Re: What is it? XC



Now this is handy! Imagine a pilot checking a distance on the map while flying. Without taking the watch off! White Knuckle Airways, anyone?
Nick
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Motor Modelle // Engine Models
http://www.motor-manufaktur.de
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I did a search on ice spud and most references that I found mentioned that it was used as a chisel.
Another possibility is that it could be a sand rammer, used for compacting a sand base by a stone paver. But those usually weigh 25 pounds or more and this one isn't near that heavy, but still it looks like it was used for tamping or compacting.
Rob
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How about a tamping tool for fence posts? When we put in wooden posts using an auger-type post hole digger, there was about 1/2 to 1" of space around the post into which the fill had to be packed. In our case, we used the steering rod from an old Model T, but I suspect that there aren't a whole lot of those around anymore :-) It may be that what you have was a custom home-made tool for such a purpose.
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It looks like some sort of tamping tool to me, too. But I also wonder if its some sort of metalworking tool....for some reason, I get this mental image of this being used to reach into narrow spaces to provide a backing to hammer rivets against or something. Possibly in a gutter?
How heavy is the head?
Or maybe this is a tool to turn a switch on an overhead fan, like that mystery item from a few months back? ;-)
--humunculus
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The head of this tool probably weighs between four and five pounds.
Here is a photo of a couple of sand rammers:
http://www.backyardmetalcasting.com/sellstuff/2rammers.JPG
The head on the larger one looks the same as the tool in my photo, and the smaller one looks very much like the second reaming iron that I previously mentioned. The handles are obviously different, but the business ends look exactly like the number 518.
Rob
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If that worries you, don't fly in a small plane. Particularly not in mountainous areas. The pilot plotting his course on charts spread out on the right-hand front seat might disturb you.
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