Repairing split timber

Hi. I have just cut some 24mm thick oak treads to a length but there are 3 or 4 lengths where the last inch or so have an end split/shake. Most of the split will of course be hidden by the string. But should I do something to stabilize or repair these imperfections? And how should I do it?
Thanks.
Arthur
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Is this fully seasoned, joinery-grade oak? (i.e. is more movement expected, or are they fully stable).
If fully stable, I'd work with it as it is, and use stoppings (e.g. Brummer) once the stair is complete.
If you think the crack is likely to propagate, you could glue in a biscuit(s) into the hidden board edge to act as a "tie" (trim off excess).
BTW - what width/depth are these stair treads? Is there an opportunity to further stiffen them with a centre carriage and/or battens glued to the underside?
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Thanks. The biscuit idea sound very good. The oak has been dried but I can't be sure to what extent so I'm taking a chance with it. It is 24mm thick at the moment but there are some patches that are rough sawn so it I may have to plane it down and then give it some heavy sanding to get a good finish. I suppose I should feed them all through a thicknesser and reduce them all to 22mm or 21m to end up with a really fine finish (to the treads anyway). But I don't want to reduce the thickness if its not totally necessary.
Arthur
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Arthur2 wrote:

IME once oak has split, nothing short of a permanent iron band will close up the gap permanently.
Either cut off split sections, or simply fill with plastic wood to match the stain/varnish color you are applying. In practice, it looks far better to match the darkest knot colour than the lightest wood, so I use a fairly deep brown plastic wood.

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You are confusing me, you don't want to reduce the thickness to get a good surface but are willing to do some heavy duty sanding to eliminate rough areas. A thickness planer will reduce the thickness evenly and accurately, sanding will create dips, uneven thicknesses and a poor result.
24mm is really too thin for treads, it is less than an inch. Once you have cleaned up the rough surface, by any means, you still will have even less thickness, you will be down to about 7/8". You need to rethink this job, maybe glue a strip of wood to build up the front edge, and add a center support.
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Arthur,
Unless these are boxed stairs or you have a center support under each tread - 24mm is not really thick enough for a stair tread.
As for the end splits - you could drill a small hole all the way through at the end of the split to stop it and fill that in with an epoxy. Use a colorant such as artists acrylic paints mixed with the epoxy to either blend it in or make a contrast. If the splits are long enough, you could inlay a butterfly that spans the split to add a bit of a decorative touch.
For now though, I would suggest you research what the minimum tread thickness should be for the type of stairs you're building and that you meet and/or exceed code.
http://www.extremehowto.com/xh/article.asp?article_id `182
Bob S.
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The splits only extend about an inch in from the end of the treads and although visible will be mainly hidden within the string. I will be routing a closed stringer from at least 38mm thick pine for a 13 tread staircase. The treads are 28" wide. I've seen many 'flatpack' staircases sold with 22mm mdf treads (and 9mm plywood risers) so I think 20mm oak should be strong enough with perhaps a centre support as you and others have suggested.
Arthur
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Arthur2 wrote:

I agree. My stairs are 19mm MDF and are fully adequate. The ones that aren't are the 1/2" antique victorian pine ones, where people can, do, and have stuck their feet through.
Just fill they ends with plastic wood and plane rather than sand.
I do not understand why you are using something as nasty as pine for the stringer: either use proper oak, if you want to stain it, or MDF which is far more stable and paints well.
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Well I might go for a more handsome wood for the strings but the reason I'm looking at pine is because i want to achieve the painted riser and treated plain oak tread effect.so the risers will be painted ply. I also want to avoid a 12" wide string to create something less 'heavy' in appearance. So 10" max width would need to be at least 38mm thick. I was considering buying the graded C16 or C24 timbers and asking them to plane it all round. If I went for oak I think I would have buy 50mm x 275mm which is about 25/metre before delivery.(eg SL HARDWOODS) And that would be at least 200 before delivery.
Arthur
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