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And I see your point too. I've got a friend that goes hang gliding and skydiving, but he cringes with fear every time his tablesaw gets turned on. Don't why he bought the thing in the first place. It only gets used when I go over there and use it myself.

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Well, *no*wonder* he cringes with fear -- *YOU'RE* using it!!
*snicker*
[ You leave the door open _that_ wide, and somebody *is* going to drive the truck through it. ;) ]
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Sorry Robert, but your career as a comic isn't doing too well. Hope you haven't given up your day job. :)
wrote:

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You can just buy a heavy duty plug at the borg. Buy a nice one and it should last forever. Be sure you get the black wire on the brass screw. White goes to the silver screw and the green is the ground.
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Greg wrote:

i.e.
Black on brass White on brite Ground on green
Simple little way to remember.
HTH,
nuk
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Thanks for the "white on brite" ... i always get those confused...

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LEFTY- LUCY RIGHTY-TIGHTY TOM :)
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Ian Dodd wrote:

Ummm... yes, you should be concerned about it. The ground prong is there for safety reasons. Now, the world's not going to end if you don't have it, but it is there to protect you should something accidentally ground out inside the saw. Hopefully the electricity will take the easiest path back to ground via the ground wire, instead of thru you.
As far as calling someone to replace it... ye gads man, are you telling me you've never replaced a plug on an extension cord in your life? Snip off the existing plug an inch or so back, take it to the hardware store, and get one that matches. Some even come w/ directions in the box. Usually they are a little bulkier and aren't as pretty, but they work fine, all day long. If you really need help with it, I'd say call an electrician, or even a handyman service, and explain that you've never done it before, and need someone to do it for you and hopefully have them show you how. About a 5-10 minute job, and if they charge by the hour... ouch. Better safe than sorry, though, I guess.
HTH,
nuk
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nuk wrote:

As a practical matter, if the person is worried about the plug, one can get a cord with a molded plug and just replace the whole cord.
One problem, especially working with 12 gage stranded wire, is how do you put the stuff under screws without cutting some of the strands. I would tin the stripped length lightly and then bend it, but you aren't suppose to put soldered (which is tinned) wire under a screw as it compress and eventually loosens. Do people use brass or copper sleeves compressed on the strands. I suppose you could use a spade compression fitting. It isn't a problem in some plugs, like I just bought, but it is a problem with wiring outlets.
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The better plugs use a captive washer and plate that clamps the wire instead of just runing it under a screw.
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It usually isn't the plug that is the problem it is the receptacle which normally doesn't have a screwhead large enough to handle 12 g stranded wire.
Greg wrote:

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You're kidding. By a plug for 2.48 or a better plug for 2.79 from Home Depot. Cut the old plug off and put the new on. I agree with Toller, if you can't do that you have no business operating a table saw.
Ian Dodd wrote:

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Well I agree it's easy to change a plug, I don't think that means you can't operate a table saw. Tony D.
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Anthony Diodati wrote:

You have it backwards from what we said! If it is so easy to change a plug and you can't do it, how would you do something more difficult like adjusting a saw, aligning the fence, etc.?
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On 1 Jan 2004 19:55:29 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (Ian Dodd) wrote:

Yes! All you need is a new plug. Take your old one to HD or any hardware store for a replacement plug (no need to replace the cord unless it is damaged or worn) It's really cheap and easy to do.
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