redwood fence post fix


We have a small (8 section) basketweave fence that's been around for 40+ years. I recently reworked several of the panels using as much of the redwood as possible and using cedar when I had to replace wood.
The post that holds the large gate has rotted at the bottom (was repaired a couple times) at the top of the last concrete pour.
My idea is to use the original redwood post but to use a pipe to secure the post. My thought is to place a concrete filled pvc pipe into the center of the post, perhaps 3-4 feet deep, glue (or screw) the pipe inside the post and then set the pvc pipe into fresh concrete (again about 2 feet down).
I'm not a woodworker and don't have a horizontal boring machine that could bore a 2 inch hole in the center of a post 3-4 feet.
I've thought of cutting the post in half then routing out the material, placing the pipe, then glueing the two halves together but don't know if I'd just be introducing another failure point with that long joint and weather seapage, etc..
Any thoughts on how a layman could tackle this, or should I try to find someone with a boring machine? (dont know what heading that would be in the yellow pages)
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| We have a small (8 section) basketweave fence that's been around for | 40+ years. I recently reworked several of the panels using as much of | the redwood as possible and using cedar when I had to replace wood. | | The post that holds the large gate has rotted at the bottom (was | repaired a couple times) at the top of the last concrete pour. | | My idea is to use the original redwood post but to use a pipe to | secure the post. My thought is to place a concrete filled pvc pipe | into the center of the post, perhaps 3-4 feet deep, glue (or screw) | the pipe inside the post and then set the pvc pipe into fresh concrete | (again about 2 feet down). | | I'm not a woodworker and don't have a horizontal boring machine that | could bore a 2 inch hole in the center of a post 3-4 feet. | | I've thought of cutting the post in half then routing out the | material, placing the pipe, then glueing the two halves together but | don't know if I'd just be introducing another failure point with that | long joint and weather seapage, etc.. | | Any thoughts on how a layman could tackle this, or should I try to | find someone with a boring machine? (dont know what heading that | would be in the yellow pages) |
Nahmie, heaven forbid, did something like this when he built a flagpole from scratch. Your concept of cutting the post will work if you use epoxy resin (waterproof glue) same as for boat building. Don't forget the biscuits.
Concerning weather seepage, I built a pair of octagonal cedar lamp poles (8' high) out of left over 2X4's from my deck some 10 years ago. I covered the top and bottom with clear silicone and popped on the lamps. To date there has been no evidence of weather damage.
--
PDQ
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PDQ wrote:

When faced with problems like this I head down to the local building supply. They are usually familiar with local conditions, building regs and stuff. I presume there are no side issues like pools etc. that call for oddball measures etc.
Sounds to me like you know a lot of the tricks tho.
I don't know your local weather conditions etc. but if it lasted 40 years it must be pretty good conditions - not much rain and no termites. :- Lucky stiff! :-)
-- Will R. Jewel Boxes and Wood Art http://woodwork.pmccl.com The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it. George Bernard Shaw
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Not sure about the weather conditions. I'm in the southeast USA so we get our share of wet weather.
That's the beauty of redwood. Its a great outdoor wood.

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I would suggest that you do it the right way. Completely remove the old post and install a new post. I believe that you will be happier in the long run and it will probably be less work. I've replaced numerous redwood posts on a basketweave fence. If the old post is set in concrete it can be a real pain to dig up the concrete but it is still only an extra hour. However it sounds like you plan to remove the old base regardless. The new post needs to be strong if it supports the gate so you need a good concrete base.
Concrete filled PVC will not have much sideways strength. The concrete will easily fracture. You might fill the pipe with concrete and rebar but I wouldn't bet on success.
If you are going to all this effort do something where you are confident of success.
Dick

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Richard Cline wrote:

Personally if I were going to do this I'd also use Ipe or if you want the red color Massaranduba for the replacement post. Either is much harder and stronger than redwood and more decay resistant as well. If redwood lasted 40 years in the application then ipe should last longer than anybody now living.

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When I was looking at getting replacement panels for the fence, I couldn't find anyone online that carried aimilar basketweave. Sections that were the same size but less "weave" were over $1000 each.
When I tried finding replacement redwood slats or rails I couldn't find those either. I couldn't even find a supplier of 2x2 redwood for the rails. None of my local suppliers had or knew any sources for redwood, and I have a feeling I would not find a 4x4 redwood post that would fit my budget.
The idea is to keep the redwood that I have since it's hard to come by and really expensive.
I thought about using PVC because it's easier to drill holes in the bottom and put bolts thru to add in "twist proofing" in the concrete base. I'm sure I could find some square tubing that would probably be better for the application and predrill holes in it I guess.
Perhaps a better concrete with higher shear strength or something would also be advantageous.

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You should be able to keep your old basketweave panels. It is no big deal to separate them from the post. Just cut between the post and the 2 X 2 members amd you will quickly sever the 3 or 4 nails.
If you can't get 4 X 4 redwood, get cedar or treated lumber or any kind of 4 X 4 and treat it yourself. I find your cost of 4 X 4 redwood astounding. We can get it here in California very cheaply. I just priced some fencing done by a local contractor. A top quality 6' redwood fence costs around $30 a foot. (4 X 4 Redwood posts, 1 X 6 redwood boards, and 2 X 4 redwood laterals.) I'm sure that half the cost is labor.
I'm about to replace 200 feet of basketweave. My dog tears it up llike it was balsa.
I still maintain that you will be ahead by putting in a new, solid post and eliminate the patchwork efforts.
Dick

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Richard Cline wrote:

You might want to try Ipe or Massaranduba instead of redwood--I suspect that your dog is going to find them much less tearable. Unless of course replacing torn up basketweave is your idea of fun.

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Ouch. Just got off the phone with the closest redwood person I could find and one 4x4x8'post is $98.00 and they say it probably isn't as good a quality as what was available 30+ years ago. Plus the store is about 40 miles one way from me and I know shipping would add a few more bucks to it.
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Clean out the old hole. Coat the inside with concrete bonder (basically watery glue - but you can get it at the HW store) Get a piece of 1/4" x 3-1/2" x 24-30" steel plate with 1/2" holes bored in it. Set one end of the plate in the hole and grout it in place with the plate perpendicular to the plane of the fence. Cut a 1/4" wide slot in the post. Drill holes to match the holes in the plate. Use some 3/8" bolts and washers to secure the post to the plate. One of the ready-made post bases may work too, but may not fit in the hole you have.
It will make replacement easy in the future.
-j

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My first thought was to use one of those post bases but I don't think it would be sufficient to withstand the horizontal loads placed on it by the fence's gate. It would only be attached to about 4" of the post at the base.

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Get the big post (actually column) bases that are 8" above the level of the concrete. http://www.strongtie.com/products/connectors/LCB-CB.html
-j
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IF they still make them, you can buy a metal plate/rod thing at the BORG that's made to do just what you're trying to use a pipe for.. it was a long rod with a bolt plate welded on it, you pound the stake into the ground and bold the old fence post to it..
mac
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